The Smiths (canceled) show at "City Gardens" New Jersey?

darby1974

Member
I am reading the book "No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes. An oral history of the legendary City Gardens" by Amy Yates Wuelfing and it has a part that says The Smiths were booked on January 6th 1984 but was canceled due to Mike Joyce having "the flu or mumps of something" says (Randy Now) who was the City Gardens booking agent. Am I missing something? I am guessing this was when they were in the US for the 01/01/1984 Danceteria and were going to play City Gardens as well, but I can't find the information in Goddards book or Passions. Am I missing something? In the book, Randy Now says when Mike Joyce was playing in The Buzzcocks, he told Mike, "The Smiths were supposed to play here but the drummer got sick" and Mike says, "yeah, that was me, I had chicken pox"

Is this not listed or did I just miss it?
 

Famous when dead

Vulgarian
Moderator
There is a tiny bit on PJLM, but Moz clarifies (all culled from Autobiography):

"We had made our American debut at the Danceteria in New York, and had planned to continue to Boston and New Jersey. We were booked into New York’s famous Algonquin hotel – so beloved of James Dean in the 1950s and a place of rest for Oscar Wilde many Decembers ago."

"The following day we are set to move on to New Jersey (although, offhand, I have no idea why). Geoff tells me that he will not be coming the rest of the way with us – as if this might make any difference. His investment secured by the signatures on the contract, Geoff is not quite interested enough to endure a second American gig. I am then led across the hallway to where Mike has his room, and there he sits upright in bed – a mass of large red sores covering his face and upper body. It is explained to me that Mike had shared his bed last night and that the unlucky dalliance left him with an outbreak of Lebanese warts. This now means that our trips to New Jersey and Boston must be scrapped, yet we cannot leave the country until the infected body is able to travel. I pass several more days in New York by myself. Johnny is nowhere to be seen, and I do not lay eyes on him once during my entire stay at the Algonquin. I am baffled, or mentally deficient, or both, but certainly I am deliberately cut off from everyone, as a prearranged plot kicks into full gear. I am being frozen out. It is a difficult week of rigid iceberg weather, as I dig despairingly at the Strand Bookshop and cough my way through the cheap eateries of Times Square slime, and I now fully realize that the other three Smiths are taking great steps to oust me. Why, I do not know. New York has not yet been daubed with New World flash and brightness – no sign, as yet, of the computer age, and here in the wrong section of Fifth Avenue it is still a quagmire of midnight cowboys and sterile cuckoos. Perhaps it is the best of times for New York City. I am never troubled or approached as I sit alone in Washington Square. Smells abound unique to this city, and a warring settlement moves too fast, and the lonely traveler is engulfed. When we all finally meet at the airport there is enough silence to indicate the end."

Regards,
FWD.
 

kissmyshadestoo

Nobody ever looks at me twice
"The following day we are set to move on to New Jersey (although, offhand, I have no idea why). Geoff tells me that he will not be coming the rest of the way with us – as if this might make any difference. His investment secured by the signatures on the contract, Geoff is not quite interested enough to endure a second American gig. I am then led across the hallway to where Mike has his room, and there he sits upright in bed – a mass of large red sores covering his face and upper body. It is explained to me that Mike had shared his bed last night and that the unlucky dalliance left him with an outbreak of Lebanese warts. This now means that our trips to New Jersey and Boston must be scrapped, yet we cannot leave the country until the infected body is able to travel. I pass several more days in New York by myself. Johnny is nowhere to be seen, and I do not lay eyes on him once during my entire stay at the Algonquin. I am baffled, or mentally deficient, or both, but certainly I am deliberately cut off from everyone, as a prearranged plot kicks into full gear. I am being frozen out. It is a difficult week of rigid iceberg weather, as I dig despairingly at the Strand Bookshop and cough my way through the cheap eateries of Times Square slime, and I now fully realize that the other three Smiths are taking great steps to oust me. Why, I do not know. New York has not yet been daubed with New World flash and brightness – no sign, as yet, of the computer age, and here in the wrong section of Fifth Avenue it is still a quagmire of midnight cowboys and sterile cuckoos. Perhaps it is the best of times for New York City. I am never troubled or approached as I sit alone in Washington Square. Smells abound unique to this city, and a warring settlement moves too fast, and the lonely traveler is engulfed. When we all finally meet at the airport there is enough silence to indicate the end."
:crazy::crazy:
 

Quando quando quando

Well-Known Member

I understand the crazy smileys and I guess a lot of people feel the same.
But it is one of the many interesting things Moz says.
It is very revealing and honest.
Up until that moment in time he was merely seen as depressive, melancholic, funny, witty, literary influenced pop/rock star and the spokesman of The Smiths and of a beginning fansstruck following.
He was seen as the leader which he was.

The idea that in that time Moz was also very vulnerable as an artist and as a person and thought there could be a conspiracy to get rid of him shows his uncertainty and the paranoia.
He was the guy everybody looked up to but he didn't really believe in his own charisma.

There is a strong contradiction here in how people looked up to him and how he really felt.
I think it is brave and honest to tell this story and it makes him more believeable and stronger as an artist and a person then so many others who are always protecting their image, hiding behind it.
Cheers kissmyshadestoo. :thumb:
 

kissmyshadestoo

Nobody ever looks at me twice
Crazy to think they would've played not too far from where I lived.....I just wasn't into them at the time though. I know a few bands from high school who played there. I was too young and missed some great shows.....The Ramones played there as well as The Replacements.....
 

darby1974

Member
Crazy to think they would've played not too far from where I lived.....I just wasn't into them at the time though. I know a few bands from high school who played there. I was too young and missed some great shows.....The Ramones played there as well as The Replacements.....
You wouldn't believe the bands that played there. New order played an afternoon gig (all ages) show with 16 people there and a 21 and over that evening with like 60 people there. Ramones, Replacements (like 12 times), Husker Du, Minute Men, Descendants, Dead Kennedy's, Black Flag. Also all the New Wave acts like Flock Of Seagulls and Boo Woo Woo etc... Great Book...
 
Top Bottom