"These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage" - brief Morrissey interview - El Comercio

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Famous when dead, Nov 23, 2018.

By Famous when dead on Nov 23, 2018 at 10:38 PM
  1. Famous when dead

    Famous when dead Vulgarian

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    A publication he's spoken to before.
    Via translate - so take with a pinch of salt:

    Morrissey: "Son días de indignación moral salvajemente superficial" -
    El Comercio Perú

    By José Tsang, Nov. 23, 2018.

    5bf80d387753f.jpeg


    Morrissey:
    "These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage"

    Before his concert in Peru, the former The Smiths answers a questionnaire to refer to "El cóndor pasa", Venezuela, his intoxication in Lima and other issues.

    The healthy exercise of thinking differently seems devalued. In music, an illustrious member of that minority club is called Morrissey . The media usually highlight their statements and the 59-year-old British artist defends himself with his songs. His latest album, "Low in High School" (2017), includes a song like "Spent the Day in Bed", which states: "Stop watching the news / Because the news manages to scare you / To make you feel small and alone / To make you feel that your mind is not yours. "

    The contribution to the music of Morrissey is unquestionable: the band The Smiths is one of the best acts of the 80s, and his solo career also generates admiration. On the other hand, his opinions produce resistance, either because of his militant veganism or to criticize current feminism because he believes that he does not aspire to reach a higher intellectual level.


    Morrissey - confessed by a scathing writer like Oscar Wilde - will offer a new concert in Peru this Tuesday, November 27. Before the evening, the singer and composer answered in writing a questionnaire from El Comercio. Among the issues addressed, the figure of intoxication in Lima in 2013.

    -The Pretenders played in Lima a few months ago. At the concert, his singer Chrissie Hynde said that you are one of his favorite composers. What inspires you? And what does "Back on the Chain Gang" - you just make a cover of this song by The Pretenders - for you?

    Chrissie and I have been friends for years. She is an impressive composer who can bring an unusual feeling to her songs, while most writers copy what has been successful. She is determined and does not have that paranoia to do or say what others believe is right.

    -The world of music has changed. The physical disk is disappearing. How not to lose faith in these times? Is it a lost battle? Can we be optimists?

    People will always find music and will need it, but at the same time I think they are all exhausted by the promotional machinery that drives the same faces with the same content. There is no more that thing called natural success. Every move is made. We constantly look at what number 1 is and we do not believe in it even for a second. We are tired of hearing about artists who sell millions, although we know that such artists do not inspire love for music.

    -In this final phase of 2018, what is Oscar Wilde's phrase that comes to mind the most?

    What we fear is what happens to us.

    -Let's talk about your last album "Low in High School". What musical spirit did you look for in it?

    I'm interested in making songs that start conversations, which is easy in these days of savagely superficial moral outrage that everyone seems to want to express. If you offer a song to people, you should raise their lives for at least four minutes; otherwise, it does not make sense. The greatest honor I receive is when they tell me: "Nobody could have written that song, except you".

    -A song like "Who Will Protect Us From The Police?" (Who will protect us from the police?) Is dedicated to Venezuela. What is your point of view about your situation?

    Last year I often saw television images in which the Venezuelan police attacked people, which was because they were tired - as you know - of economic corruption. I wondered what gives the police the right to attack people, which rather pays the police for their protection. It seems to me that whenever the people have had enough of the dishonest governments, the police begin to attack the citizens, but they do not attack the dishonest government. How is this fair or civilized? Governments do not pay the police. People do it.

    -In your last concert in Lima, in 2015, you sang "El cóndor pasa". Why did you choose this song?

    I feel that it has a great moral virtue for the people of Peru; It's like a hand on the shoulder. We all want freedom, we do not want to be the snail or the nail [the phrase in English presents a play on words: "We do not want to be the snail or the nail"], and we imagine that the birds that pass have the final freedom . The song is obviously very old, but it still means a lot because every day we see and hear people who cry out for freedom. Why is it so difficult to get it?

    - Fortunately, the episode of poisoning in Peru, in 2013, was overcome. You said you were "officially dead for nine minutes". What did you see in those nine minutes?

    When you survive a terrible disease, you recover your health but you realize the unbearable meddling of society in your life, your money, your body and your thoughts, just as you see that we have almost no right to relax and be ourselves. People do not seem to realize that just a sneeze separates us from death. We are willing to live as slaves in one way or another, persistently doing what has been said by people we do not respect. We are all slaves in many ways.

    -What can we expect from your new concert in Lima?

    I say what I believe and I say it well. Music brings us closer to other people who share our beliefs. If they come to the concert without expecting anything, they will be disappointed.


    Regards,
    FWD.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 24, 2018
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Comments

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Famous when dead, Nov 23, 2018.

    1. Ketamine Sun
      Ketamine Sun
      'When you survive a terrible disease, you recover your health but you realize the unbearable meddling of society in your life, your money, your body and your thoughts, just as you see that we have almost no right to relax and be ourselves. People do not seem to realize that just a sneeze separates us from death. We are willing to live as slaves in one way or another, persistently doing what has been said by people we do not respect. We are all slaves in many ways.'

