The New European article comparison with nationalism and patriotism

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
Oh no, í cringe at Muriels brogue. Cringe yet simultaneously feel a warm glow. Probably cos it's near-as-dammit my own. The thrill & horror of home. "The Best Gurrril in the Wurrild" Etc ~ love & romance never stood a chance in this neck of the woods.
But í think Moz loves us Jocks, so that's the main thing. As @Nerak knows...

.

I have a soft spot for Scottish accents ever since I fell in love with Ewan McGregor.

But I like a good, distict accent in any language, really. It gives a person's speech more character. There's nothing more boring than a standard accent lacking any kind of individual features.
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
Not all of it. So far I've mostly marvelled at the photographs.

I think he wasn't considered to be a part of it. The Smiths were often cited as an influence on many bands of course but I think he himself was too separated from the "scene" and too much "locked in the past" to be a part of it.

His early fascination with Suede, who were clearly going for a Morrissey/Bowie-hybrid type of aesthetic, quickly went sour, if I recall correctly.

The year Oasis started out with an album full of drug and rock'n'roll references, he released a soft, romantic, nostalgic album and in 1995, at the height of Britpop, he followed up with what must have almost sounded like prog rock to most people.

But honestly, as much as I love the whole era, I've never liked the term "Britpop" much. So it's not necessarily a bad thing that Morrissey didn't fit in.

I wonder if it annoys him that Britpop got to use any amount of flegs & English heritage & even launched Cool Britannia (our global brand - mixing tradition with innovation 🙄) while he got relentlessly attacked for holding a Union Jack at one gig that he wasn't even happy at?

The era was a little questionable...

 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
She just looks like an edgier version of Madonna here.


"They probably feel like I'm somewhat too clever to do what I do."

Uh-huh.

So í watched it {with my eyes closed}...you didn't mention the Astrological Reading!!! That should have been the big sell. Christ, he looked like he was on day release from Wormwood Scrubs. í guess Russell Grant was washing his hair...

.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
I wonder if it annoys him that Britpop got to use any amount of flegs & English heritage & even launched Cool Britannia (our global brand - mixing tradition with innovation 🙄) while he got relentlessly attacked for holding a Union Jack at one gig that he wasn't even happy at?

The era was a little questionable...


It probably did annoy him.
He occasionally voiced some appreciation for certain bands or songs (he was quite fond of the Gallaghers' public personas and really loved Gene and Echobelly).

The ideology was so weird. I never cared much for that, although in hindsight it does make the whole thing more interesting. Musically it was a great era though. Some flawless records.

It's (What's The Story) Morning Glory's 25th anniversary today. Probably one of my most played pop records.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
So í watched it {with my eyes closed}...you didn't mention the Astrological Reading!!! That should have been the big sell. Christ, he looked like he was on day release from Wormwood Scrubs. í guess Russell Grant was washing his hair...

.

I was still watching when I posted that, sorry!!! It had been years...

I thought he looked like he just got up from the couch, where he'd been lounging and snoozing on a rainy Sunday afternoon.
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
It probably did annoy him.
He occasionally voiced some appreciation for certain bands or songs (he was quite fond of the Gallaghers' public personas and really loved Gene and Echobelly).

The ideology was so weird. I never cared much for that, although in hindsight it does make the whole thing more interesting. Musically it was a great era though. Some flawless records.

It's (What's The Story) Morning Glory's 25th anniversary today. Probably one of my most played pop records.

It's the ideology & the branding that I really know about. It looks fun but feels like the Titanic heading towards the iceberg of 9/11, social media, the crash, austerity & the current hellscape.
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
So í watched it {with my eyes closed}...you didn't mention the Astrological Reading!!! That should have been the big sell. Christ, he looked like he was on day release from Wormwood Scrubs. í guess Russell Grant was washing his hair...

.

I didn't pick up that he deliberately highlights causes that don't get national attention & doesn't feel he needs to join in with things that already have a lot of attention.

Which means he gets flack for seeming not to care about things everyone is caring about & for caring about things they're not interested in or are possibly actively hostile to.

Poor wee sod.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
It's the ideology & the branding that I really know about. It looks fun but feels like the Titanic heading towards the iceberg of 9/11, social media, the crash, austerity & the current hellscape.

It's funny, to me the "ideology" almost seems like something that was retroactively attached to a number of bands and artists that were initially very different from each other. They were all British, but they didn't have a collective "agenda". It's almost random who was/is considered to be part of "Britpop" and who isn't.

