Edinburgh, Scotland - Usher Hall (July 30, 2012) post-show

Post your info and reviews related to this concert in the comments section below. Other links (photos, external reviews, etc.) related to this concert will also be compiled in this section as they are sent in.


Set List:

Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me / Everyday Is Like Sunday / Alma Matters / I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris / You Have Killed Me / Shoplifters Of The World Unite / You're The One For Me, Fatty / Speedway / Maladjusted / Still Ill / One Day Goodbye Will Be Farewell / Ouija Board, Ouija Board / I Know It's Over / Let Me Kiss You / People Are The Same Everywhere / To Give (The Reason I Live) / Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want / I Will See You In Far Off Places / Meat Is Murder // How Soon Is Now?

set list provided by pubrockcoma



 
Last edited:
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm such a flop fan, I didn't recognize "Maladjusted" till the chorus came in, oh dear. LNID was a strange opener, it's usually an encore.. not that I'll ever complain about him doing that one.

Surprised Imperfect List was revived, but that covers his rants for him. Getting the audience to talk to him/the crowd was a great new interactive touch, surprised that wasn't thought of before. Glad he never passed the mic to me, I wouldn't know what the hell to say to him other than cliched "thanks", but if this continues people could prepare shit.

HSIN seemed more muscular/layered than usual, I guess this new band are rather good? But what would I know. I liked the one new new song and dramatic ballad quite a lot on first listen, much better than the last new songs that were played. Now I'm really annoyed cause I want an album, following the holy 00s trinity will be difficult but I'm sure there's at least some more future Moz classics, he's delivered a few since the Quarry comeback so why would it stop now.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
What would Edinburgh be without the rain?

Who knows...but it wouldn't be Edinburgh.

What would we be without Morrissey?

Happy, well adjusted, successful...normal?

Maybe...but I'm glad I've got Morrissey even if I lack those other things.

The crowd at the Usher Hall is the usual unusual.

Balding, middle-aged men desperately tugging the last few stray strands of hair to attention in an effort to make something that vaguely resembles a quiff.

Young turks with skinny jeans, fat egos and good shoes.

Pretty girls, pretty boys.

At least one skinhead in beautiful shoes.

People old enough to know better.

People young enough to know no different.

As the imperfect list blares from the sound system the atmosphere in the hall transforms us from this rag-tag bunch of misfits into one perfectly formed mass...we're all here because of the tie that binds.

Morrissey hits the stage looking fighting fit and able...trim, muscular, perky.

"Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" is, in any setting and at any time, one of the most beautiful songs in the popular music songbook. It's a bold move to open a concert with a song like this...it's haunting, affecting and full of yearning. Every line is bawled back at the master and when the roof nearly comes off the venue at it's close it all makes sense.

He then roars through "Everyday is Like Sunday" and "Alma Matters" with the band sounding tight and his voice getting stronger with every verse one can't help but feel that this could be a night to remember. Who else could take a single like "Alma" which barely made a dent in the charts and that features on an album that is, at best, patchy by his standards and make it sound like the only song you every wanted to hear?

When he hands the mic to the front row a Northern lass pleads with him; "Coom to Wigan Morrissey...please, coom to Wigan." Taking the mic back he barks "No" and then we are headlong into a clutch of four singles in a row; "I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris", "You Have Killed Me", "Shoplifters of the World Tonight" and "You're the One for me Fatty". Before he introduces his band of "love hungry bachelors" we are given "Speedway" which is given a re-working but doesn't suffer as a result...if anything it sounds better than ever.

Casual observers and supporters of Morrissey would now be looking for "First of the Gang to Die", "This Charming Man" and "Irish Blood English Heart"...Morrissey isn't one for giving people what they want so instead we are given a blistering rendition of "Maladjusted" which is played with such aggression, such power and such ferocity that I am left reeling. Then it's the glory of "Still Ill", the demanding "One Day Goodbye Will be Farewell" and the hysterical but moving "Ouija Board, Ouija Board" before being emotionally assaulted by "I Know It's Over".

