Morrissey Central "Yes, I Am Blind" (February 3, 2020)

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Remember this was a point-to-point structural rip-off of Gilbert O'Sullivan's 'Nothing Rhymed'.

But something rhymed - the title.

Fully expect the usual trolls to vote this down. But they will have to concede - I am right. And that's why it made it into the Mozipedia.
 
Remember this was a point-to-point structural rip-off of Gilbert O'Sullivan's 'Nothing Rhymed'.
I think this is one occasion where Goddard forgot to take off his cloth ears. To me it bears very little resemblance to 'Nothing Rhymed,' not least because that song is a classic and 'Yes, I Am Blind' is not.
 
I think this is one occasion where Goddard forgot to take off his cloth ears. To me it bears very little resemblance to 'Nothing Rhymed,' not least because that song is a classic and 'Yes, I Am Blind' is not.
Oh it absolutely is. Speed one up to the other, and they match perfectly. Even the stuttering at the end of the verse.
 
Remember this was a point-to-point structural rip-off of Gilbert O'Sullivan's 'Nothing Rhymed'.

But something rhymed - the title.

Fully expect the usual trolls to vote this down. But they will have to concede - I am right. And that's why it made it into the Mozipedia.
That kinda stuff comes from the folk, blues and country tradition of buildin' off somethin' else.
Ya know the famous Johnny Cash line "Shot a man in Reno, just to watch him die".
That comes from Jimmie Rodgers "I'm gonna shot poor Thelma, just to see her jump and fall".
Jimmie might of even got it from somewhere else.
 
"The tune was from a batch of demos that former Smiths bassist Andy Rourke had supplied Morrissey in the spring of 1989, sharing an autumnal melody and plodding tempo with Gilbert O’Sullivan’s 1970 hit ‘NOTHING RHYMED’; it therefore seems more than coincidence that Morrissey should cover the latter in 2002. It was unfortunate that Rourke himself never played on the record, undoubtedly the best of his three Morrissey co-writes. Instead, session bassist Matthew Seligman and guitarist Kevin ARMSTRONG faithfully copied the arrangement of Rourke’s original cassette. The song’s recording was particularly significant in establishing Morrissey’s relationship with new producers Clive LANGER and Alan Winstanley. Initially unhappy with their work on ‘Ouija Board’, the singer was considering aborting the session until he heard their foundations for ‘Yes, I Am Blind’ and changed his mind; hearing its lyrical metaphor of ‘little lamb’, Langer and Winstanley would humorously refer to it thereafter as ‘the one about the sheep’."

Regards,
FWD.
 
A
Remember this was a point-to-point structural rip-off of Gilbert O'Sullivan's 'Nothing Rhymed'.

But something rhymed - the title.

Fully expect the usual trolls to vote this down. But they will have to concede - I am right. And that's why it made it into the Mozipedia.
Ah, you and Simon Goddard. Remember or well.
 
A
Remember this was a point-to-point structural rip-off of Gilbert O'Sullivan's 'Nothing Rhymed'.

But something rhymed - the title.

Fully expect the usual trolls to vote this down. But they will have to concede - I am right. And that's why it made it into the Mozipedia.
What's your point?
 
The tune was from a batch of demos that former Smiths bassist Andy Rourke had supplied Morrissey in the spring of 1989, sharing an autumnal melody and plodding tempo with Gilbert O’Sullivan’s 1970 hit ‘NOTHING RHYMED’; it therefore seems more than coincidence that Morrissey should cover the latter in 2002. It was unfortunate that Rourke himself never played on the record, undoubtedly the best of his three Morrissey co-writes. Instead, session bassist Matthew Seligman and guitarist Kevin ARMSTRONG faithfully copied the arrangement of Rourke’s original cassette. The song’s recording was particularly significant in establishing Morrissey’s relationship with new producers Clive LANGER and Alan Winstanley. Initially unhappy with their work on ‘Ouija Board’, the singer was considering aborting the session until he heard their foundations for ‘Yes, I Am Blind’ and changed his mind; hearing its lyrical metaphor of ‘little lamb’, Langer and Winstanley would humorously refer to it thereafter as ‘the one about the sheep’.

Regards,
FWD.
And was ‘Girl least likely to’ also just a coincidence. Remembering what Alain said in a recent podcast about Moz
suggesting a Ramones type song and Alain coming up with ‘Fatty’. And I’m sure ‘Certain People’ was a coincidence too. :rolleyes:

I think Morrissey sometimes may make suggestions to the writers he is working with because he is looking for a specific mood to fit the words he wants to use, but not all of the time. This is not unusual amongst music collaborators.
 
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