Article: "Kit" (full version) and "It's Hard To Walk Tall When You're Small" (different version) - m

Re: Here's the treats

The walk one is splendid, thanks. These recent acoustic takes are great.
 

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TheBoyWithTheDragonTattoo

Accountant, rampant.
If anyone would be willing to compile all of these unreleased tracks onto a CDR or two for me I'd happily reimburse you for your time, effort and the postage. My computer is on the fritz (it works, but barely) so I can't really download files at the moment and to be honest I'm not sure I have the organizational skills to cobble together all of the best versions of these songs- also, I prefer to have hard copies of everything. Message me if you're willing- thanks and Happy New Year!
 

roky

Well-Known Member
I want to give massive thanks to Peter, Mr. Reynolds and the others who have made these songs available. It has been a long time since I have posted here, but these songs made me want to come out of posting retirement to give thanks to you guys..
Thanks you, thank you, thank you.....
 

gonzax

Junior Member
It is very curious to see how Morrissey reused the lyrics to "it's hard...." for a totally different song. I love both tracks.

"Kit" would have been a decent b-side, not much more but I am really glad to finally hear it here.

Thanks a lot to everyone who's uploading all this wonderful stuff.
 
I love "Kit". Do we know if it is about a specific person? Jake? It's very biographical and it seems roughly similar in lyrics and composition to the wonderful "Sunny". Those London years were so good for Morrissey. Again thanks to the uploaders.
 

mcrickson

Reckless Endangerment
I love "Kit". Do we know if it is about a specific person? Jake? It's very biographical and it seems roughly similar in lyrics and composition to the wonderful "Sunny". Those London years were so good for Morrissey. Again thanks to the uploaders.
From what I remember, "Kit" was said to have been someone obsessed with Bowie.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest


Propietor of Billinge Cafe & Ice Cream Bar in Billinge/Wigan
 

Jamie

Bluff, Ardour & Assoc.
I did a little more "auditing" of the remaining known and/or apocryphal Maladjusted and subsequent B-sides sessions outtakes, checking both what was noted on Passions Just Like Mine and in Mozipedia:

I Know Who I Love - recorded during main Maladjusted session, with vocal
No One Can Hold A Candle To You (first version): PJLM suggests it was recorded during main Maladjusted session - inconclusive if vocal was recorded from entry, but assume one was if it was on early for-consideration tapes of the album.
I'm Not Worth Hitting - inconclusive that it was recorded (vocal or not); not listed in Mozipedia
The Leeches Go On Removing - backing track from main Maladjusted session, no vocal
Hanratty - rough demo at minimum recorded at B-sides session, possibly no vocal (PJLM says yes; Mozipedia not clear)
Nightmare - same as Hanratty

Given that the final two are also Spencer Cobrin compositions, it seems like it would be feasible that the early version of It's Hard To Walk Tall When You're Small sprang from the same DAT / disc - and that the ultimate source for the latter may have these as well.

I find it very interesting that Morrissey completed or at least attempted no less than FIVE Cobrin songs at the B-sides session in July 1997 (Lost, Now I Am a Was, It's Hard To Walk Tall..., Hanratty, Nightmare). He clearly was getting the hang of writing songs rather quickly. Some of the material he recorded later with Elva Snow would have fit quite cozily around Morrissey lyrics, too (e.g., Drinking & Driving, Hold Me, Could Ya)
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
The Leeches Go On Removing - backing track from main Maladjusted session, no vocal
Whilst there's no vocal recorded, the title is certainly intriguing. I wonder if Moz originally wrote lyrics for this song, then re-used them with different music a few years later for 'You Know I Couldn't Last'?
 

Detritus

Teenage Lightning
Given that the final two are also Spencer Cobrin compositions, it seems like it would be feasible that the early version of It's Hard To Walk Tall When You're Small sprang from the same DAT / disc - and that the ultimate source for the latter may have these as well.
Seems plausible. If this is the case, one wonders if any of these remaining recordings are floating around somewhere. "Hanratty" and "I Know Who I Love" are especially intriguing to me, for the subject matter and the title respectively.

