Tony Fletcher (author of A Light That Never Goes Out) recommends black music, but...


Excerpt:

The Smiths? There’s more blackness in the music than you might initially perceive. Read about it. Search it out. And then boycott Morrissey’s music because he’s turned into your horrible racist grandfather. Seriously, stop apologizing for the guy and stop listening to his recent music. He’s an embarrassment.
 
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V

Vegan. Cro. Spirit. 888

Guest
He wore a For Britain badge - a party that endorses and indeed promotes anti-Islamic policies. I am a Muslim and a long-standing Moz fan since 1983 (I’m 55 years old). I have given up on his music and what he stands for. He’s traduced my soul and I feel utterly betrayed, not only by the dyspeptic tone of much of his recent actual music but by the confused and disturbing racism he now espouses. How dare he putatively “support” BLM and quote the esteemed James Baldwin and not renounce that vile badge and the party it endorses. Morrissey was once part of the solution to many things in my and others’ lives now he is very much part of the problem.

?

You are 100 percent muslim skinny?
that is true.
i dont think muslims are allowed to 'traduce' their souls.:lbf:
 

ACTON

Don't Leave Us In The Dark
He said Obama is probably white inside.
Racist scumbag he is.
How is that racist? Moz was disappointed that Obama didn't live up to the hype or change things enough. He probably thought Obama sold out to the pressures of status quo oligarchs. Of course you can't say anything anymore without upsetting people more sensitive than cat whiskers.
 

terrancestamp

Active Member
I'm sick of people telling us what to do. He can stop listening to Moz. That's his right. It's not his right to tell me not to listen. He can take a run and jump.

I agree and who the hell is he anyway???? You wrote a book on R.E.M. give him a medal someone. He puts his pants on the same way as everyone else on the site does.
 

terrancestamp

Active Member
He wore a For Britain badge - a party that endorses and indeed promotes anti-Islamic policies. I am a Muslim and a long-standing Moz fan since 1983 (I’m 55 years old). I have given up on his music and what he stands for. He’s traduced my soul and I feel utterly betrayed, not only by the dyspeptic tone of much of his recent actual music but by the confused and disturbing racism he now espouses. How dare he putatively “support” BLM and quote the esteemed James Baldwin and not renounce that vile badge and the party it endorses. Morrissey was once part of the solution to many things in my and others’ lives now he is very much part of the problem.

You have every right to feel the way that you do and it is certainly understandable. This type of post and Tony's article are so frustrating. Not everyone and everything is so "black and white". People can be racist and have friends of ethnicity. Black/Asian/Mexican people can be racist. Some people are bi-sexual. We just live in this world where people don't have the time or won't make the time to look at the issues. They just want to put everything and everyone in a box within 5 seconds of meeting them. If someone says one thing that makes you think, you dismiss it immediately.

I don't have to agree with everything Morrissey says. I am particularly not a fan of "Yes, I Am Blind", but I don't run around yelling Morrissey hates Christians and don't listen to his music. Maybe you yourself overlooked "Bengali In Platforms" back in the late 80's?

If Morrissey can't support 'For Brittan' then nobody can support the Republican Party. He is not responsible for every action they make. That is crazy! Just like any Republican is not responsible for the actions of that party.

Give it a rest won't you...…...
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
I'm sick of people telling us what to do. He can stop listening to Moz. That's his right. It's not his right to tell me not to listen. He can take a run and jump.

Me too, especially when it is done by people who made some money on the back of Morrissey. He is entitled to have his opinion and to say that he doesn't listen to Morrissey's music anymore, but why call for boycotting Morrissey's music? My intuition says he wants to protect his reputation as a writer on the subject of music in an environment that is dominated by liberals. It is sad but we will have to live with it.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Me too, especially when it is done by people who made some money on the back of Morrissey. He is entitled to have his opinion and to say that he doesn't listen to Morrissey's music anymore, but why call for boycotting Morrissey's music? My intuition says he wants to protect his reputation as a writer on the subject of music in an environment that is dominated by liberals. It is sad but we will have to live with it.
My intuition is Fletcher's a fud.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Marr was influenced by Nile Rodgers (& Chic)...Hand In Glove was one such case.
It might as well have been Ginger Rodgers because 99.9% of Smiths fans have no interest in Chic or if you come from Glasgow pronounced Chick!
 