I'm not sure that before tonight any of those songs would feature in my personal "Best of..." collection but after hearing them tonight they won't ever be off of that collection.

At the end of "Let Me Kiss You" Morrissey strips to the waist...not an unusual sight at a Morrissey concert but one which, in recent years (if we are being honest) has resulted in a few downward glances as we have tried to avoid the fact that our personal saviour has fallen victim of middle-age spread. Not tonight. He looks fabulous. I'm saying no more for fear of plunging myself into some sort of homo-erotic coma.

"Todays lesson is that we are all, all of us, minorities..." is the introduction to the only unreleased song we hear tonight. "People are the Same Everywhere" sounds like it is cut from the same cloth as "All You Need is Me" or "Something is Squeezing my Skull". It's power-pop...rocky and raucous. I like it...so there.

The cover version of "To Give" by Frankie Valli is dedicated to Kevin Roberts a Morrissey fan given a mention by a friend in the front row. He passed away earlier this year, was a huge Morrissey fan and his friend wanted to have him remembered so when the mic came to him he told us all about him and Morrissey preceded the song with a simply "For Kevin". A beautiful moment and a none too subtle reminder of how important Morrissey is to so many of us.

"We all know that the British judiciary killed Oscar Wilde and that something similar happened to Shelley, Byron, Keats and Yeats by the establishment. The British establishment rewards mediocrity and the mediocre. It also hates people who are not mediocre so..."

"Please, please, please..." is so moving tonight that, genuinely, I am in tears by the time it ends. I'm confident I'm not the only one.

"I Will See You in Far Off Places" is thumping, loud, aggressive, blistering and rage filled. It's a glorious reminder of why Morrissey matters. Without a record deal, and stubbornly refusing to do the DIY thing, it is easy to see him as old news, yesterdays man. But when he can write songs like this, that have more to say about the world we live in than any public proclamation by the vile David Cameron ever could, it is clear to see why we need him now more than ever.

Most artists like to end on a high note...a romp through a few of the "oldies", the fans favourites...Morrissey chooses to end the set with "Meat is Murder" complete with a gruesome set of images that may well serve to convert yet another generation of fans to the vegetarian cause. It's powerful and political.

An encore of "How Soon is Now" seems like the only possible way a concert like this could have ended. A trip down memory lane, the greatest single his old band never released, a clarion call to the lonely...it's everything you need to know about Morrissey.

8 singles.

A cover version.

7 Smiths songs.

Album tracks from "Maladjusted", "Vauxhall and I", "Ringleader of the Tormentors", "The Queen is Dead", "The Smiths", "Meat is Murder" and "Strangeways Here We Come" (I'm sure I've missed or mistaken some of the songs...forgive me, it's late).

1 unreleased song.

People will complain no matter what Morrissey plays...there is always something you want, something you are tired of...but the truth is that 20 songs over 90 minutes with all sorts of treats packed in isn't really a set you can complain about.

The last night of the tour...questions over whether or not he will tour again, will he ever release another album, will we see his autobiography? For now though I'm glad I was there...I sang my heart out, I laughed, I cried and I felt part of something.

What more could you want?

Through all the garbage here, it's people like you, wonderful people, who make coming here-even though it is insanity-worthwhile. This jewel you wrote, shines like a pink diamond in a sea of shit. Thank you. Thank you for "getting" Morrissey and thank you for, pretty much, the only thing worth reading on this entire website. Without you, this place is pointless.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
PS - Guy with the iTablet in the middle of the stalls taking photos - You're a cock. The people filming it on mobiles are bad enough but you have taken it to a new level for me - Please don't bother in future - You look stupid and you were pissing off loads of folk near me.

More positive review/karma to follow tomorrow.

