"These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage" - brief Morrissey interview - El Comercio

A publication he's spoken to before.
Via translate - so take with a pinch of salt:

Morrissey: "Son días de indignación moral salvajemente superficial" -
El Comercio Perú

By José Tsang, Nov. 23, 2018.

5bf80d387753f.jpeg


Morrissey:
"These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage"

Before his concert in Peru, the former The Smiths answers a questionnaire to refer to "El cóndor pasa", Venezuela, his intoxication in Lima and other issues.

The healthy exercise of thinking differently seems devalued. In music, an illustrious member of that minority club is called Morrissey . The media usually highlight their statements and the 59-year-old British artist defends himself with his songs. His latest album, "Low in High School" (2017), includes a song like "Spent the Day in Bed", which states: "Stop watching the news / Because the news manages to scare you / To make you feel small and alone / To make you feel that your mind is not yours. "

The contribution to the music of Morrissey is unquestionable: the band The Smiths is one of the best acts of the 80s, and his solo career also generates admiration. On the other hand, his opinions produce resistance, either because of his militant veganism or to criticize current feminism because he believes that he does not aspire to reach a higher intellectual level.


Morrissey - confessed by a scathing writer like Oscar Wilde - will offer a new concert in Peru this Tuesday, November 27. Before the evening, the singer and composer answered in writing a questionnaire from El Comercio. Among the issues addressed, the figure of intoxication in Lima in 2013.

-The Pretenders played in Lima a few months ago. At the concert, his singer Chrissie Hynde said that you are one of his favorite composers. What inspires you? And what does "Back on the Chain Gang" - you just make a cover of this song by The Pretenders - for you?

Chrissie and I have been friends for years. She is an impressive composer who can bring an unusual feeling to her songs, while most writers copy what has been successful. She is determined and does not have that paranoia to do or say what others believe is right.

-The world of music has changed. The physical disk is disappearing. How not to lose faith in these times? Is it a lost battle? Can we be optimists?

People will always find music and will need it, but at the same time I think they are all exhausted by the promotional machinery that drives the same faces with the same content. There is no more that thing called natural success. Every move is made. We constantly look at what number 1 is and we do not believe in it even for a second. We are tired of hearing about artists who sell millions, although we know that such artists do not inspire love for music.

-In this final phase of 2018, what is Oscar Wilde's phrase that comes to mind the most?

What we fear is what happens to us.

-Let's talk about your last album "Low in High School". What musical spirit did you look for in it?

I'm interested in making songs that start conversations, which is easy in these days of savagely superficial moral outrage that everyone seems to want to express. If you offer a song to people, you should raise their lives for at least four minutes; otherwise, it does not make sense. The greatest honor I receive is when they tell me: "Nobody could have written that song, except you".

-A song like "Who Will Protect Us From The Police?" (Who will protect us from the police?) Is dedicated to Venezuela. What is your point of view about your situation?

Last year I often saw television images in which the Venezuelan police attacked people, which was because they were tired - as you know - of economic corruption. I wondered what gives the police the right to attack people, which rather pays the police for their protection. It seems to me that whenever the people have had enough of the dishonest governments, the police begin to attack the citizens, but they do not attack the dishonest government. How is this fair or civilized? Governments do not pay the police. People do it.

-In your last concert in Lima, in 2015, you sang "El cóndor pasa". Why did you choose this song?

I feel that it has a great moral virtue for the people of Peru; It's like a hand on the shoulder. We all want freedom, we do not want to be the snail or the nail [the phrase in English presents a play on words: "We do not want to be the snail or the nail"], and we imagine that the birds that pass have the final freedom . The song is obviously very old, but it still means a lot because every day we see and hear people who cry out for freedom. Why is it so difficult to get it?

- Fortunately, the episode of poisoning in Peru, in 2013, was overcome. You said you were "officially dead for nine minutes". What did you see in those nine minutes?

When you survive a terrible disease, you recover your health but you realize the unbearable meddling of society in your life, your money, your body and your thoughts, just as you see that we have almost no right to relax and be ourselves. People do not seem to realize that just a sneeze separates us from death. We are willing to live as slaves in one way or another, persistently doing what has been said by people we do not respect. We are all slaves in many ways.