B

Bilal Hakim Murad

Guest
You have every right to feel the way that you do and it is certainly understandable. This type of post and Tony's article are so frustrating. Not everyone and everything is so "black and white". People can be racist and have friends of ethnicity. Black/Asian/Mexican people can be racist. Some people are bi-sexual. We just live in this world where people don't have the time or won't make the time to look at the issues. They just want to put everything and everyone in a box within 5 seconds of meeting them. If someone says one thing that makes you think, you dismiss it immediately.

I don't have to agree with everything Morrissey says. I am particularly not a fan of "Yes, I Am Blind", but I don't run around yelling Morrissey hates Christians and don't listen to his music. Maybe you yourself overlooked "Bengali In Platforms" back in the late 80's?

If Morrissey can't support 'For Brittan' then nobody can support the Republican Party. He is not responsible for every action they make. That is crazy! Just like any Republican is not responsible for the actions of that party.

Give it a rest won't you...…...
That’s a really interesting response, and I am sympathetic to much of your reasoning and tone.
The grey zones between the absolute black and white certainties is where we all live, at least in our heads even if we proclaim otherwise on the streets, in our homes or God forbid in these forums.
That said, I do feel much less nuanced in my mind, thoughts, utterances and actions when anyone gives support for a party or view that when examined is palpably untrue, or harmful, hateful or more simply misleading.
There are times and moments in our lives when the grey zones of complicated debate do give way, at least in the first instance, to a more direct unequivocal response.
When Morrissey wore the FB badge, I strangely felt I had to rush to his defence when my wife asked me what I thought of it. Within minutes my defence - he was being a hetrodoxical libertarian outlier and all the other terrible knots of self denial I could muster - were vaporised by looking on the FB website and at their anti-Islam policies.
Of course he can wear what he wants and we can all support political parties as we see fit but those assertions of our freedom and individuality are at all times ripe for questioning and challenging.
My own faith and religion - which I often think about and challenge, lest in my own household and with friends of similar and very different backgrounds - is a case in point.

As for Bengali In Platforms: I was in my early twenties at the time, and my girlfriend at the time was of Bengali descent and a Hindu, and we both really enjoyed the frisson in the song - the amalgamation of the immigrant not really fitting in with the idea that life is struggle enough even when you’re born here - sung with love and tenderness. Neither me, her nor our parents thought it was overtly racist. My father (born in India but now Pakistan) loved Morrissey’s voice and the violin in this song, and said that Moz was right indeed for “life is hard enough when you belong here”.

Our family were abused and humiliated when the National Front marched down our street in the 1970s, and their descendants now seek legitimation in parties like For Britain and in more recently mainstream ones like UKIP and Boris Johnson’s Tory party.
So yes, it’s a nuanced world sometimes, and at others, there’s a tipping point when love and adoration (mine of Morrissey, early 80s until the last year or so) collapse and the soufflé of one’s admiration is reduced to an embarrassing mess. This time, for me, is now.
I’ve played his version of Joni’s Don’t Interrupt The Sorrow these last few days and I’ve wept, for him, for me, for all of us.
Peace.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><>
Me too, especially when it is done by people who made some money on the back of Morrissey. He is entitled to have his opinion and to say that he doesn't listen to Morrissey's music anymore, but why call for boycotting Morrissey's music? My intuition says he wants to protect his reputation as a writer on the subject of music in an environment that is dominated by liberals. It is sad but we will have to live with it.


It’s all about the :moneybag::moneybag::moneybag::moneybag:

anytime some no one or has been says anything about Morrissey
they know they are assured some press publicity to help their ‘career’.


Coattail clowns, all of them.
 
V

Vegan. Cro. Spirit. 888

Guest
That’s a really interesting response, and I am sympathetic to much of your reasoning and tone.
The grey zones between the absolute black and white certainties is where we all live, at least in our heads even if we proclaim otherwise on the streets, in our homes or God forbid in these forums.
That said, I do feel much less nuanced in my mind, thoughts, utterances and actions when anyone gives support for a party or view that when examined is palpably untrue, or harmful, hateful or more simply misleading.
There are times and moments in our lives when the grey zones of complicated debate do give way, at least in the first instance, to a more direct unequivocal response.
When Morrissey wore the FB badge, I strangely felt I had to rush to his defence when my wife asked me what I thought of it. Within minutes my defence - he was being a hetrodoxical libertarian outlier and all the other terrible knots of self denial I could muster - were vaporised by looking on the FB website and at their anti-Islam policies.
Of course he can wear what he wants and we can all support political parties as we see fit but those assertions of our freedom and individuality are at all times ripe for questioning and challenging.
My own faith and religion - which I often think about and challenge, lest in my own household and with friends of similar and very different backgrounds - is a case in point.

