Theo, who died today? Anne Bancroft?

  • Thread starter The Artist formerly known as "Arse It"
  • Start date
T

Theo van Gogh Martyrs Brigade

Guest
Yup

And you'll get yours, Mrs. Robinson
Foolin' with that young stuff like you do
Boo hoo hoo, woo woo woo
 
T

The Artist formerly known as "Arse It"

Guest
Re: Yup

> And you'll get yours, Mrs. Robinson
> Foolin' with that young stuff like you do
> Boo hoo hoo, woo woo woo

How old was she then? Had she been ill or was it sudden?

Yes, I too have Frank singing that.
 
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Theo van Gogh Martyrs Brigade

Guest
Re: Yup

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,11069-1645640,00.html

June 08, 2005

Here's to you, Ms Bancroft, screen and stage superstar
From James Bone in New York

THE show-business world united in a final “Here’s to you, Mrs Robinson” yesterday on the death of Anne Bancroft, who was immortalised on screen as the middle-aged seductress in The Graduate.

The Oscar-winning actress succumbed to uterine cancer on Monday night at the age of 73 at New York’s Mount Sinai hospital, according to a spokesman for her husband, the comedian and director Mel Brooks.

Bancroft won her Oscar for her performance as Annie Sullivan, the woman who taught the deaf, dumb and blind Helen Keller, in the 1962 film The Miracle Worker.

It was a role that she had originated on stage in the play by William Gibson in 1959, winning her second successive Tony Award.

But it was for her iconic performance as Mrs Robinson, who shatters middle-class American values by seducing her daughter’s boyfriend in the 1967 film The Graduate, that Bancroft will be remembered. Mrs Robinson’s sexual adventure with Dustin Hoffman’s Benjamin Braddock jolted America just as the women’s movement was gaining momentum. Hoffman, in the title role, delivered the famous line when he realised his girlfriend’s mother was coming on to him in a hotel room: “Mrs Robinson, you’re trying to seduce me . . . Aren’t you?” The part was made even more famous by the success of Simon and Garfunkel’s song, And here’s to you, Mrs Robinson, part of the film score.

In 2003 she admitted that nearly everyone was discouraged from taking the role “because it was all about sex with a younger man”. She viewed the character as having unfulfilled dreams, relegated to a conventional life with a conventional husband. She added: “Film critics said I gave a voice to the fear we all have: that we’ll reach a certain point in our lives, look around and realise that all the things we said we’d do and become will never come to be — and that we’re ordinary.”

She spoke of her sadness that none of her other works was appreciated as much: “I’m quite surprised that with all my work, and some of it is very, very good, that nobody talks about The Miracle Worker.

We’re talking about Mrs Robinson.

“I understand the world . . . I’m just a little dismayed that people aren’t beyond it yet.”

Born Anna Maria Louise Italiano in the Bronx in New York, she started acting on television as Anne Marno. Offered a choice of screen names by her Hollywood studio, she picked Bancroft “because it sounded dignified”.

After a string of B-movies, she escaped to Broadway in 1958 and won her first Tony opposite Henry Fonda in Two for the Seesaw.

Other Oscar nominations came for The Pumpkin Eater (1964), The Graduate (1967), The Turning Point (1977) and Agnes of God (1985).

Mel Brooks, who co-starred with Bancroft in To Be Or Not To Be, met her on the set of a television talk show. He found out which restaurant she aimed to dine in, walked in and “accidentally” met her again.

The couple married on August 5, 1964, and had one son Max, a screenwriter, in 1972.

A LIFE IN THE LIMELIGHT

Born Anna Italiano in September 1931 in the Bronx to Italian immigrant parents

Signed by 20th Century Fox in 1952 after acting in television

Won her first Tony award in 1958 opposite Henry Fonda in Two for the Seesaw

Won Best Actress Oscar in 1962 for The Miracle Worker

Married Mel Brooks in 1964

Nominated for an Oscar for The Graduate in 1967

Returned to Broadway in 2002 in Occupant
 
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The Artist formerly known as "Arse It"

Guest
Re: Yup

> How old was she then? Had she been ill or was it sudden?

> Yes, I too have Frank singing that.