-What can we expect from your new concert in Lima?

I say what I believe and I say it well. Music brings us closer to other people who share our beliefs. If they come to the concert without expecting anything, they will be disappointed.


Regards,
FWD.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comments

countthree

Obvious person
Suicide is a sin? The ones who have taken their own lives have suffered enough. How about letting up on the judgement and let them have their rest in peace they deserve.

In other news near death experiences are a surge of adrenalin coupled with the undying willingness for the human brain to fool itself even beyond the hospital bed as it seems. There is no next step. This is the only step there is. Get in line and enjoy.
Yes, suicide is morally wrong when you have people around you that you are supposed to take care of. It's a matter of personal responsibility, and you have to assume it despite any suffering. If you don't want to live for yourself you must live for others who depend on you. That's why when governments destroy family relationships and social ties by disproportionately increasing the size and functions of the state they are creating an epidemic of suicides in two ways. First, they are ruining people's economy with high taxes and socialism, and second they are depriving people of their purpose in life, which historically has been to take care of their family and their tribe in a direct way and not through the state in every situation of life. Oversized states treat all people like children. They are not the big brother, they are the big daddy, who takes things from and gives things to people accordingly to its own will and interests. Smart, independent and mature people are being transformed in suffering puppets with limited choices in life. One of those few choices -the wrong path, as I see it- is suicide. That's why I said, summarizing, that suicide is a sin. That's why I think if we are catholics we can't be socialists. Our only big father is in heaven, not seated in the chair of a president, prime minister or king, overwhelmingly deciding about all aspects of human life. Axe the monarchy et al, by the way.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm not sure about your first two sentences. As Morrissey said, "People will always find music and will need it." He is right about this. I know I did when I was younger.
Live music especially is the best of all the arts because it combines visual, sonic, intellectual (sometimes) and emotional components all in one performance. I have left concerts feeling so entertained and moved in a way that no movie, or play, or art exhibit ever could.
Well expressed - you will often hear people leaving a concert saying that it was the best night of their life. No-one ever says that on the way home from the gallery, theatre or cinema.
 

evennow

Writers on the storm
Well expressed - you will often hear people leaving a concert saying that it was the best night of their life. No-one ever says that on the way home from the gallery, theatre or cinema.
Yes! I can remember distinctly standing in front of the stage at the House of Blues in Las Vegas watching Psychedelic Furs/Echo and The Bunnymen, Romantics, and Morrissey concerts and being transported beyond myself in a way that could and will never be matched by any other entertainment form.

The immediacy and power of live music is one that if you thoroughly enjoy the songs can be life changing...lasting at least as long as the ringing in your ears! PS. Thank you to The Cure for that two days.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
That's a very interesting story - and obviously a very powerful experience - but it's impossible to verify in medical terms if there weren't any other people present. When we're ill the brain can create all kinds of weirdness, particularly in the case of poisoning. I do think it's possible to be 'hovering' between life and death and have these experiences, though. But in Morrissey's case, I am sceptical; even if he did have CPR for 9 minutes (which seems unlikely), I can't see how he would have got on a plane the next day.
But did he actually get on a plane the next day? This is inferred by one poster here and accepted as fact.
 

Peppermint

Well-Known Member
But did he actually get on a plane the next day? This is inferred by one poster here and accepted as fact.
This article explains the timing. It is dated Thursday 11th July. It says the tour was due to begin on Tuesday 9th, and he flew home the day before it was due to begin (Monday 8th); the concert promoter quoted said that the 'poisoning' happened when they went out for dinner on the Sunday. So, if this is correct, yes, the next day.
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/jul/11/morrissey-cancels-south-american-tour-food-poisoning
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
A publication he's spoken to before.
Via translate - so take with a pinch of salt:

Morrissey: "Son días de indignación moral salvajemente superficial" -
El Comercio Perú

By José Tsang, Nov. 23, 2018.

View attachment 46505


Morrissey:
"These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage"

Before his concert in Peru, the former The Smiths answers a questionnaire to refer to "El cóndor pasa", Venezuela, his intoxication in Lima and other issues.