It seems quite artificial, a marketing strategy, just like the stupid Blur vs. Oasis rivalry.

It's entirely possible that my perspective is quite weird though. I'm mostly interested in the music, the style and the cross-references.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
Not all of it. So far I've mostly marvelled at the photographs.

I think he wasn't considered to be a part of it. The Smiths were often cited as an influence on many bands of course but I think he himself was too separated from the "scene" and too much "locked in the past" to be a part of it.

His early fascination with Suede, who were clearly going for a Morrissey/Bowie-hybrid type of aesthetic, quickly went sour, if I recall correctly.

The year Oasis started out with an album full of drug and rock'n'roll references, he released a soft, romantic, nostalgic album and in 1995, at the height of Britpop, he followed up with what must have almost sounded like prog rock to most people.

But honestly, as much as I love the whole era, I've never liked the term "Britpop" much. So it's not necessarily a bad thing that Morrissey didn't fit in.

Got your point. Reflecting on the term now, it was probably a marketing term used to draw attention on a bunch of exciting new young British bands that were taking their inspiration from the British pop, rock and glam-rock tradition: the Beatles for Oasis, glam-rock for Suede....and Gene was a good copycat of the Smiths and Morrissey. By that time, Morrissey was already an established artist, so he wouldn't qualify. And no, the styles of the albums he released did not exactly chime in with the predominant style of Britpop, typical Moz of course.

But up to 1997 (Maladjusted), Morrissey was the greatest British icon of his time. I couldn't think of him in any other way then.

And whatever we think of the label "Britpop", it really was a fantastic time for British music, with several timeless albums released. Oasis' Morning Glory (25th anniversary today) sold most copies, but my favorites are Pulp (A different class) and the first 3 albums by Suede.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
Got your point. Reflecting on the term now, it was probably a marketing term used to draw attention on a bunch of exciting new young British bands that were taking their inspiration from the British pop, rock and glam-rock tradition: the Beatles for Oasis, glam-rock for Suede....and Gene was a good copycat of the Smiths and Morrissey. By that time, Morrissey was already an established artist, so he wouldn't qualify. And no, the styles of the albums he released did not exactly chime in with the predominant style of Britpop, typical Moz of course.

But up to 1997 (Maladjusted), Morrissey was the greatest British icon of his time. I couldn't think of him in any other way then.

And whatever we think of the label "Britpop", it really was a fantastic time for British music, with several timeless albums released. Oasis' Morning Glory (25th anniversary today) sold most copies, but my favorites are Pulp (A different class) and the first 3 albums by Suede.

Morning Glory takes the crown for me. Still listening to the fantastic deluxe edition right now.

The first three Suede albums are great of course and I love Pulp as well.

But my heart beats for the girls.

Elastica's debut, the first three Echobelly albums, Sleeper's Smart and The It Girl, Catatonia's International Velvet...

Kenickie had some of the most gorgeous singles of the 90s. Come Out 2Nite is pure pop perfection.

The Manics. The Verve. Travis. *

Those are the most important ones for me personally. Some of them probably aren't even considered "Britpop" but it's the same era.


*Blur existed and were pretty good too.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
Morning Glory takes the crown for me. Still listening to the fantastic deluxe edition right now.

The first three Suede albums are great of course and I love Pulp as well.

But my heart beats for the girls.

Elastica's debut, the first three Echobelly albums, Sleeper's Smart and The It Girl, Catatonia's International Velvet...

Kenickie had some of the most gorgeous singles of the 90s. Come Out 2Nite is pure pop perfection.

The Manics. The Verve. Travis. *

Those are the most important ones for me personally. Some of them probably aren't even considered "Britpop" but it's the same era.


*Blur existed and were pretty good too.

KC mentioned the Manics in that audio interview as another great band to photograph. When Richey (the 2nd guitarist) was still around, they really looked great and had such a terrific punk attitude. Their Holy Bible is definitely up there too among my favorites.

I like the girls bands too, but they are somewhat forgotten now, aren't they? It are really the male bands, or solo careers coming out of these bands, which found long lasting success.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
This excerpt is Old Young Moz in Excelsis Deo

From 8:00 ~ 11:15; Gurrrils to bitter...


:flowers:

.