He was holding up a huge ipad taping the show? Lol. You should've thrown shit at it.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I loved how "Alma" was pointedly followed by "Paris". I always thought those songs were twins, with "Paris" being a nice update of "Alma", that same uplifting sound.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
PS - Guy with the iTablet in the middle of the stalls taking photos - You're a cock. The people filming it on mobiles are bad enough but you have taken it to a new level for me - Please don't bother in future - You look stupid and you were pissing off loads of folk near me.

More positive review/karma to follow tomorrow.

God, that is horrendous. He must've known he would look like a right twat. Plus it's obstructive and distracting, he's got some nerve to do that. What next? Bring in your laptop?
 
A

A non ymous

Guest
What would Edinburgh be without the rain?

Who knows...but it wouldn't be Edinburgh.

What would we be without Morrissey?

Happy, well adjusted, successful...normal?

Maybe...but I'm glad I've got Morrissey even if I lack those other things.

The crowd at the Usher Hall is the usual unusual.

Balding, middle-aged men desperately tugging the last few stray strands of hair to attention in an effort to make something that vaguely resembles a quiff.

Young turks with skinny jeans, fat egos and good shoes.

Pretty girls, pretty boys.

At least one skinhead in beautiful shoes.

People old enough to know better.

People young enough to know no different.

As the imperfect list blares from the sound system the atmosphere in the hall transforms us from this rag-tag bunch of misfits into one perfectly formed mass...we're all here because of the tie that binds.

Morrissey hits the stage looking fighting fit and able...trim, muscular, perky.

"Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" is, in any setting and at any time, one of the most beautiful songs in the popular music songbook. It's a bold move to open a concert with a song like this...it's haunting, affecting and full of yearning. Every line is bawled back at the master and when the roof nearly comes off the venue at it's close it all makes sense.

He then roars through "Everyday is Like Sunday" and "Alma Matters" with the band sounding tight and his voice getting stronger with every verse one can't help but feel that this could be a night to remember. Who else could take a single like "Alma" which barely made a dent in the charts and that features on an album that is, at best, patchy by his standards and make it sound like the only song you every wanted to hear?

When he hands the mic to the front row a Northern lass pleads with him; "Coom to Wigan Morrissey...please, coom to Wigan." Taking the mic back he barks "No" and then we are headlong into a clutch of four singles in a row; "I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris", "You Have Killed Me", "Shoplifters of the World Tonight" and "You're the One for me Fatty". Before he introduces his band of "love hungry bachelors" we are given "Speedway" which is given a re-working but doesn't suffer as a result...if anything it sounds better than ever.

Casual observers and supporters of Morrissey would now be looking for "First of the Gang to Die", "This Charming Man" and "Irish Blood English Heart"...Morrissey isn't one for giving people what they want so instead we are given a blistering rendition of "Maladjusted" which is played with such aggression, such power and such ferocity that I am left reeling. Then it's the glory of "Still Ill", the demanding "One Day Goodbye Will be Farewell" and the hysterical but moving "Ouija Board, Ouija Board" before being emotionally assaulted by "I Know It's Over".

I'm not sure that before tonight any of those songs would feature in my personal "Best of..." collection but after hearing them tonight they won't ever be off of that collection.

At the end of "Let Me Kiss You" Morrissey strips to the waist...not an unusual sight at a Morrissey concert but one which, in recent years (if we are being honest) has resulted in a few downward glances as we have tried to avoid the fact that our personal saviour has fallen victim of middle-age spread. Not tonight. He looks fabulous. I'm saying no more for fear of plunging myself into some sort of homo-erotic coma.

"Todays lesson is that we are all, all of us, minorities..." is the introduction to the only unreleased song we hear tonight. "People are the Same Everywhere" sounds like it is cut from the same cloth as "All You Need is Me" or "Something is Squeezing my Skull". It's power-pop...rocky and raucous. I like it...so there.

The cover version of "To Give" by Frankie Valli is dedicated to Kevin Roberts a Morrissey fan given a mention by a friend in the front row. He passed away earlier this year, was a huge Morrissey fan and his friend wanted to have him remembered so when the mic came to him he told us all about him and Morrissey preceded the song with a simply "For Kevin". A beautiful moment and a none too subtle reminder of how important Morrissey is to so many of us.