The healthy exercise of thinking differently seems devalued. In music, an illustrious member of that minority club is called Morrissey . The media usually highlight their statements and the 59-year-old British artist defends himself with his songs. His latest album, "Low in High School" (2017), includes a song like "Spent the Day in Bed", which states: "Stop watching the news / Because the news manages to scare you / To make you feel small and alone / To make you feel that your mind is not yours. "

The contribution to the music of Morrissey is unquestionable: the band The Smiths is one of the best acts of the 80s, and his solo career also generates admiration. On the other hand, his opinions produce resistance, either because of his militant veganism or to criticize current feminism because he believes that he does not aspire to reach a higher intellectual level.


Morrissey - confessed by a scathing writer like Oscar Wilde - will offer a new concert in Peru this Tuesday, November 27. Before the evening, the singer and composer answered in writing a questionnaire from El Comercio. Among the issues addressed, the figure of intoxication in Lima in 2013.

-The Pretenders played in Lima a few months ago. At the concert, his singer Chrissie Hynde said that you are one of his favorite composers. What inspires you? And what does "Back on the Chain Gang" - you just make a cover of this song by The Pretenders - for you?

Chrissie and I have been friends for years. She is an impressive composer who can bring an unusual feeling to her songs, while most writers copy what has been successful. She is determined and does not have that paranoia to do or say what others believe is right.

-The world of music has changed. The physical disk is disappearing. How not to lose faith in these times? Is it a lost battle? Can we be optimists?

People will always find music and will need it, but at the same time I think they are all exhausted by the promotional machinery that drives the same faces with the same content. There is no more that thing called natural success. Every move is made. We constantly look at what number 1 is and we do not believe in it even for a second. We are tired of hearing about artists who sell millions, although we know that such artists do not inspire love for music.

-In this final phase of 2018, what is Oscar Wilde's phrase that comes to mind the most?

What we fear is what happens to us.

-Let's talk about your last album "Low in High School". What musical spirit did you look for in it?

I'm interested in making songs that start conversations, which is easy in these days of savagely superficial moral outrage that everyone seems to want to express. If you offer a song to people, you should raise their lives for at least four minutes; otherwise, it does not make sense. The greatest honor I receive is when they tell me: "Nobody could have written that song, except you".

-A song like "Who Will Protect Us From The Police?" (Who will protect us from the police?) Is dedicated to Venezuela. What is your point of view about your situation?

Last year I often saw television images in which the Venezuelan police attacked people, which was because they were tired - as you know - of economic corruption. I wondered what gives the police the right to attack people, which rather pays the police for their protection. It seems to me that whenever the people have had enough of the dishonest governments, the police begin to attack the citizens, but they do not attack the dishonest government. How is this fair or civilized? Governments do not pay the police. People do it.

-In your last concert in Lima, in 2015, you sang "El cóndor pasa". Why did you choose this song?

I feel that it has a great moral virtue for the people of Peru; It's like a hand on the shoulder. We all want freedom, we do not want to be the snail or the nail [the phrase in English presents a play on words: "We do not want to be the snail or the nail"], and we imagine that the birds that pass have the final freedom . The song is obviously very old, but it still means a lot because every day we see and hear people who cry out for freedom. Why is it so difficult to get it?

- Fortunately, the episode of poisoning in Peru, in 2013, was overcome. You said you were "officially dead for nine minutes". What did you see in those nine minutes?

When you survive a terrible disease, you recover your health but you realize the unbearable meddling of society in your life, your money, your body and your thoughts, just as you see that we have almost no right to relax and be ourselves. People do not seem to realize that just a sneeze separates us from death. We are willing to live as slaves in one way or another, persistently doing what has been said by people we do not respect. We are all slaves in many ways.

-What can we expect from your new concert in Lima?

I say what I believe and I say it well. Music brings us closer to other people who share our beliefs. If they come to the concert without expecting anything, they will be disappointed.


Regards,
FWD.
ALL he should a said was , " Chupola Grande "
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
This article explains the timing. It is dated Thursday 11th July. It says the tour was due to begin on Tuesday 9th, and he flew home the day before it was due to begin (Monday 8th); the concert promoter quoted said that the 'poisoning' happened when they went out for dinner on the Sunday. So, if this is correct, yes, the next day.
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/jul/11/morrissey-cancels-south-american-tour-food-poisoning
It may be that the Guardian got it wrong. Below is Morrissey's own message posted on True to you which mentions that he has returned to LA. It is probably Boz who returned to the UK shortly after the incident, as he always does.

