The Moz/Smiths Top 100, Part 239: SHAME IS THE NAME

How do you rate Shame Is The Name?


  • Total voters
    170

celibate

Forever Ill
Missed a few songs in the poll allready

gave it a generous 6, just an auto pilot song, as you hear the lyrics
it should've been more acoustic, or at least a bit of meloncholy in the
music, which isn't
just the same guitar laden songs like Boy Racer

good to see you polling agian Houdini

groetjes G. en aan A
 

Jamie

Bluff, Ardour & Assoc.
It’s all about the music maan!
Don’t you just love the brilliant keyboard line in the middle eight, and that wonderfully windswept harmonica? When did we last get harmonica in a Moz song?
And the guitar parts have a real energy and swagger about them.
And whilst it might not be lyrical genius, at least it’s not the usual mixture of clumsiness, bluntness and aggression that Moz passes off for lyrics so often these days. It’s such a relief to hear him reflect on things other than himself (and his unrequited plight) just for once...

When did we last NEED a harmonica in a Morrissey song, Maurice? ;)

It's all subjective. I'm glad you hear something in it. For me, it just leaves me cold. My Dearest Love was probably the best of the recent crop of B-sides. And, frankly, I think the Alain songs are lacking without his musical contributions. Many of his instrumentals on his myspace site have been more interesting musically than recent Morrissey songs. Again, my opinion. Because of My Poor Education was better, but I still hear a LOT of Trouble Loves Me in it.

Cheers,
Jamie
 
This is a fantastic song - way up there in his top 10 of the decade.
With a tale taking in the shame of politicians, the plight of feckless youth, the death of armed forces personnel, no-one else has written a song which is so 2009. Not only are the lyrics a welcome respite from the well-worn unrequited love theme, with some splendid turns of phrase (dim-ass teen on the spree!), but the music is wonderful too. Some fantastic guitar lines, a glorious keyboard part, a lovely windswept harmonica, and a brilliant sing-along chorus. As if that’s not enough, Chrissie Hynde drops by to contribute some gorgeous harmonies. Great work guys!

I agree. 8/10 for me.

Agreed. I think the use of POV in the song is really clever too, because (and this is purely my reading of it) I don't think the opening verses are Morrissey speaking. He sounds like an observer, narrating a conversation between the young boy/girl and the politician ("she laughed and said ...").

So it's the politician giving the typical Daily Mail-baiting lecture about drunken louts, but then Morrissey pulls him up on it in the last verse ("will you listen to yourself just once in your life"), and points out that he should feel just as ashamed as the kids he's lecturing.

And as you say, the music is fantastic. I love the harmonica in the break. Then there's that vocal, and his different creative ways of singing "what's your na-ha-hame ..."

Love it. 9/10.

Oooh, I'd never thought about the POV in that way or that deeply before, but now you say it, it makes sense. :)
 

Barking

Active Member
Oooh, I'd never thought about the POV in that way or that deeply before, but now you say it, it makes sense. :)

Oooh... POV...Kinda like Morrissey singing Ordinary Boys and someone telling him to stfu because he doesn't know anything about supermarket clothes? :) (it's true, I once found very nice pyjamas.)

Of course talking to a politician you wouldn't talk about undies and stuff. Would you. ("bras are ridiculously expensive. Why? It's pissing me off, Mr Prime Minister!" :mad:)

(small? :confused:
faces? :confused:
where? :confused:)
 
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Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.
Not as good as Education, but still strong. A 7.
 

ChristianDior

I've wasted my life...
A true 9.
Very solid song, politicians do in fact put people in early graves, and this is one of the most important message songs from Morrissey in this century. Jerry Finn, right now choirs of angels are in his celestial production booth going over tracks, because he was called home..
 

ChristianDior

I've wasted my life...
I found this :the sample at the beginning of the song is in French: "Salaud Mauricet, dégueulasse, tes jours sont comptés Mauricet... Il va t'arriver du mouron Mauricet!", which roughly translates to "Bastard Mauricet, disgusting, your days are numbered Mauricet... something fatal will happen to you Mauricet!". The 't' at the end of 'Mauricet' is silent and therefore the name sounds like 'Morrissey' to the English ear. The sample was lifted from the 1959 film "Les 400 coups" ("The 400 Blows)
My favorite track from the album, the sharpest sword..
 
D

Dave

Guest
This is a fantastic song - way up there in his top 10 of the decade.
With a tale taking in the shame of politicians, the plight of feckless youth, the death of armed forces personnel, no-one else has written a song which is so 2009. Not only are the lyrics a welcome respite from the well-worn unrequited love theme, with some splendid turns of phrase (dim-ass teen on the spree!), but the music is wonderful too. Some fantastic guitar lines, a glorious keyboard part, a lovely windswept harmonica, and a brilliant sing-along chorus. As if that’s not enough, Chrissie Hynde drops by to contribute some gorgeous harmonies. Great work guys!

That's a very good point and I totally agree with this.
 
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