"We all know that the British judiciary killed Oscar Wilde and that something similar happened to Shelley, Byron, Keats and Yeats by the establishment. The British establishment rewards mediocrity and the mediocre. It also hates people who are not mediocre so..."

"Please, please, please..." is so moving tonight that, genuinely, I am in tears by the time it ends. I'm confident I'm not the only one.

"I Will See You in Far Off Places" is thumping, loud, aggressive, blistering and rage filled. It's a glorious reminder of why Morrissey matters. Without a record deal, and stubbornly refusing to do the DIY thing, it is easy to see him as old news, yesterdays man. But when he can write songs like this, that have more to say about the world we live in than any public proclamation by the vile David Cameron ever could, it is clear to see why we need him now more than ever.

Most artists like to end on a high note...a romp through a few of the "oldies", the fans favourites...Morrissey chooses to end the set with "Meat is Murder" complete with a gruesome set of images that may well serve to convert yet another generation of fans to the vegetarian cause. It's powerful and political.

An encore of "How Soon is Now" seems like the only possible way a concert like this could have ended. A trip down memory lane, the greatest single his old band never released, a clarion call to the lonely...it's everything you need to know about Morrissey.

8 singles.

A cover version.

7 Smiths songs.

Album tracks from "Maladjusted", "Vauxhall and I", "Ringleader of the Tormentors", "The Queen is Dead", "The Smiths", "Meat is Murder" and "Strangeways Here We Come" (I'm sure I've missed or mistaken some of the songs...forgive me, it's late).

1 unreleased song.

People will complain no matter what Morrissey plays...there is always something you want, something you are tired of...but the truth is that 20 songs over 90 minutes with all sorts of treats packed in isn't really a set you can complain about.

The last night of the tour...questions over whether or not he will tour again, will he ever release another album, will we see his autobiography? For now though I'm glad I was there...I sang my heart out, I laughed, I cried and I felt part of something.

What more could you want?

As others have said great review, thank you for taking the time of putting this thoughtful overview together. I couldn't have said it better. What a great night, maybe the key is to experience Morrissey in a more intimate setting than in a huge arena setting. Having seen him several times on this tour this is the happiest I have seen him, his face was relaxed and he often had a little smile. Maybe he found some happiness in the backyard "Il faut cultiver notre jardin".
 

celibate

Forever Ill
What would Edinburgh be without the rain?

Who knows...but it wouldn't be Edinburgh.

What would we be without Morrissey?

Happy, well adjusted, successful...normal?

Maybe...but I'm glad I've got Morrissey even if I lack those other things.

The crowd at the Usher Hall is the usual unusual.

Balding, middle-aged men desperately tugging the last few stray strands of hair to attention in an effort to make something that vaguely resembles a quiff.

Young turks with skinny jeans, fat egos and good shoes.

Pretty girls, pretty boys.

At least one skinhead in beautiful shoes.

People old enough to know better.

People young enough to know no different.

As the imperfect list blares from the sound system the atmosphere in the hall transforms us from this rag-tag bunch of misfits into one perfectly formed mass...we're all here because of the tie that binds.

Morrissey hits the stage looking fighting fit and able...trim, muscular, perky.

"Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" is, in any setting and at any time, one of the most beautiful songs in the popular music songbook. It's a bold move to open a concert with a song like this...it's haunting, affecting and full of yearning. Every line is bawled back at the master and when the roof nearly comes off the venue at it's close it all makes sense.

He then roars through "Everyday is Like Sunday" and "Alma Matters" with the band sounding tight and his voice getting stronger with every verse one can't help but feel that this could be a night to remember. Who else could take a single like "Alma" which barely made a dent in the charts and that features on an album that is, at best, patchy by his standards and make it sound like the only song you every wanted to hear?