I find it very interesting that Morrissey completed or at least attempted no less than FIVE Cobrin songs at the B-sides session in July 1997 (Lost, Now I Am a Was, It's Hard To Walk Tall..., Hanratty, Nightmare). He clearly was getting the hang of writing songs rather quickly. Some of the material he recorded later with Elva Snow would have fit quite cozily around Morrissey lyrics, too (e.g., Drinking & Driving, Hold Me, Could Ya)
In a way it's reminiscent of Jesse's ascendance in the band. He very quickly made the transition from replacement guitarist on tour to prominent songwriter and Morrissey muse. The difference, of course, is that a financial dispute prematurely ended the Cobrin/Morrissey songwriting partnership before it really had a chance to develop. It's a damn shame, as there was a lot of potential and promise there.

Whilst there's no vocal recorded, the title is certainly intriguing. I wonder if Moz originally wrote lyrics for this song, then re-used them with different music a few years later for 'You Know I Couldn't Last'?
This is my hunch as well.
 
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M

Musician

Guest
I did a little more "auditing" of the remaining known and/or apocryphal Maladjusted and subsequent B-sides sessions outtakes, checking both what was noted on Passions Just Like Mine and in Mozipedia:

I Know Who I Love - recorded during main Maladjusted session, with vocal
No One Can Hold A Candle To You (first version): PJLM suggests it was recorded during main Maladjusted session - inconclusive if vocal was recorded from entry, but assume one was if it was on early for-consideration tapes of the album.
I'm Not Worth Hitting - inconclusive that it was recorded (vocal or not); not listed in Mozipedia
The Leeches Go On Removing - backing track from main Maladjusted session, no vocal
Hanratty - includes at least rough vocal, recorded at B-sides session
Nightmare - same as Hanratty

Given that the final two are also Spencer Cobrin compositions, it seems like it would be feasible that the early version of It's Hard To Walk Tall When You're Small sprang from the same DAT / disc - and that the ultimate source for the latter may have these as well.

I find it very interesting that Morrissey completed or at least attempted no less than FIVE Cobrin songs at the B-sides session in July 1997 (Lost, Now I Am a Was, It's Hard To Walk Tall..., Hanratty, Nightmare). He clearly was getting the hang of writing songs rather quickly. Some of the material he recorded later with Elva Snow would have fit quite cozily around Morrissey lyrics, too (e.g., Drinking & Driving, Hold Me, Could Ya)
I was thinking about this last night. Maybe even deserves an own thread? A plea for a book that would have the input of all former ''Lad'': Boz, Alain, Spencer, Gary. As most of them are easily available via Facebbok, it might be not even that big of an effort. I am thinking about a book that would focus on recording, songwriting, the creative process, for all released and unreleased songs. Nothing juicy against Morrissey or anything like that. I can't see any issue the Man could have with it, since he would be merely mentioned as from the creative point of view, no personal stories, no secrets to be revealed. Not too techy, although some music fans might be interested in that, too (especially when it comes to Mick Ronson's producing.
 

Jamie

Bluff, Ardour & Assoc.
I was thinking about this last night. Maybe even deserves an own thread? A plea for a book that would have the input of all former ''Lad'': Boz, Alain, Spencer, Gary. As most of them are easily available via Facebbok, it might be not even that big of an effort. I am thinking about a book that would focus on recording, songwriting, the creative process, for all released and unreleased songs. Nothing juicy against Morrissey or anything like that. I can't see any issue the Man could have with it, since he would be merely mentioned as from the creative point of view, no personal stories, no secrets to be revealed. Not too techy, although some music fans might be interested in that, too (especially when it comes to Mick Ronson's producing.
To some degree, Julie Hamill touches on the songs and process in the 'Fifteen Minutes With...' interviews. But I think it would probably require a significant effort. Consider that Alain alone was responsible for ~80 released songs, not to speak of around a dozen or better unreleased songs. Alain, Gary, and Spencer have occasionally posted about particular songs and will generally contribute a comment or two when a song is posted to their Board. The holistic approach - commentary on each song and/or recording session from their time in the band - would probably be very time-consuming, for the writer(s) and the collaborators. That's not even to speak to the personal priorities they probably have that would push such a project down the to-do list - and the varying degrees of willingness to participate that would likely be encountered.

Don't get me wrong - I would be one of the first to buy such a book. And I would contribute to creating/compiling, if it was feasible. But I think Julie's interviews and the Mozipedia are the best we will have, for now. Of course, a good start would be hearing all the remaining outtakes / demos / alternate versions first. :lbf:
 

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