See the luck I've had - true-to-you.net
12 July 2013
I can't give words to the sorrow I feel at the loss of perfect Peru. Oh, black cloud. After such a victorious and uplifting welcome of Lima love, the contaminated jinx had its way via a simple restaurant meal of penne pasta and tomato. Three hours later, both I, and security Liam have collapsed with a deadly and delirious bedridden disease. Five days of round-the-clock medical supervision just barely controls the corrosively toxic food poisoning. I know my luck too well. Sorrow replaces joy, and in every dream home a heartache. It could only be me.
I have returned to Los Angeles and to the expert supervision of my doctor Jeremy Fine, who assures me that I shall be fine (although not in the gossamer, powdery sense) for our upcoming shows in Argentina and Brazil. I have absolutely no idea where my beloved Chile has gone. In the heat of cancellations and postponements, the humiliation and mortification I feel on a personal level is too mammoth to be measured. If my spirits climb down any lower I could never again find the dignity to stand upright. We all live at the mercy of biological chance, and although I am not one to take refuge in clichés, I repeat my very servile apologies to any and all who back-packed their way to Peru. Alas, the dark shadow made the same journey.
Each year of life brings us nearer to our decline, but I will continue to seek a listener until I'm dead in a ditch.

with all the soul of the world
MORRISSEY
12 July 2013, Los Angeles.
 

Peppermint

Well-Known Member
It may be that the Guardian got it wrong. Below is Morrissey's own message posted on True to you which mentions that he has returned to LA. It is probably Boz who returned to the UK shortly after the incident, as he always does.

See the luck I've had - true-to-you.net
12 July 2013
I can't give words to the sorrow I feel at the loss of perfect Peru. Oh, black cloud. After such a victorious and uplifting welcome of Lima love, the contaminated jinx had its way via a simple restaurant meal of penne pasta and tomato. Three hours later, both I, and security Liam have collapsed with a deadly and delirious bedridden disease. Five days of round-the-clock medical supervision just barely controls the corrosively toxic food poisoning. I know my luck too well. Sorrow replaces joy, and in every dream home a heartache. It could only be me.
I have returned to Los Angeles and to the expert supervision of my doctor Jeremy Fine, who assures me that I shall be fine (although not in the gossamer, powdery sense) for our upcoming shows in Argentina and Brazil. I have absolutely no idea where my beloved Chile has gone. In the heat of cancellations and postponements, the humiliation and mortification I feel on a personal level is too mammoth to be measured. If my spirits climb down any lower I could never again find the dignity to stand upright. We all live at the mercy of biological chance, and although I am not one to take refuge in clichés, I repeat my very servile apologies to any and all who back-packed their way to Peru. Alas, the dark shadow made the same journey.
Each year of life brings us nearer to our decline, but I will continue to seek a listener until I'm dead in a ditch.

with all the soul of the world
MORRISSEY
12 July 2013, Los Angeles.
Yes, that is a possible explanation. Then again, Morrissey has a long track record of lying/exaggerating - both to obfuscate and to crank up the drama. According to this version he was back home by 12th, and well enough to be posting witty messages to TTY. And seems to have already consulted his doctor. So it's fairly unlikely he'd just flown in that day. Let's be generous and say he flew home on 11th. We don't know for sure but it seems a stretch that he could have been so ill that he was clinically dead, in another country, just three days earlier.
 