When he hands the mic to the front row a Northern lass pleads with him; "Coom to Wigan Morrissey...please, coom to Wigan." Taking the mic back he barks "No" and then we are headlong into a clutch of four singles in a row; "I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris", "You Have Killed Me", "Shoplifters of the World Tonight" and "You're the One for me Fatty". Before he introduces his band of "love hungry bachelors" we are given "Speedway" which is given a re-working but doesn't suffer as a result...if anything it sounds better than ever.

Casual observers and supporters of Morrissey would now be looking for "First of the Gang to Die", "This Charming Man" and "Irish Blood English Heart"...Morrissey isn't one for giving people what they want so instead we are given a blistering rendition of "Maladjusted" which is played with such aggression, such power and such ferocity that I am left reeling. Then it's the glory of "Still Ill", the demanding "One Day Goodbye Will be Farewell" and the hysterical but moving "Ouija Board, Ouija Board" before being emotionally assaulted by "I Know It's Over".

I'm not sure that before tonight any of those songs would feature in my personal "Best of..." collection but after hearing them tonight they won't ever be off of that collection.

At the end of "Let Me Kiss You" Morrissey strips to the waist...not an unusual sight at a Morrissey concert but one which, in recent years (if we are being honest) has resulted in a few downward glances as we have tried to avoid the fact that our personal saviour has fallen victim of middle-age spread. Not tonight. He looks fabulous. I'm saying no more for fear of plunging myself into some sort of homo-erotic coma.

"Todays lesson is that we are all, all of us, minorities..." is the introduction to the only unreleased song we hear tonight. "People are the Same Everywhere" sounds like it is cut from the same cloth as "All You Need is Me" or "Something is Squeezing my Skull". It's power-pop...rocky and raucous. I like it...so there.

The cover version of "To Give" by Frankie Valli is dedicated to Kevin Roberts a Morrissey fan given a mention by a friend in the front row. He passed away earlier this year, was a huge Morrissey fan and his friend wanted to have him remembered so when the mic came to him he told us all about him and Morrissey preceded the song with a simply "For Kevin". A beautiful moment and a none too subtle reminder of how important Morrissey is to so many of us.

"We all know that the British judiciary killed Oscar Wilde and that something similar happened to Shelley, Byron, Keats and Yeats by the establishment. The British establishment rewards mediocrity and the mediocre. It also hates people who are not mediocre so..."

"Please, please, please..." is so moving tonight that, genuinely, I am in tears by the time it ends. I'm confident I'm not the only one.

"I Will See You in Far Off Places" is thumping, loud, aggressive, blistering and rage filled. It's a glorious reminder of why Morrissey matters. Without a record deal, and stubbornly refusing to do the DIY thing, it is easy to see him as old news, yesterdays man. But when he can write songs like this, that have more to say about the world we live in than any public proclamation by the vile David Cameron ever could, it is clear to see why we need him now more than ever.

Most artists like to end on a high note...a romp through a few of the "oldies", the fans favourites...Morrissey chooses to end the set with "Meat is Murder" complete with a gruesome set of images that may well serve to convert yet another generation of fans to the vegetarian cause. It's powerful and political.

An encore of "How Soon is Now" seems like the only possible way a concert like this could have ended. A trip down memory lane, the greatest single his old band never released, a clarion call to the lonely...it's everything you need to know about Morrissey.

8 singles.

A cover version.

7 Smiths songs.

Album tracks from "Maladjusted", "Vauxhall and I", "Ringleader of the Tormentors", "The Queen is Dead", "The Smiths", "Meat is Murder" and "Strangeways Here We Come" (I'm sure I've missed or mistaken some of the songs...forgive me, it's late).

1 unreleased song.

People will complain no matter what Morrissey plays...there is always something you want, something you are tired of...but the truth is that 20 songs over 90 minutes with all sorts of treats packed in isn't really a set you can complain about.

The last night of the tour...questions over whether or not he will tour again, will he ever release another album, will we see his autobiography? For now though I'm glad I was there...I sang my heart out, I laughed, I cried and I felt part of something.