      :thumb:



      'Beware the savage jaw
      Of 1984'

      .
      Last edited: Nov 23, 2018
      • Like Like x 2
    2. Mayfly
      Mayfly
      Some nice bits here. The Oscar Wilde quote "What we fear is what happens to us" is a good one and so true.
      And talking about creating songs that inspire a love for music, well this is what the Smiths did for me and it was the greatest gift ever given. For that, I am very, very grateful.
      • Like Like x 3
    3. spineless
      spineless
      Morrissey overestimates the importance of music. Music is a throwaway affair. A mere distraction. Music is whim and fickledom. It's soothing, to a degree, but that's about all. The older I get, the less music means to me. Of course, I'll have a tune at my funeral, but music all the time? There's more to life than a nice tune. Of all the arts, music is the one I could most easily forgo. Even the most majestic of key changes fade on repeated listening.
      Last edited: Nov 24, 2018
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    4. Mayfly
      Mayfly
      But where would Morrissey have been without his deep love for music that gave him the urge to sing and write songs (words and vocal melodies)? Certainly not in a 5* hotel:). Of course, the experience is very personal, almost spiritual to some people.

      I must admit that I also find it harder to get really excited about contemporary artists, still enjoying some new music and concerts though but more as a form of distraction as you describe.
    5. AztecCamera
      AztecCamera
      I reckon people in Mexico still think the California Son is "Brittish" inn nnnn din't inn nn nnn n n it. I me no reckon how Uncle Steve can get sick from any food considering he can devour a pound of refried beans, 5 potato tacos with extra guac, 3 habanero peppers, and a root beer in 10 minutes at Los Panchos in East LA. Can't you fucking dumb asses realize he just wanted to go back home to Moz Angeles and he made up the story about "food poisoning". He will probably do the same thing again.
    6. Ketamine Sun
      Ketamine Sun
      really ? wow.
      • Like Like x 2
    7. Anonymous
      Anonymous

      "These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage"

      Love that. Hope he did say it.
    8. spineless
      spineless
      Haha. Perhaps there's a touch of jealousy in the fact that I don't feel that spiritual experience that other people feel from listening to music. Is it something lacking in me? I try to engage, but find it unbearable to have to sit still and listen to music for any length of time. I fear all the chord progressions and key changes I'm going to hear, have already been heard. I also have a problem with noise, in general, and once you start talking about big bands and full blown orchestras, I find the experience quite alienating.
      • Interesting Interesting x 1
    9. evennow
      evennow
      I'm not sure about your first two sentences. As Morrissey said, "People will always find music and will need it." He is right about this. I know I did when I was younger.

      For me, music is easily marked in time. BS and AS that being before The Smiths and after. I always had a great love of music from when my dad would play Frankie Valli and Four Tops records in my childhood living room on our turntable. I am sure most of us here have some musical memories that we hold fondly in our hearts, and for more than just the music itself.

      But like you wrote, "Even the most majestic of key changes fade on repeated listening." This for me was true up until I heard The Smiths for the first time. Their music is far beyond simply soothing. It nourished me in so many ways, and still continues to do so.

      You say, "Of all the arts, music is the one I could most easily forgo." Not for me. Songs like Asleep, and I Know It's Over, and I Won't Share You, and so many, many more that I return to so often make it impossible for me to make such a statement.

      Live music especially is the best of all the arts because it combines visual, sonic, intellectual (sometimes) and emotional components all in one performance. I have left concerts feeling so entertained and moved in a way that no movie, or play, or art exhibit ever could.
      Last edited: Nov 24, 2018
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    10. spineless
      spineless
      Haha. BS and AS. Funny. You're clearly still feeling the thrill. Perhaps I need a bit of a break. It doesn't help, when you live in the centre of town. Sometimes I could kill for a bit of peace and quiet!
      • Like Like x 1
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    11. evennow
      evennow
      I get that. I have lived in a few major cities with a lot of street noise, and evennow ;) I live off of a main street that is constantly traveled so that keeping my windows open at night is a bit of a challenge.

      I have developed a way to turn the sound of car tires into the flow of a rushing stream. Making lemonade out of lemons is sometimes easier and leaves less blood on your hands than killing for peace and quiet. :)

      EDIT: However...the idea of killing for peace is one that has been played out for centuries so there must be something to it. When you find out let me know.
      Last edited: Nov 24, 2018
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    12. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Thanks to evennow and Spineless for reminding me that Solo can still be a place where rational, articulate souls can engage in an interesting (dare I say touching?) conversation about Morrissey and music. It makes a welcome change.

      I hope you both find a few moments peace over the weekend.
      • Like Like x 4
    13. E Scott
      E Scott
      "Died for 9 minutes" eh????
      • Like Like x 1
    14. Halloway
      Halloway
      Yes, that's about as believable as his cancer claim.
      • Like Like x 1
    15. Peppermint
      Peppermint
      It's debatable that it even happened at all, since he was on a plane for London within 24 hours, by all accounts. Not sure about you, but if I had life-threatening food poisoning I don't think I'd be leaving my bathroom, let alone the country.
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    16. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      "These are days of savagely superficial moral outrage"

      Says the man who has so often peddled superficial moral outrage. I can't think of a more superficial moral outrage than the notion of animal rights.

      But, of course, when it came to people and their rights, it's all belaboring the point. Let's not forget that this is coming from a man who blamed a fourteen year old kid for being sexually abused.

      What as sickening form of narcissism.
      • Dislike Dislike x 3
    17. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      You're in the phase of life where you're old, and ready to die.

      Many aspects of life become tedious to people who no longer have a connection the to the culture they have aged within. The abandonment of music is most often found in people who don't play an instrument. A new found appreciation for bigotry soon follows.

      It's sad, but not common. Still, it reeks of surrender. A dying of the light.

      People tend to live way too long.
      • Like Like x 1
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    18. E Scott
      E Scott
      Let's file this in Morrissey tall tales cabinet next to well most things he spouts.
      • Like Like x 1
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    19. countthree
      countthree
      Yes, that or something like "These are days of wildly shallow moral atrocity". Or something like that. Who knows. Well, Morrissey knows actually :D

      Love the idea behind the words, too.:thumb:

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