"The story of NME in 70 (mostly) seminal songs" includes Morrissey and The Smiths (March 7, 2022)

Shoplifterromo sends the link:


Excerpt:

24. The Smiths, ‘How Soon Is Now?’ (1984)
Pre-Smiths, Morrissey was a regular correspondent to the NME letters page and sent in copious reviews in the hope of getting published. By the time the dank Doppler rockabilly lament ‘How Soon Is Now?’ emerged on the B-side of ‘William, It Was Really Nothing’, however, the paper hung on his every word. As the totemic act of primordial indie, The Smiths replaced The Jam (RIP) as the definitive NME band and perennial sweepers of Awards boards – they’d be voted Best Group by readers until they split, as reliably as Margaret Thatcher would win Creep Of The Year.

33. Morrissey, ‘Suedehead’ (1988)
What is this, the New Morrissey Express? In the wake of The Smiths’ split it certainly seemed so as, solo, Morrissey became something of an NME obsession, appearing on the cover of the 40th anniversary edition and having entire cover stories devoted to his annotated touring Polaroids. “It became like a fan magazine,” writer Andrew Collins told Pat Long, but all that was to change in 1992, when NME criticised Morrissey’s appearance at Madstock wrapped in a Union flag and singing ‘National Front Disco’. He wouldn’t speak to the paper for the next 12 years.
 

Ms NOW I Understand

Don't explain your philosophy, embody it
Thanks!!! @Ketamine Sun~ I appreciate your rational, even-keeled answers. Sometimes I get ravenously focused on wanting the truth of things...
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
One of the worst aspects of that NME stitch-up was that towards the end of 1992, less than six months later, the NME ran on its front page a huge picture of Carter USM posing while waving an EU flag. I wrote to the NME to throw their own quote about Morrissey back at them ("does he really know what flag-waving means in the late 20th century?") and accuse them of hypocrisy. They didn't print my letter and didn't send any reply.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'll never understand how wrapping yourself in the flag of your own country is racist.
Like it or not, the fact is that after it was co-opted by the NF and various other racist factions in the 1970s, displaying the Union flag had become a very distasteful thing to do. Even by the early 1990s, parading 'proudly' with the flag (other than in some kind of official pagentry-type capacity) was something only racists did. Morrissey, having been woefully out of touch with the real world since the minute he found fame, presumably didn't realise this. But it was true, and he got badly burned for it.

Yes, fast forward five years and you have Geri's dress, Noel's guitar etc etc. But by then Britain was at the height of what was embarrissingly termed Cool Britannia and Britain was once again culturally the centre of the universe. Appearing onstage with the Union flag at the Brit awards or a stadium concert was the perfect way to finally reclaim it from the far-Right, and (thanks Britpoppers!) it worked. So yes, it's hard to imagine - since then we've had famous images of people like Mo Farah and Lewis Hamilton proudly wrapping themselves in the flag - but for about 20-odd years it WAS a racist thing to do in Britain, because it had become the preserve of the far-Right.

Geri and Noel picked the perfect time to reclaim it from the racists. Morrissey didn't (if that was even his intention in the first place).
 
D

Deleted member 29417

Guest
Like it or not, the fact is that after it was co-opted by the NF and various other racist factions in the 1970s, displaying the Union flag had become a very distasteful thing to do. Even by the early 1990s, parading 'proudly' with the flag (other than in some kind of official pagentry-type capacity) was something only racists did. Morrissey, having been woefully out of touch with the real world since the minute he found fame, presumably didn't realise this. But it was true, and he got badly burned for it.

Yes, fast forward five years and you have Geri's dress, Noel's guitar etc etc. But by then Britain was at the height of what was embarrissingly termed Cool Britannia and Britain was once again culturally the centre of the universe. Appearing onstage with the Union flag at the Brit awards or a stadium concert was the perfect way to finally reclaim it from the far-Right, and (thanks Britpoppers!) it worked. So yes, it's hard to imagine - since then we've had famous images of people like Mo Farah and Lewis Hamilton proudly wrapping themselves in the flag - but for about 20-odd years it WAS a racist thing to do in Britain, because it had become the preserve of the far-Right.

