Sam Cooke

Sam Cooke

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Sam Cooke (born 22 January 1931, Clarksdale, Mississippi, USA - died December 11, 1964, Los Angeles, California, USA) was an American gospel/R&B/soul/pop singer, songwriter and entrepreneur. He is recognized as one of the founders of soul music and one of the most important singers in soul music history. Details about his death are still in dispute; official police records state he was killed by a gunshot. Younger brother of Charles Cook (who co-wrote Chain Gang) and elder brother of L.C. Cook.

Inducted into Rock And Roll Hall of Fame in 1986 (Performer). Inducted into Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1987.

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Samuel Cooke (January 22, 1931 – December 11, 1964), known professionally as Sam Cooke, was an American singer and songwriter. Considered one of the most influential soul artists of all time, Cooke is commonly referred to as the "King of Soul" for his distinctive vocals, pioneering contributions to the genre, and significance in popular music. During his eight-year career, Cooke released 29 singles that charted in the Top 40 of the Billboard Pop Singles chart, as well as 20 singles in the Top Ten of Billboard's Black Singles chart. In 1964, Cooke was shot and killed by the manager of a motel in Los Angeles. After an inquest and investigation, the courts ruled Cooke's death to be a justifiable homicide. His family has since questioned the circumstances of his death. Cooke is included on Billboard's 2015 list of the 35 greatest R&B artists of all time.