What more could you want?

What more could we want


well a bloke from Whythenshaw, playing a few Smiths songs as guest

well you asked, not that it ever will happen

thanks fort the revieuw, didn't snip anything from it

now rest for Solomon and for Lynn to buy another wardrobe for hubby Boz

and in the fall we'll see him [for me] in far of places [on this site]

thank you:thumb:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
My thanks to those who have offered such lovely comments about my "review".

Can I apologise for referring to "Shoplifters of the World Unite" as "Shoplifters of the World TONIGHT". A very silly mistake to make.

I also noticed a chap with an iPad. It not only caused a massive distraction/obstruction for those around him but it also served to make him look absolutely ridiculous. I don't think I have ever seen someone using an iPad in this way before and I hope I don't again.

Anyhoo. My thanks again for the lovely responses to my thoughts on a wonderful night.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
What would Edinburgh be without the rain?

Who knows...but it wouldn't be Edinburgh.

What would we be without Morrissey?

Happy, well adjusted, successful...normal?

..........

The last night of the tour...questions over whether or not he will tour again, will he ever release another album, will we see his autobiography? For now though I'm glad I was there...I sang my heart out, I laughed, I cried and I felt part of something.

What more could you want?

Well, that was the review of the tour - brilliant, thanks so much for taking the time. You have restored some pride to this weary website and you have articulated what so many people feel about our Mozzer.

Excellent, excellent piece of writing.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
PS - Guy with the iTablet in the middle of the stalls taking photos - You're a cock. The people filming it on mobiles are bad enough but you have taken it to a new level for me - Please don't bother in future - You look stupid and you were pissing off loads of folk near me.

More positive review/karma to follow tomorrow.

i wasn't there and i hate him too!!
remember when people went to gigs to watch the bands and listen to the music?!
now every sap wants to film the whole thing so they can clog up you tube with wobbly inaudible shite. and they have the audacity to tut when they get an elbow in the back of the head!
when did rock n roll become a corporate bun fight to be viewed and discected! the audience are there to play a part and can, and often do, easily kill a gig.
keep your phones in your pockets and your opinions in your head, the world doesnt need either.
remember why wanted to be there.
 

divine

New Member
What would Edinburgh be without the rain?

Who knows...but it wouldn't be Edinburgh.

What would we be without Morrissey?

Happy, well adjusted, successful...normal?

Maybe...but I'm glad I've got Morrissey even if I lack those other things.

The crowd at the Usher Hall is the usual unusual.

Balding, middle-aged men desperately tugging the last few stray strands of hair to attention in an effort to make something that vaguely resembles a quiff.

Young turks with skinny jeans, fat egos and good shoes.

Pretty girls, pretty boys.

At least one skinhead in beautiful shoes.

People old enough to know better.

People young enough to know no different.

As the imperfect list blares from the sound system the atmosphere in the hall transforms us from this rag-tag bunch of misfits into one perfectly formed mass...we're all here because of the tie that binds.

Morrissey hits the stage looking fighting fit and able...trim, muscular, perky.

"Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" is, in any setting and at any time, one of the most beautiful songs in the popular music songbook. It's a bold move to open a concert with a song like this...it's haunting, affecting and full of yearning. Every line is bawled back at the master and when the roof nearly comes off the venue at it's close it all makes sense.

He then roars through "Everyday is Like Sunday" and "Alma Matters" with the band sounding tight and his voice getting stronger with every verse one can't help but feel that this could be a night to remember. Who else could take a single like "Alma" which barely made a dent in the charts and that features on an album that is, at best, patchy by his standards and make it sound like the only song you every wanted to hear?

When he hands the mic to the front row a Northern lass pleads with him; "Coom to Wigan Morrissey...please, coom to Wigan." Taking the mic back he barks "No" and then we are headlong into a clutch of four singles in a row; "I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris", "You Have Killed Me", "Shoplifters of the World Tonight" and "You're the One for me Fatty". Before he introduces his band of "love hungry bachelors" we are given "Speedway" which is given a re-working but doesn't suffer as a result...if anything it sounds better than ever.