Geri and Noel picked the perfect time to reclaim it from the racists. Morrissey didn't (if that was even his intention in the first place).

You're mistaken.

The Union Jack was never the preserve of "the far right".

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A

Anonymous

Guest
You're lying.

The Union Jack was never the preserve of "the far right".

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Hmm. Well, the first comes under 'official pagentry-type capacity', in pic three they are wearing it, not parading it, and Freddie Mercury is onstage with a band called Queen, so hardly likely to be a misconstrued gesture.

Which leaves the Stones. Proudly showing off the Union flag alongside the flag of Cuba and the Confederate flag. Not sure what message they were trying to give but it's not a good look.
 
D

Deleted member 29417

Guest
Hmm. Well, the first comes under 'official pagentry-type capacity', in pic three they are wearing it, not parading it, and Freddie Mercury is onstage with a band called Queen, so hardly likely to be a misconstrued gesture.

Which leaves the Stones. Proudly showing off the Union flag alongside the flag of Cuba and the Confederate flag. Not sure what message they were trying to give but it's not a good look.

It's not a far right symbol if it can be used in official pageantry, worn as clothing or used in a way that can't be "misconstrued".


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Ketamine Sun

Now, today, tomorrow and always
Hmm. Well, the first comes under 'official pagentry-type capacity', in pic three they are wearing it, not parading it, and Freddie Mercury is onstage with a band called Queen, so hardly likely to be a misconstrued gesture.

But Morrissey was on stage with his band also. So how was it a misconstrued gesture for him but not for Freddie?

Which leaves the Stones. Proudly showing off the Union flag alongside the flag of Cuba and the Confederate flag. Not sure what message they were trying to give but it's not a good look.
 
V

vegan cro spirit .888

Guest
Like it or not, the fact is that after it was co-opted by the NF and various other racist factions in the 1970s, displaying the Union flag had become a very distasteful thing to do. Even by the early 1990s, parading 'proudly' with the flag (other than in some kind of official pagentry-type capacity) was something only racists did. Morrissey, having been woefully out of touch with the real world since the minute he found fame, presumably didn't realise this. But it was true, and he got badly burned for it.

Yes, fast forward five years and you have Geri's dress, Noel's guitar etc etc. But by then Britain was at the height of what was embarrissingly termed Cool Britannia and Britain was once again culturally the centre of the universe. Appearing onstage with the Union flag at the Brit awards or a stadium concert was the perfect way to finally reclaim it from the far-Right, and (thanks Britpoppers!) it worked. So yes, it's hard to imagine - since then we've had famous images of people like Mo Farah and Lewis Hamilton proudly wrapping themselves in the flag - but for about 20-odd years it WAS a racist thing to do in Britain, because it had become the preserve of the far-Right.

Geri and Noel picked the perfect time to reclaim it from the racists. Morrissey didn't (if that was even his intention in the first place).
:rolleyes:

are you daft? too much time on the dole?🥸
the flag was racist for a few years?:crazy:
and then was reclaimed by the 'britppopers"?


:lbf:

:hammer:
 
J

Js138

Guest
Like it or not, the fact is that after it was co-opted by the NF and various other racist factions in the 1970s, displaying the Union flag had become a very distasteful thing to do. Even by the early 1990s, parading 'proudly' with the flag (other than in some kind of official pagentry-type capacity) was something only racists did. Morrissey, having been woefully out of touch with the real world since the minute he found fame, presumably didn't realise this. But it was true, and he got badly burned for it.