Last edited:

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><>
Yes, suicide is morally wrong when you have people around you that you are supposed to take care of. It's a matter of personal responsibility, and you have to assume it despite any suffering. If you don't want to live for yourself you must live for others who depend on you. That's why when governments destroy family relationships and social ties by disproportionately increasing the size and functions of the state they are creating an epidemic of suicides in two ways. First, they are ruining people's economy with high taxes and socialism, and second they are depriving people of their purpose in life, which historically has been to take care of their family and their tribe in a direct way and not through the state in every situation of life. Oversized states treat all people like children. They are not the big brother, they are the big daddy, who takes things from and gives things to people accordingly to its own will and interests. Smart, independent and mature people are being transformed in suffering puppets with limited choices in life. One of those few choices -the wrong path, as I see it- is suicide. That's why I said, summarizing, that suicide is a sin. That's why I think if we are catholics we can't be socialists. Our only big father is in heaven, not seated in the chair of a president, prime minister or king, overwhelmingly deciding about all aspects of human life. Axe the monarchy et al, by the way.
Jesus died for somebody’s sins



but not mine.


:cool:
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><>
Lou was a bit of a speed freak... all that adrenaline, surely he spent
weeks awake all his nights looking into that big white light.




LIFE IS ONE LONG SUICIDE.

:cool:





Suicide is a sin? The ones who have taken their own lives have suffered enough. How about letting up on the judgement and let them have their rest in peace they deserve.

In other news near death experiences are a surge of adrenalin coupled with the undying willingness for the human brain to fool itself even beyond the hospital bed as it seems. There is no next step. This is the only step there is. Get in line and enjoy.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
Yes, that is a possible explanation. Then again, Morrissey has a long track record of lying/exaggerating - both to obfuscate and to crank up the drama. According to this version he was back home by 12th, and well enough to be posting witty messages to TTY. And seems to have already consulted his doctor. So it's fairly unlikely he'd just flown in that day. Let's be generous and say he flew home on 11th. We don't know for sure but it seems a stretch that he could have been so ill that he was clinically dead, in another country, just three days earlier.
Yes, I agree with you that Morrissey has a penchant for dramatisation and hyperboles, and I don't take the things he says too literally. But I think there's some truth to this particular story. I know from a friend that often works as a travel guide that whenever a person is hospitalized abroad and can't continue his ravel, he / she will be flown home as soon as medical conditions permit for further medical treatment and follow-up at home. I think insurance companies require that. So it does not mean that he had already fully recovered from his "clinically dead state in the 2 or 3 days which elapsed between the incident and his repatriation to LA.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
This article explains the timing. It is dated Thursday 11th July. It says the tour was due to begin on Tuesday 9th, and he flew home the day before it was due to begin (Monday 8th); the concert promoter quoted said that the 'poisoning' happened when they went out for dinner on the Sunday. So, if this is correct, yes, the next day.
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/jul/11/morrissey-cancels-south-american-tour-food-poisoning
Thanks for that. It would take a bit of figuring out alright as to how he would even be fit to be wheeled onto a plane with medical staff in attendance 1day after severe food poisoning.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Yes, that is a possible explanation. Then again, Morrissey has a long track record of lying/exaggerating - both to obfuscate and to crank up the drama. According to this version he was back home by 12th, and well enough to be posting witty messages to TTY. And seems to have already consulted his doctor. So it's fairly unlikely he'd just flown in that day. Let's be generous and say he flew home on 11th. We don't know for sure but it seems a stretch that he could have been so ill that he was clinically dead, in another country, just three days earlier.
That version seems more plausible than the one day scenario. A friend of mine who almost died in her 20s from deep vein thrombosis due to a long haul flight, internal flights and climbing Macchu Picchu was flown home to Ireland ASAP with medical staff onboard within two days of being on deaths door It did come down to her insurance company and her dad who was a doctor insisting it happen. Morrissey would certainly have the resources to fly home privately with medical staff attending.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Yes, suicide is morally wrong when you have people around you that you are supposed to take care of. It's a matter of personal responsibility, and you have to assume it despite any suffering. If you don't want to live for yourself you must live for others who depend on you. That's why when governments destroy family relationships and social ties by disproportionately increasing the size and functions of the state they are creating an epidemic of suicides in two ways. First, they are ruining people's economy with high taxes and socialism, and second they are depriving people of their purpose in life, which historically has been to take care of their family and their tribe in a direct way and not through the state in every situation of life. Oversized states treat all people like children. They are not the big brother, they are the big daddy, who takes things from and gives things to people accordingly to its own will and interests. Smart, independent and mature people are being transformed in suffering puppets with limited choices in life. One of those few choices -the wrong path, as I see it- is suicide. That's why I said, summarizing, that suicide is a sin. That's why I think if we are catholics we can't be socialists. Our only big father is in heaven, not seated in the chair of a president, prime minister or king, overwhelmingly deciding about all aspects of human life. Axe the monarchy et al, by the way.
The Catholic Church also brought us limbo which was a permanent state of no mans land for babies who had not been baptised before they died. They were suspended between heaven and hell apparently.
What kind of a mind thought that one up to tell grieving parent's.
The same kind of mind that tells us opting out of a 3D reality to put an end to suffering is a Sin.
None of the world's religions have a clue as to what happens after death, or what the source of it all is like.
That doesn't stop any of them presenting "God the Father" in one form or another to take people's money and make themselves the hierarchy of power.
People commit suicide because they are not in their right minds, not because they are "sinners" according to someone else's made up rule book.
They're not thinking of their moral duties to family and friends.
They're in such a state of emotional pain that they don't think they will ever be happy again.
Labelling their actions a so called sin places more suffering on those they leave behind . I'm very lucky in that way as I don't have an ounce of religious conviction left in me.
I think that suicide is a tragedy and that very often the people who choose to leave this way do it because their judgement is clouded by pain and desolation we can't even imagine.
 