I had so much fun listening to this interview, where has the time gone?
There's an innocence there, and also a clear joy of being there and sharing, all of which I am finding very touching.
So thanks for posting.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
KC mentioned the Manics in that audio interview as another great band to photograph. When Richey (the 2nd guitarist) was still around, they really looked great and had such a terrific punk attitude. Their Holy Bible is definitely up there too among my favorites.

I like the girls bands too, but they are somewhat forgotten now, aren't they? It are really the male bands, or solo careers coming out of these bands, which found long lasting success.

The Manics really were such a visual band. The aesthetics were absolutely a key part of what made them great. KC released a whole book about them:

91+b+JyLeSL.jpg


Iconic shot of Nicky, the Culture Slut, and Richey, with "VIH" scratched in his neck ("HIV" backwards because he was doing it looking in a mirror). Used on their first NME cover.

Manics1_1415893076_resize_460x400.jpg



As for the girls... Yes, they are mostly forgotten, I'm afraid. Which is an absolute shame.

The same goes for The Long Blondes for example, whose Someone To Drive You Home was another perfect record (with several Moz references), which was preceded by a batch of perfect singles and released on Rough Trade in 2006 at the height of the UK Indie revival. People remember the Arctic Monkeys or the Kaiser Chiefs but The Long Blondes seem entirely forgotten.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
The Manics really were such a visual band. The aesthetics were absolutely a key part of what made them great. KC released a whole book about them:

View attachment 59628

Iconic shot of Nicky, the Culture Slut, and Richey, with "VIH" scratched in his neck ("HIV" backwards because he was doing it looking in a mirror). Used on their first NME cover.

View attachment 59630


As for the girls... Yes, they are mostly forgotten, I'm afraid. Which is an absolute shame.

The same goes for The Long Blondes for example, whose Someone To Drive You Home was another perfect record (with several Moz references), which was preceded by a batch of perfect singles and released on Rough Trade in 2006 at the height of the UK Indie revival. People remember the Arctic Monkeys or the Kaiser Chiefs but The Long Blondes seem entirely forgotten.

Wonderful. I think the pictures above date from around their first album and their single "Little baby nothing" which has the culture slut reference in it. Indeed, early Manics were a great antidote to the greyness and dullness of their time, and just like The Smiths, they set out to be more than just a band.

I only very vaguely remember The Long Blondes. Such a pity for the girls, presumably the business wasn't supporting them as much.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
Wonderful. I think the pictures above date from around their first album and their single "Little baby nothing" which has the culture slut reference in it. Indeed, early Manics were a great antidote to the greyness and dullness of their time, and just like The Smiths, they set out to be more than just a band.

I only very vaguely remember The Long Blondes. Such a pity for the girls, presumably the business wasn't supporting them as much.

For the The Longes Blondes it was mostly fate. Main songwriter and guitarist Dorian suffered from a stroke in 2008.

I still follow Kate Jackson's career. She released a solo album with Bernard Butler in 2016 but now she's mostly working as a painter.
 

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
For the The Longes Blondes it was mostly fate. Main songwriter and guitarist Dorian suffered from a stroke in 2008.

I still follow Kate Jackson's career. She released a solo album with Bernard Butler in 2016 but now she's mostly working as a painter.

I absolutely love The Long Blondes, they should have been huge.
"Once and Never Again" sounds like different parts of 3 or 4 Smiths songs all smashed together.

 
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GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Nobody's Nothing
I absolutely love The Long Blondes, they should have been huge.
"Once and Never Again" sounds like different parts of 3 or 4 Smiths songs all smashed together.

"Another drama by the kitchen sink tonight"

Dorian, who wrote most of the lyrics, was obviously VERY inspired by Moz and The Smiths.
Swallow Tattoo and You Could Have Both are quite obvious, but the ambiguous, cheeky lyrics in general often remind me of Morrissey.

They also looked GREAT (and by "they" I mean Kate because I have the biggest crush on her.)

There's a film coming out soon named after Giddy Stratospheres, that is set in that particular era of Indie revival.
 
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Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
"Another drama by the kitchen sink tonight"

Dorian, who wrote most of the lyrics, was obviously VERY inspired by Moz and The Smiths.
Swallow Tattoo and You Could Have Both are quite obvious, but the ambiguous, cheeky lyrics in general often remind me of Morrissey.

Yeah, they were huge Moz fans, I would have loved to see them in a support slot and it might have given them a wider audience.

"I feel like C.C. Baxter in Wilder's 'Apartment'
That particular arrangement just came out of the blue
And who was it who sang 'I know that you love one
So why can't you love two?"
 
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