Yes, fast forward five years and you have Geri's dress, Noel's guitar etc etc. But by then Britain was at the height of what was embarrissingly termed Cool Britannia and Britain was once again culturally the centre of the universe. Appearing onstage with the Union flag at the Brit awards or a stadium concert was the perfect way to finally reclaim it from the far-Right, and (thanks Britpoppers!) it worked. So yes, it's hard to imagine - since then we've had famous images of people like Mo Farah and Lewis Hamilton proudly wrapping themselves in the flag - but for about 20-odd years it WAS a racist thing to do in Britain, because it had become the preserve of the far-Right.

Geri and Noel picked the perfect time to reclaim it from the racists. Morrissey didn't (if that was even his intention in the first place).
Someone threw a flag on stage, he twirled it around while singing a song with the lyrics “we won’t vote conservative”. This is a nothingburger hit piece and you’re out here trying to give it validity.
 
K

Ketchup

Guest
Someone threw a flag on stage, he twirled it around while singing a song with the lyrics “we won’t vote conservative”. This is a nothingburger hit piece and you’re out here trying to give it validity.
It was someone from the NME who tossed the flag on stage, apparently. All part of the set-up.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
It was someone from the NME who tossed the flag on stage, apparently. All part of the set-up.

Was the giant picture of the skinheads part of the set-up too? That plays a big part in it as well. It's the combination of the visuals.
 

Redacted

I think I must be, absolutely, a total sex object.
Was the giant picture of the skinheads part of the set-up too? That plays a big part in it as well. It's the combination of the visuals.
You really are a delicate flower
 
D

Deleted member 29417

Guest
Was the giant picture of the skinheads part of the set-up too? That plays a big part in it as well. It's the combination of the visuals.

The giant picture was of two girls (Caroline & Debbie) & ridiculously within the hit piece the NME has the photographer worrying about the girls being demeaned - even though the NME are also claiming the girls are racist imagery.

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Anonymous

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The giant picture was of two girls (Caroline & Debbie) & ridiculously within the hit piece the NME has the photographer worrying about the girls being demeaned - even though the NME are also claiming the girls are racist imagery.

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Skinheads, Doc Martens (Klaus Martens was a doctor in the German army during WW II), Fred Perry, braces, the look of love hate.

Symbolistic clothing is a thing. Of course it is. Just as face fur is. If you walked around with Adolf's tash, you'd get some looks. Morrissey has embraced that Dr Martens, skinhead look. Unless you haven't seen his videos. Which you have. Now you'll say, 'But Morrissey has embraced black culture'. Of course he has. Except he hasn't really. He's had a few backdrops at gigs so you can say that. Or is that the reason? Are there any black people in Morrissey's videos? Off the top of my head, I can't remember. Has Morrissey used any black directors? Producers? Musicians? Support acts? I have no idea.

Someone will dig into this one day.
 
D

Deleted member 29417

Guest
Skinheads, Doc Martens (Klaus Martens was a doctor in the German army during WW II), Fred Perry, braces, the look of love hate.

Symbolistic clothing is a thing. Of course it is. Just as face fur is. If you walked around with Adolf's tash, you'd get some looks. Morrissey has embraced that Dr Martens, skinhead look. Unless you haven't seen his videos. Which you have. Now you'll say, 'But Morrissey has embraced black culture'. Of course he has. Except he hasn't really. He's had a few backdrops at gigs so you can say that. Or is that the reason? Are there any black people in Morrissey's videos? Off the top of my head, I can't remember. Has Morrissey used any black directors? Producers? Musicians? Support acts? I have no idea.

Someone will dig into this one day.

The National Front/BNP hated gay people & Irish Catholics.

They were in London ON THAT DAY to attack an Irish Republican march.

The 'Our Frank' video, featuring skinheads, was directed by John Maybury - who is gay.

Morrissey was attacked by the crowd who, according to Select Magazine, called him a 'poofy bastard'.

So you're basically arguing that an Irish Catholic 'poofy bastard' holding a Union Jack in front of a picture of two girls on a day the National Front was attacking Irish Catholics and he himself was attacked by skinheads who perceived him as gay - is racism.
 

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