The New Statesman: "Nick Cave: “I don’t think art should be in the hands of the virtuous”" - Morrissey mention (November 24, 2022)


Excerpt:

One of the subjects on which Cave has recently ordered his thoughts is cancel culture, and what he describes as its asphyxiating effect on creative society. “I think the divisive nature of the cultural argument these days is religious in temperament,” he says, “and the worst of religion is puritanical, superior, self-righteous.” I ask him about Morrissey, now considered a pariah for his nationalist sympathies. “The hypocrisy is ridiculous,” he says. “I don’t care what Morrissey’s views on things are, but I do care about his legacy. I think they’re some of the most beautiful songs ever written, and they meant an enormous amount to people when they came out. Those songs saved lives. His songs talked to these lonely, disenfranchised individuals, and certainly they had a voice.

“I think we need to be careful with these sorts of things, when we’re looking around for the bad actors. The music that really inspires me is almost always made by the most terrible characters. Not necessarily cancellable, but just not very nice people. I don’t think art should be in the hands of the virtuous.”
 
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Dirk Blaggard

Well-Known Member
What Nick said is true. I adore him for saying it.
lots of journo's mention M in the hope he will be slagged. They picked the wrong one with Nick. What he said is extremely true. People are so jealous of the power M had (i think he still has it, just not on Rebel without Applause)
 

rifke wire

26% descended from the great teutonic tribes
art, like god, doesnt exist on a moral scale
 

🐈🐈🐈

Well-Known Member
In a nutshell - great music, terrible person.

Bit preachy considering I once saw Nick Cave literally punch a telephone out of a young lad’s hand when he jumped on stage with him.

Something Morrissey would never do because he’s a kind and courteous gentleman.
 

gonzax

Junior Member
Very well said by Nick Cave, I totally agree.

I adore Morrissey. I don't think he's half of the things he's called, anyway, but I couldn't care less about his political views, his or anyone else's, I mean, I have friends whose ideas don't match with mine and they're excellent people, should I stop talking to them just because of that? I don't think so.
 

🐈🐈🐈

Well-Known Member
In addition I remember a story told which someone once told me that makes Nick Cave’s comments even more laughable and rich in hypocrisy. Having views against the media machine is quite a different thing to drunken pestering……
 

NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH #FBPB
Bowie songs sound the same even if he was a paedo
 

goinghome

Hearts securely stacked
This is an absorbing, moving and well-made profile in which Nick Cave's defence of Morrissey contrasts with Fergal Kinney's take-down of him in the same publication last month.
 

BookishBoy

Well-Known Member
[EDIT: oops, my bad, hadn't spotted this was already on Solo!]

Nov 24 2022 New Statesman interview with Nick Cave, mentioning Morrissey

There's a long and (as ever) fascinating interview with Nick Cave in the New Statesman.

Whole article is linked here, but the relevant section about Morrissey is:

On the Red Hand Files, fans question his violent musical past. “These days, some of my songs are feeling a little nervous,” he told one in 2020. “They are like children that have been playing cheerfully in the schoolyard, only to be told that all along they have had some hideous physical deformity… But what songwriter could have predicted thirty years ago that the future would lose its sense of humour, its sense of playfulness, its sense of context, nuance and irony, and fall into the hands of a perpetually pissed-off coterie of pearl-clutchers? How were we to know?”

One of the subjects on which Cave has recently ordered his thoughts is cancel culture, and what he describes as its asphyxiating effect on creative society. “I think the divisive nature of the cultural argument these days is religious in temperament,” he says, “and the worst of religion is puritanical, superior, self-righteous.” I ask him about Morrissey, now considered a pariah for his nationalist sympathies. “The hypocrisy is ridiculous,” he says. “I don’t care what Morrissey’s views on things are, but I do care about his legacy. I think they’re some of the most beautiful songs ever written, and they meant an enormous amount to people when they came out. Those songs saved lives. His songs talked to these lonely, disenfranchised individuals, and certainly they had a voice.

“I think we need to be careful with these sorts of things, when we’re looking around for the bad actors. The music that really inspires me is almost always made by the most terrible characters. Not necessarily cancellable, but just not very nice people. I don’t think art should be in the hands of the virtuous.”
 
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Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.
Nick Cave. One of the most full-blown geniuses ever in rock. A style completely his own, despite gathering a ton from his influences, and at 65, he keeps evolving, keeps challenging himself and his audience and over the past nine years, he’s made his best albums.
 

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