As for Bengali In Platforms: I was in my early twenties at the time, and my girlfriend at the time was of Bengali descent and a Hindu, and we both really enjoyed the frisson in the song - the amalgamation of the immigrant not really fitting in with the idea that life is struggle enough even when you’re born here - sung with love and tenderness. Neither me, her nor our parents thought it was overtly racist. My father (born in India but now Pakistan) loved Morrissey’s voice and the violin in this song, and said that Moz was right indeed for “life is hard enough when you belong here”.

Our family were abused and humiliated when the National Front marched down our street in the 1970s, and their descendants now seek legitimation in parties like For Britain and in more recently mainstream ones like UKIP and Boris Johnson’s Tory party.
So yes, it’s a nuanced world sometimes, and at others, there’s a tipping point when love and adoration (mine of Morrissey, early 80s until the last year or so) collapse and the soufflé of one’s admiration is reduced to an embarrassing mess. This time, for me, is now.
I’ve played his version of Joni’s Don’t Interrupt The Sorrow these last few days and I’ve wept, for him, for me, for all of us.
Peace.

:lbf:

this is funnier than the Benny stuff.?
 
T

The Ghost of Eddie Large

Guest
The horrible racist grandfather... who dedicated a relatively recent album to his deceased friend, a black civil rights activist, and has for years criticised the treatment of black people by the authorities in America. You'd think that someone would probably only do that if they weren't racist... but don't be deceived by this elaborate trick - it just means the opposite ?
 

terrancestamp

Active Member
That’s a really interesting response, and I am sympathetic to much of your reasoning and tone.
The grey zones between the absolute black and white certainties is where we all live, at least in our heads even if we proclaim otherwise on the streets, in our homes or God forbid in these forums.
That said, I do feel much less nuanced in my mind, thoughts, utterances and actions when anyone gives support for a party or view that when examined is palpably untrue, or harmful, hateful or more simply misleading.
There are times and moments in our lives when the grey zones of complicated debate do give way, at least in the first instance, to a more direct unequivocal response.
When Morrissey wore the FB badge, I strangely felt I had to rush to his defence when my wife asked me what I thought of it. Within minutes my defence - he was being a hetrodoxical libertarian outlier and all the other terrible knots of self denial I could muster - were vaporised by looking on the FB website and at their anti-Islam policies.
Of course he can wear what he wants and we can all support political parties as we see fit but those assertions of our freedom and individuality are at all times ripe for questioning and challenging.
My own faith and religion - which I often think about and challenge, lest in my own household and with friends of similar and very different backgrounds - is a case in point.

As for Bengali In Platforms: I was in my early twenties at the time, and my girlfriend at the time was of Bengali descent and a Hindu, and we both really enjoyed the frisson in the song - the amalgamation of the immigrant not really fitting in with the idea that life is struggle enough even when you’re born here - sung with love and tenderness. Neither me, her nor our parents thought it was overtly racist. My father (born in India but now Pakistan) loved Morrissey’s voice and the violin in this song, and said that Moz was right indeed for “life is hard enough when you belong here”.

Our family were abused and humiliated when the National Front marched down our street in the 1970s, and their descendants now seek legitimation in parties like For Britain and in more recently mainstream ones like UKIP and Boris Johnson’s Tory party.
So yes, it’s a nuanced world sometimes, and at others, there’s a tipping point when love and adoration (mine of Morrissey, early 80s until the last year or so) collapse and the soufflé of one’s admiration is reduced to an embarrassing mess. This time, for me, is now.
I’ve played his version of Joni’s Don’t Interrupt The Sorrow these last few days and I’ve wept, for him, for me, for all of us.
Peace.


Thank you for your response. I enjoyed reading it and knowing what life was like for you on your journey as a Morrissey fan! This site can actually be a positive place with free flowing ideas and intelligence with open minds. I think that is what America is needing right now. To hear people when they talk or walk! Thanks again.
 

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