Casual observers and supporters of Morrissey would now be looking for "First of the Gang to Die", "This Charming Man" and "Irish Blood English Heart"...Morrissey isn't one for giving people what they want so instead we are given a blistering rendition of "Maladjusted" which is played with such aggression, such power and such ferocity that I am left reeling. Then it's the glory of "Still Ill", the demanding "One Day Goodbye Will be Farewell" and the hysterical but moving "Ouija Board, Ouija Board" before being emotionally assaulted by "I Know It's Over".

I'm not sure that before tonight any of those songs would feature in my personal "Best of..." collection but after hearing them tonight they won't ever be off of that collection.

At the end of "Let Me Kiss You" Morrissey strips to the waist...not an unusual sight at a Morrissey concert but one which, in recent years (if we are being honest) has resulted in a few downward glances as we have tried to avoid the fact that our personal saviour has fallen victim of middle-age spread. Not tonight. He looks fabulous. I'm saying no more for fear of plunging myself into some sort of homo-erotic coma.

"Todays lesson is that we are all, all of us, minorities..." is the introduction to the only unreleased song we hear tonight. "People are the Same Everywhere" sounds like it is cut from the same cloth as "All You Need is Me" or "Something is Squeezing my Skull". It's power-pop...rocky and raucous. I like it...so there.

The cover version of "To Give" by Frankie Valli is dedicated to Kevin Roberts a Morrissey fan given a mention by a friend in the front row. He passed away earlier this year, was a huge Morrissey fan and his friend wanted to have him remembered so when the mic came to him he told us all about him and Morrissey preceded the song with a simply "For Kevin". A beautiful moment and a none too subtle reminder of how important Morrissey is to so many of us.

"We all know that the British judiciary killed Oscar Wilde and that something similar happened to Shelley, Byron, Keats and Yeats by the establishment. The British establishment rewards mediocrity and the mediocre. It also hates people who are not mediocre so..."

"Please, please, please..." is so moving tonight that, genuinely, I am in tears by the time it ends. I'm confident I'm not the only one.

"I Will See You in Far Off Places" is thumping, loud, aggressive, blistering and rage filled. It's a glorious reminder of why Morrissey matters. Without a record deal, and stubbornly refusing to do the DIY thing, it is easy to see him as old news, yesterdays man. But when he can write songs like this, that have more to say about the world we live in than any public proclamation by the vile David Cameron ever could, it is clear to see why we need him now more than ever.

Most artists like to end on a high note...a romp through a few of the "oldies", the fans favourites...Morrissey chooses to end the set with "Meat is Murder" complete with a gruesome set of images that may well serve to convert yet another generation of fans to the vegetarian cause. It's powerful and political.

An encore of "How Soon is Now" seems like the only possible way a concert like this could have ended. A trip down memory lane, the greatest single his old band never released, a clarion call to the lonely...it's everything you need to know about Morrissey.

8 singles.

A cover version.

7 Smiths songs.

Album tracks from "Maladjusted", "Vauxhall and I", "Ringleader of the Tormentors", "The Queen is Dead", "The Smiths", "Meat is Murder" and "Strangeways Here We Come" (I'm sure I've missed or mistaken some of the songs...forgive me, it's late).

1 unreleased song.

People will complain no matter what Morrissey plays...there is always something you want, something you are tired of...but the truth is that 20 songs over 90 minutes with all sorts of treats packed in isn't really a set you can complain about.

The last night of the tour...questions over whether or not he will tour again, will he ever release another album, will we see his autobiography? For now though I'm glad I was there...I sang my heart out, I laughed, I cried and I felt part of something.

What more could you want?

Beautiful review, thanks! I went to Manchester and it makes you wonder if the old awkward one does take notice of his fans feedback and improves the setlist. One can only wonder .......
 
