Andy Rourke bass part for "This Charming Man" - 56th best bass part of all time in BassPlayer Magazine

It's just been voted the 56th best bass part of all time in BassPlayer Magazine.

'The Smiths were a group at least a decade ahead of their time, doomed to be more read about than listened to during their active career, and only fully appreciated several years after the band members had gone their separate ways.

Bassist Andy Rourke is the group's unsung hero , complementing the guitar wizardry of Johnny Marr in a way that most of us could never hope to do.

The fast fingered line on This Charming Man is his masterpiece'.

Lovely to see Andy getting some long overdue praise for his bass work in The Smiths.
 
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NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH #FBPB
Not the best timekeeping
 
N

Nakedbrunch

Guest
Andy deserves a lot more credit but This Charming Man isn't even close to being his finest hour.
 
J

Juan Dulces

Guest
The arrangement for bass have had some help from John Porter. If you listen to HOH version you'll have something slightly different. But, of course, Andy is one of the best bass player of post-punk. I think he's better than Peter Hook, however, Hook has a very personal way of playing. Andy has much more talent and skill.

The Hatful of Hollow version was recorded only 3 days after the song was written. It really showcases the talent of the group as a whole.

That version of the song is superior to all others they released in my opinion.
 

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
The Hatful of Hollow version was recorded only 3 days after the song was written. It really showcases the talent of the group as a whole.

That version of the song is superior to all others they released in my opinion.

The HoH version definitely has a purity and it's magical but I think it feels a bit 'lightweight' compared to the main single version, IMO.
 
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Raphael Lambach

Well-Known Member
The Hatful of Hollow version was recorded only 3 days after the song was written. It really showcases the talent of the group as a whole.

That version of the song is superior to all others they released in my opinion.
HoH was one of the first Smiths album I bought, then this version was the very first I had at home, phisically.

And I am very found of it.
 
J

Juan Dulces

Guest
The HoH version definitely has a purity and it's magical but I think it feels a bit 'lightweight' compared to the main single version, IMO.

Thanks for replying. Honestly, the Hatful version always reminded me of 60's R&B. It has such a swing to it. The single(s) version was always too over-produced for me, and too by-the-numbers. A pop recording in the early 80s (though it did sound better than the tracks on the 1st Smiths LP).

You'd might agree - the Hatful version is literally timeless. If you put that on now....recording quality wise, it's just a straight-forward recording from even a NEW band in 2022 (demo/early online 'release'/etc). On the flipside, the single(s) release sounds very dated. Another example of this on Hatful: Back to the Old House (no age) against the version on Louder Than Bombs (40 years old).
 
J

Juan Dulces

Guest
HoH was one of the first Smiths album I bought, then this version was the very first I had at home, phisically.

And I am very found of it.

Can't blame you there.

I already had Vauxhall and I, but Hatful of Hollow was my first Smiths release that I owned (in 1994).

It sounded like nothing else they played anywhere in the States. It was a revelation to me - even today it's difficult to find musical moments as beautiful to the ears as what's on that album. Also, the photos in the CD version of Hatful (of the band in Paris and two of Morrissey I believe) were unique and had a sophistication to them.

Back then, I felt strangely related to another part of the world somehow when I listened to that record, and I'm still connected today. Morrissey, Johnny, Andy and Mike - thank you for giving us this great record!
 
B

Beethoven was deaf

Guest
These lists suck anyway and mentioning them is culture of the void, it is only for people who are not sure of their tastes in music.
Anyway, an artist is always revered by their peers. And what other bassists have said of Andy Rouke ?
The idea that Johnny Marr shone only because of his true merits is wrong; Johnny reached excellence because he had to support him a bassist who could found great lines to brighten his parts and a drummer who was very musical as well.
 
J

Johnny likes it hot

Guest
LOL actually the list with the 100 bassists in was chosen by journo Joel McIver on May 17, 2022

So no bassists from the bands such as Joy Division, Wire, Siouxsie & the Banshees, etc...

it is rock for fools; or this list of void of US rock'n'roll culture for malls
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
LOL actually the list with the 100 bassists in was chosen by journo Joel McIver on May 17, 2022

So no bassists from the bands such as Joy Division, Wire, Siouxsie & the Banshees, etc...

it is rock for fools; or this list of void of US rock'n'roll culture for malls
Peter Hook was in there for his bass line on Regret by New Order.
 
M

Mr. Mustache

Guest
It is absolutely an amazing bassline. It would be a totally different song without it. Rourke was critical to the Smiths sound (and Joyce too), though obviously Moz & Marr are the songwriting giants.
 

gordyboy9

Let The Bullets Fly.
never understood these polls,what makes it better than the 57th or worse than the 55th.
 
L

Les Tameside

Guest
Keeps journalists in a job who suppose their knowledge and opinion is superior to that of the rest of us.
Equally, this article has shone a little extra light on a criminally ignored member of The Smiths (and the Manchester music scene generally). Thatโ€™s surely a positive, and justification enough?
 

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