countthree

Obvious person
The Catholic Church also brought us limbo which was a permanent state of no mans land for babies who had not been baptised before they died. They were suspended between heaven and hell apparently.
What kind of a mind thought that one up to tell grieving parent's.
The same kind of mind that tells us opting out of a 3D reality to put an end to suffering is a Sin.
None of the world's religions have a clue as to what happens after death, or what the source of it all is like.
That doesn't stop any of them presenting "God the Father" in one form or another to take people's money and make themselves the hierarchy of power.
People commit suicide because they are not in their right minds, not because they are "sinners" according to someone else's made up rule book.
They're not thinking of their moral duties to family and friends.
They're in such a state of emotional pain that they don't think they will ever be happy again.
Labelling their actions a so called sin places more suffering on those they leave behind . I'm very lucky in that way as I don't have an ounce of religious conviction left in me.
I think that suicide is a tragedy and that very often the people who choose to leave this way do it because their judgement is clouded by pain and desolation we can't even imagine.
I agree that sometimes pain is huge, but we are not supposed to be here to be happy all the time, because that is not what happens most of the time to most people. Just the opposite. Happiness is just an event in some people's lives. Pain, sacrifice and discomfort are the rule. The quicker we learn it the better. I know it's not fair, but life isn't fair at all. It just happens. Life is a series of horrible events we must learn to handle to be able to enjoy the little tiny moments of hapiness that sometimes reach us.

I may seem rude to you, but I will never justify or excuse suicide. Although I respect people's choices. Even the bad ones.
 
P

Pablo Honey

Guest
Yes, suicide is morally wrong when you have people around you that you are supposed to take care of. It's a matter of personal responsibility, and you have to assume it despite any suffering. If you don't want to live for yourself you must live for others who depend on you. That's why when governments destroy family relationships and social ties by disproportionately increasing the size and functions of the state they are creating an epidemic of suicides in two ways. First, they are ruining people's economy with high taxes and socialism, and second they are depriving people of their purpose in life, which historically has been to take care of their family and their tribe in a direct way and not through the state in every situation of life. Oversized states treat all people like children. They are not the big brother, they are the big daddy, who takes things from and gives things to people accordingly to its own will and interests. Smart, independent and mature people are being transformed in suffering puppets with limited choices in life. One of those few choices -the wrong path, as I see it- is suicide. That's why I said, summarizing, that suicide is a sin. That's why I think if we are catholics we can't be socialists. Our only big father is in heaven, not seated in the chair of a president, prime minister or king, overwhelmingly deciding about all aspects of human life. Axe the monarchy et al, by the way.
Here is a food for thought:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/minority-report/201406/asian-honor-and-suicide
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><>
He just died by the sin of the killers. Well, if he actually was killed. He was crucified, we are sure about it. The rest... Who knows.
Wasn’t Jesus’s acceptance of his own crucifixtion a suicide ?

Will his dad ever forgive him ?

Don’t think I can.

:cool:
 

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