The Mumbles: "The Dust Left Behind" (New Album!)

Discussion in 'Other Music archive (read-only)' started by robertzombie, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. robertzombie

    robertzombie Member

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    The Mumbles have now completed their new album, "The Dust Left Behind". Stylistically it is a progression from 2008's "The Wire" and follows the rules set out by "Night Train". The album contains eleven songs and will be released on November 30th 2009.

    Some tracks from the album can be heard on the band's MySpace.

    They've decided to revamp three older songs but the main bulk of the album is completely new. The songs are mostly mid-tempo and, due to the recent acquisition of a session guitarist, contain a sprinkling of varying sounds.

    The record is predominantly keyboard-based (like their other releases) and is somewhat of a cementer in terms of style.

    With this album you will be given the choice of owning it either in a physical CD format, or in a downloadable MP3 format, or both.

    Tracklist:

    1. Fire Danse
    2. Control
    3. Night Train
    4. Getting The Fear
    5. The Machine
    6. Movement
    7. Twenty-Two
    8. Dream Of Mirrors
    9. The Fall
    10. Escape
    11. Superstition


    The album's out on November 30th and will be available on CD through Amazon.com, and as a download from Amazon (worldwide) and iTunes (worldwide) ;D

    *

    Review #1:

    DJs Jorge & Venus:

    Brilliant!!
    Starting with "Fire Danse"... a touch of Nick Cave vs. Bauhaus in "Slice of Life" vs. the dramaticity of Death In June in a modern key.

    Then "Control" offers the starter for a sober and elegant "new post-punk"... and "Night Train" is the absolute masterpiece of this album!

    Fits perfectly in this latest new-new wave of all the "lost sons of Joy Division", adding some good taste and elegance in it with the piano melodies.

    Favourite tracks:
    1. Night Train
    2. The Fall
    3. Twenty-Two
     
  2. robertzombie

    robertzombie Member

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    Mick Mercer review:

    When I first wrote about this band I was shocked by the lack of interest, which bordered on derisive suspicion. They bravely announce themselves on their business card as Gothic Orientated Piano Rock, which is far more modern and interesting as a concept than the majority of bands around. It seems quite obvious to me that if a band is using vocals and keyboards without any reliance on familiar crowd-pleasing norms and forms they need to have great songs to even force their heads above the surface. The Mumbles have plenty of great songs and while it may seem a relaxing variant on Gawf with a drum machine, it’s not really that either. James Ward and Robert Cowlin are coming out of a different drainage system, as close at times to Cult With No Name as they are Goth standards, but in their weirdly modest way they’re close to the album of the year here. So I wasn’t going senile, thank you, you simply weren’t paying attention.

    ‘Fire Danse’ is an easy opener, the keyboards gently ruffled by the vocal wind, the song stirring and lyrically dramatic, the shadows and worries closing in. ‘Control’ is so graciously tuneful it barely masks a jumble of disaffected emotional wreckage and increasing agitation, but the overall effect is strangely sanguine. ‘Night Train’ jangles darkly with a classic resonance and some unintentional lyrical humour as the chorus goes, ‘tickets please, you need to pay your fare, then I saw the night train… night train wasn’t there.’ (Cutbacks, eh?) Trust me, this song gets inside your head like an extra brain, with Emily Cox’s vocals also adding to the charm. That said, they really need an extra different verse to justify the length, or to have a shorter edit.

    ‘Getting The Fear’ has a prettier tone, but just as slinky a vocal touch, with Emily snaking around and guitar shading. ‘The Machine’ has the vocals spilling off the musical ledge, flopping at your feet, gazing up in recalcitrance then being sucked up in the spiralling, dizzying beauty, and spat out the top of our listening horizon. ‘Movement’ is a bit gloomier, but squeezes life out of the flat landscape with interesting shades of grey, so it has a quite different feel, with an uppity ‘Twenty-Two’ threatening to rock but this at least helps hide its weaknesses. It’s the dullest song here, but at least it remains briskly chattering.

    ‘Dream Of Mirrors’ returns us to the ludicrously appealing conventional melody laid bare and some wonderful lyrical confusion and smokescreens. (‘There's too many yes-girls, For his age old lie. If I could get sick from hypocrites, my God…’) ‘The Fall’ goes on a rickety keys adventure, the vocal avoiding the gaps and it’s a sleek bastard. ‘Escape’ goes the other way, vocals couched in defeat and gloomy concerns, offering stasis or worse as real life choices, as mournful keyboards shrug and paint a far from pretty picture. In many ways that would have made a more artistic closer than the capering ‘Superstition’ which flaunts some swish Goth moves, has a deep dark cortex, and ends abruptly, but maybe it isn’t emphatic enough, while the preceding doom was more impressive? Pah, a small quibble for such a fabulous record. It doesn’t enough matter they’ve still got a very basic sound either, and the sound isn’t as lusciously produced as it all deserves, because the songs make it what it is. The songs are alive, and coming for you. Unless you’re actually scared of convention subverted?

    Listening to The Mumbles is a bit like having a filthy secret when all your mates are into louder, spikier, snarling things. If it makes things any easier you can hide the record under your bed.
     
  3. robertzombie

    robertzombie Member

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