J

Jammy Di

Guest
Hi.
My first ever time seeing Morrissey and I was not disappointed. I couldn't wait to see him as the excitement was reaching a creschendo by yesterday morning, and come just after 9pm, I was absolutely amazed. All the songs sounded great, and despite some of the negative comments on here, the band delivered the music perfectly.
I never realised the catchement of fans that would be at the gig, but there was a man in the queue called David, who at a guess was 50 years of age, he spent the whole day pretty much bad mouthing everyone, even people he had just been speaking to in the queue. He then spent the whole evening in the hall, from start to finish, bawling his eyes out like a baby.

The only downside was the people who just think they can push in and do as they like. A few people made it on to the stage, and one girl, who looked like frankenstein, got the microphone and asked Morrissey to come to wigan. Never heard of wigan, although he (Morrissey) was probably terrified by her.


Diane.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
My thanks to those who have offered such lovely comments about my "review".

You provided a really great balance between the 'facts' of the event and your emotional response to it. Really special and cheered me up as I've just had notification of a motoring offence!

Love the dedication to Kevin Roberts. Decorum. So much more dignified and appropriate than endless peeves about Madonna/Mike Joyce/Royals/Olympics/Omnivores.

The 'iPAD' exhibitionist sounds really sad. 'Look at me with my expensive consumer bauble!' The whole digital camera phenomenon is ruining concerts. It's almost as if people aren't interested in 'being there' but only in telling everyone else via YouTube how cool they think they are by their choice of gigs. Ditto the constant texting and even phone calls. MSomeone started noisily crunching on an apple at a Rufus Wainwright show I attended and couldn't fathom why I glared at him. It amazes me how folk have become so enslaved by their 'tamagochi' smartphones that they've become their slaves. I don't know how artists can stand the ADHD of some parts of the modern audience. I wish artists would ban this crap and just post a brief snippet of footage on YouTube for each gig themselves.

This sounds such a good show after the 'troubled' reports from Manchester. I thought Morrissey's PR team were geographically challenged initially when they said the arena would be the 'only UK show'. But perhaps Morrissey has decided to support the call for Scottish independence by pre-empting the referendum and treating Scotland as already separated.

'What would Edinburgh be without the rain?'

My favourite Moz gig ever happened in Edinburgh a few years ago with the unforgettable 'Auld Lang Syne' fan-singalong incident. It still makes me chortle. Such a great city. Really wished I'd pushed the boat out to get there last night now. Oh well! Moz vs Olympics coverage: tough call.

It seems that Morrissey's brief visit to our shores has ended well before he has his summer hiking holiday in the Alps. I've enjoyed my brief return to this site and will keep it under RSS for the next release of recordings.

Thanks again for a great review.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
My thanks to those who have offered such lovely comments about my "review".

Can I apologise for referring to "Shoplifters of the World Unite" as "Shoplifters of the World TONIGHT". A very silly mistake to make.

I also noticed a chap with an iPad. It not only caused a massive distraction/obstruction for those around him but it also served to make him look absolutely ridiculous. I don't think I have ever seen someone using an iPad in this way before and I hope I don't again.

Anyhoo. My thanks again for the lovely responses to my thoughts on a wonderful night.

When the guy with the iPad uploads to youtube, everybody will be happy. Hopefully he won't do it anymore now. I also filmed at a concert with my camera and the SMALLER people around me were actually happy about it, because it helped them to see on the display of my camera, what they otherwise could not see because of the heads in front of them.
 
V

Veg

Guest
Surprised no one has mentioned this, but I thought Kristeen Young was great.

Thanks
 

Iarwain

Member
Getting the audience to talk to him/the crowd was a great new interactive touch, surprised that wasn't thought of before. Glad he never passed the mic to me, I wouldn't know what the hell to say to him other than cliched "thanks", but if this continues people could prepare shit.

He actually did the same thing at Manchester the other night. I did the same as you though, couldn't think of something witty in time so I let it pass me by. Curse my brain, going blank in the heat of the moment. Regrets, I've had a few...
 

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