A little mention of Morrissey in The Guardian

moz'art girl

oh la la
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/sep/29/pulp
"British rock has very little by way of comparison, and is the poorer for it. Morrissey believed that Manchester had so much to answer for, and said so, but where are the other songwriters paying tribute, for better or worse, to their home towns?"
 

moz'art girl

oh la la
Again...:eek:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/sep/26/popandrock3
"Dressed from head to toe in black, with a store of glowering songs about murder, kidnappings, mental illness and funerals, White Lies are the latest pretenders to Joy Division's gloom-pop throne. And, because the well-spoken Chiswick trio drape their dark, literate tales around skyscraping hooks and galloping, radio-friendly choruses, they are definite contenders for big-league success in 2009.

When the band signed to the Universal offshoot Fiction in March following a classic A&R scrum, the label's managing director, Jim Chancellor, declared himself to be "over the f***ing moon". Nothing the band have done since will have dampened his enthusiasm. They have impressed on Later ... With Jools Holland, played several well-received festival slots, found their way on to Radio 1's daytime playlist and had Mark Ronson, Nick Cave (no relation to Charles) and Morrissey turn up to see them live.":confused:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2008/sep/18/grahamgreene.davidcameron
"It's strange to be the same age, and to share similar tastes to the probable next prime minister – the inexorable march of time and all that. Although never an avid Smiths fan, I admire Morrissey's lyrics … and Boz Boorer's guitar playing, while getting the New York Dolls back together for Meltdown deserves a knighthood in itself, which he'll probably soon get. ":eek:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/sep/04/whyrecordsshouldfacethevi
"Morrissey was right in some regards, though - we should smash the turntables, hang the DJs and make bonfires of the scratchy crap they worship in a mass abandonment of life-cluttering, natural resource-wasting, soul-restraining, spirit-encumbering, planet-raping, petite-bourgeois "stuff"."
 

moz'art girl

oh la la
I am probably mad...:cool:
http://www.411mania.com/music/columns/85472

"After a couple weeks' hiatus, 411Music's Top 5 comes back strong. We list off our top 5 songs from the 1980s, which, let's be honest, might be the best decade for music ever. Come in and leave your top 5, as well!"

[Morgan Marx]
1. The Smiths – "How Soon Is Now?" from Hatful of Hollow: I know, I know, not very original. But it was the first Smiths song I heard before I knew anything about the band (thanks Boston's WFNX "Leftover Lunch"). Johnny Marr's vibrato guitar latches onto the listener and doesn't let go. Morrissey is at his most sorrowful and his most poignant. I think everyone has experienced that feeling of going out full of promise, whether to a club or a concert, only to find yourself heading home alone. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to sob into a pillow.

Were the 80s really this depressing? To me, it was a time of Voltron and an NES system for kindergarten graduation and Thundercats and shoes with dinosaur tracks on the soles. For Curtis, Morrissey, Ian McCulloch and Dave Gahan it was a time of sexual insecurity, blackness, and haunting reverb. What a difference a generation makes.
 
Thank you for the links. :)

'If I like Graham Greene and David Cameron likes Graham Greene, am I a Tory?' Haha

White Lies, eh?
whitelies.jpg

Spot the difference
l_435f717a1f0ba02a8a10ac042c3f0540.gif


:cool:
 
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