We'd like to learn a little bit about you for our files
We'd like to help you learn to help yourself
Look around you all you see are sympathetic eyes
Stroll around the grounds until you feel at home.

The PTA Mrs Robinson
Won't OK the way you do your thing
Ding ding ding....
 
T

The Artist formerly known as "Arse It"

Guest
That is sad. I didn't realise her and Mel Brooks were still married.

> http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,11069-1645640,00.html June 08,
> 2005

> Here's to you, Ms Bancroft, screen and stage superstar
> From James Bone in New York
I would have thought, she was past the age for uterine cancer to be honest.

Just goes to show eh.

Anyway, thanks for that info.

> THE show-business world united in a final “Here’s to you, Mrs Robinson”
> yesterday on the death of Anne Bancroft, who was immortalised on screen as
> the middle-aged seductress in The Graduate.

> The Oscar-winning actress succumbed to uterine cancer on Monday night at
> the age of 73 at New York’s Mount Sinai hospital, according to a spokesman
> for her husband, the comedian and director Mel Brooks.

> Bancroft won her Oscar for her performance as Annie Sullivan, the woman
> who taught the deaf, dumb and blind Helen Keller, in the 1962 film The
> Miracle Worker.

> It was a role that she had originated on stage in the play by William
> Gibson in 1959, winning her second successive Tony Award.

> But it was for her iconic performance as Mrs Robinson, who shatters
> middle-class American values by seducing her daughter’s boyfriend in the
> 1967 film The Graduate, that Bancroft will be remembered. Mrs Robinson’s
> sexual adventure with Dustin Hoffman’s Benjamin Braddock jolted America
> just as the women’s movement was gaining momentum. Hoffman, in the title
> role, delivered the famous line when he realised his girlfriend’s mother
> was coming on to him in a hotel room: “Mrs Robinson, you’re trying to
> seduce me . . . Aren’t you?” The part was made even more famous by the
> success of Simon and Garfunkel’s song, And here’s to you, Mrs Robinson,
> part of the film score.

> In 2003 she admitted that nearly everyone was discouraged from taking the
> role “because it was all about sex with a younger man”. She viewed the
> character as having unfulfilled dreams, relegated to a conventional life
> with a conventional husband. She added: “Film critics said I gave a voice
> to the fear we all have: that we’ll reach a certain point in our lives,
> look around and realise that all the things we said we’d do and become
> will never come to be — and that we’re ordinary.”

> She spoke of her sadness that none of her other works was appreciated as
> much: “I’m quite surprised that with all my work, and some of it is very,
> very good, that nobody talks about The Miracle Worker.

> We’re talking about Mrs Robinson.

> “I understand the world . . . I’m just a little dismayed that people
> aren’t beyond it yet.”

> Born Anna Maria Louise Italiano in the Bronx in New York, she started
> acting on television as Anne Marno. Offered a choice of screen names by
> her Hollywood studio, she picked Bancroft “because it sounded dignified”.

> After a string of B-movies, she escaped to Broadway in 1958 and won her
> first Tony opposite Henry Fonda in Two for the Seesaw.

> Other Oscar nominations came for The Pumpkin Eater (1964), The Graduate
> (1967), The Turning Point (1977) and Agnes of God (1985).

> Mel Brooks, who co-starred with Bancroft in To Be Or Not To Be, met her on
> the set of a television talk show. He found out which restaurant she aimed
> to dine in, walked in and “accidentally” met her again.

> The couple married on August 5, 1964, and had one son Max, a screenwriter,
> in 1972.

> A LIFE IN THE LIMELIGHT

> Born Anna Italiano in September 1931 in the Bronx to Italian immigrant
> parents

> Signed by 20th Century Fox in 1952 after acting in television

> Won her first Tony award in 1958 opposite Henry Fonda in Two for the
> Seesaw

> Won Best Actress Oscar in 1962 for The Miracle Worker

> Married Mel Brooks in 1964

> Nominated for an Oscar for The Graduate in 1967

> Returned to Broadway in 2002 in Occupant
 
L

lg

Guest
Re: That is sad. I didn't realise her and Mel Brooks were still married.

Wonderful actress.
Will be sadly missed.

> I would have thought, she was past the age for uterine cancer to be
> honest.

> Just goes to show eh.

> Anyway, thanks for that info.
 
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