What's Everyone Reading At The Moment?

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Guest
Almost done inside story and it was a welcome conversation even if I would have preferred perhaps a straight novel. Just have the addendum to read. So I don’t know much about Christopher hitchens aside from his connection to amis and I did indeed think he had committed suicide. Maybe I was thinking of his mother. It sounds a bit weird to write I was happy to hear he died of cancer but I was happy to read that his death wasn’t from suicide. Going in with my false belief and amis talking about suicidal ideation being in his mind early in the book I thought this was foreshadowing and cemented the idea even more so when I did reach the end I did get a little surprise from a book that I didn’t think was gonna surprise me at all. Almost a happy ending or maybe just a happier one given the subject. A pleasure to read as always
 
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It weird to think I might not read another amis long novel. I did enjoy the borges quote at the end about so many people miss the wonder and glamour of the observable world.

now reading bel ami by guy de Maupassant
 

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent
31obVhLz2LL.jpg
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
An article from 2007 with an interesting Astra-Zeneca mention:
Beware, Pharma.
Beware, Pharma - How the Industry Manipulates Doctors and Deceives Patients
DeepL translator
Would the Stern magazine publish such a critical article in 2021? Most likely not.
 
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HoSo

Guest
Did you like it?
Joan is a beautiful writer, though more journalistic in style. You know she was married to Dominic Dunnes bro Joh. Forgive spelling. I recently read The Devil and Karl Marx, someone asked me about it, all I could remember at that point is that he lived in Soho and had weeping boils on his bottom. Funny what the mind retains.
 
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Did you like it?

I haven’t been able to finish it yet. I got seventy pages in and lost the book somewhere which seems impossible to me but there ya go. I did like the book so far with the opening murder and then the retrospective. It made me think of Americana by delillo. She has a way of making her characters fear of aimlessness seem very authentic. The main characters fear that she’ll disappoint her grandfather with her lack of personal manifested destiny is apparent right from the start and that anxiety seems present in almost everything she does from trying to choose a husband to school to almost all of her personal relationships. I do understand the whole rural roots mythology that communities live with and the weird feelings people have when they do obvious thing to the contrary that benefit them though I’m an east coaster and not from California. I had to fly out somewhere before I’ve had a chance to replace it so I brought a couple of other books to read in the meantime
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
I haven’t been able to finish it yet. I got seventy pages in and lost the book somewhere which seems impossible to me but there ya go. I did like the book so far with the opening murder and then the retrospective. It made me think of Americana by delillo. She has a way of making her characters fear of aimlessness seem very authentic. The main characters fear that she’ll disappoint her grandfather with her lack of personal manifested destiny is apparent right from the start and that anxiety seems present in almost everything she does from trying to choose a husband to school to almost all of her personal relationships. I do understand the whole rural roots mythology that communities live with and the weird feelings people have when they do obvious thing to the contrary that benefit them though I’m an east coaster and not from California. I had to fly out somewhere before I’ve had a chance to replace it so I brought a couple of other books to read in the meantime
It seems interesting. Thanks!
 
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Anonymous

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I'm reading The Book of Accidents by Chuck Wendig. Really digging this. Been a fan of Chuck since reading his Miriam Black novels. There are still signed copies available on Waterstones and Forbidden Planet.
 

Light Housework

useless eater
I just reread the story of the woman who was killed on her way home from a Morrissey concert. A guy impersonated a cop, abducted, raped, beat her, and put her in a freezer.
 
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No 27

Guest
I'm working my way through all of the books by David Sedaris. Read three, so far, and just ordered another today. He's very, very funny.
 
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My wife really likes both sedaris authors

finished run river and it was very good. I read play it as it lays because Ellis said it was an influence on his prose style for less than zero but I see much more of his work rooted in run river. Not so much stylistically but the passivity of Lilly’s character and her anxiety and unfounded fear of everything (Lilly sees a man open a door for her and thinks she has a complex situation on her hands) the aimlessness the character possesses in the shadow of manifest destiny pushed by her father and the prevailing culture. Ryder Channing with his sympathetic facade and ambition with fear of inevitable failure and fear of lacking a standard running rampant just slow the surface. It was very very good. Read ask the dust after that and it was just ok. Had a really good forward by bukowski. Now reading the post boy by Thomas Wolfe. It was a version I hadn’t read before. Not the red book version and not the version collected in his short story collection I have which is different than the Redbook version
 
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Buybuysolo

Guest
For fear of sounding like Ms Lumpgrass, I’ve just finished Hollywood Gomorrah by Skip E. Lowe, the first two chapters were absolute filth. 🤢 🤮 I persevered till the end. Not saying anymore or I’ll be accused of being a homosapienphobe. Some of the gossip was interesting though. But, only if it’s true 🤔
 
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books wit no pitchers but not much more just fuck off literary ponces long live books more to life than books nerds n squares obscurer and obscurer shakespeare is smart
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