The Moz/Smiths Top 100, Part 239: SHAME IS THE NAME

How do you rate Shame Is The Name?


  • Total voters
    170

Houdini

Junior Member
In 2007, and early 2008, we put up polls for all 234 then released Morrissey and The Smiths-songs. More than 25,000 votes were cast and the result was The Morrissey/Smiths Top 100, or indeed, The Morrissey/The Smiths Top 234. This year many people have asked me to continue with the polls as 18 new Morrissey-songs have been released since. With the release of 'Swords' now seems as good a time as any to start them.

Song 239: Shame Is The Name

Voting should be something along these lines:
10: Perfection
9: Near perfect, brilliant
8: Really good Moz/Smiths song
7: Good Moz/Smiths song
6: OK, Nothing special
5: Uninspired
4: Poor
3: Bad
2: Should never have been released
1: He should be ashamed

Previous polls (voting will remain open):

Part 238: I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris
Part 237: My Dearest Love
Part 236: Drive-In Saturday
Part 235: Children In Pieces
Part 234: That's How People Grow Up
Part 233: All You Need Is Me
Part 232 and previous
 
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CrookedLittleVein

Duck. Duck. Duck. Goose.
Seven. A good, solid song. The first few times I heard it, I thought it fell under the 'loud and stodgy' category of Morrissey song, but when I listened to it with headphones, I found it was suprisingly light and textured.

One criticism: Ms. Hynde is too far back in the mix. If this had been more of a duet*, I think it would have warranted an eight.

All-in-all, though, good stuff.

*If someone out there has the necessary software, I'd love to hear a more 'duety' version. :)
 

lottie

Love Me Outside!
I would give it a 10 but i was so shocked by the terrible grammar, (even though it works as part of the song) but i find it incredibly funny, so 9 it is..
:)
 

Barking

Active Member
It's a 7 but I'm being magnanimous. I's certainly not the daft lyrics that make it a 7 though (yeh we got them metaphors :rolleyes: and they're still poor lazy lyrics)(and I don't like the sentiment as always -as there's none) It's Ms Hynde and the catchy melody. The dialogue intro, even. That was cool. Ish.

Logically it's not Morrissey that gets those points then.:cool: "oops a daisy".
 

GlasgowChivas

Doing the Terrace Stomp
Seven. A good, solid song. The first few times I heard it, I thought it fell under the 'loud and stodgy' category of Morrissey song, but when I listened to it with headphones, I found it was suprisingly light and textured.

One criticism: Ms. Hynde is too far back in the mix. If this had been more of a duet*, I think it would have warranted an eight.

All-in-all, though, good stuff.

*If someone out there has the necessary software, I'd love to hear a more 'duety' version. :)

Totally agree about Hynde. You only really hear her in the last go around.

Still an 8 for me though.
 

Maurice E

Junior Member
This is a fantastic song - way up there in his top 10 of the decade.
With a tale taking in the shame of politicians, the plight of feckless youth, the death of armed forces personnel, no-one else has written a song which is so 2009. Not only are the lyrics a welcome respite from the well-worn unrequited love theme, with some splendid turns of phrase (dim-ass teen on the spree!), but the music is wonderful too. Some fantastic guitar lines, a glorious keyboard part, a lovely windswept harmonica, and a brilliant sing-along chorus. As if that’s not enough, Chrissie Hynde drops by to contribute some gorgeous harmonies. Great work guys!
 
This is a fantastic song - way up there in his top 10 of the decade.
With a tale taking in the shame of politicians, the plight of feckless youth, the death of armed forces personnel, no-one else has written a song which is so 2009. Not only are the lyrics a welcome respite from the well-worn unrequited love theme, with some splendid turns of phrase (dim-ass teen on the spree!), but the music is wonderful too. Some fantastic guitar lines, a glorious keyboard part, a lovely windswept harmonica, and a brilliant sing-along chorus. As if that’s not enough, Chrissie Hynde drops by to contribute some gorgeous harmonies. Great work guys!

Agreed. I think the use of POV in the song is really clever too, because (and this is purely my reading of it) I don't think the opening verses are Morrissey speaking. He sounds like an observer, narrating a conversation between the young boy/girl and the politician ("she laughed and said ...").

So it's the politician giving the typical Daily Mail-baiting lecture about drunken louts, but then Morrissey pulls him up on it in the last verse ("will you listen to yourself just once in your life"), and points out that he should feel just as ashamed as the kids he's lecturing.

And as you say, the music is fantastic. I love the harmonica in the break. Then there's that vocal, and his different creative ways of singing "what's your na-ha-hame ..."

Love it. 9/10.
 

Suedebread

The shop that never opens
I wanted to give it an 8, but then I started thinking of the bigger picture, and how there are songs across his entire catalogue that I would give an 8 but rate far above this. So after second-guessing myself a bit too much, it's a 7


And I agree with the poster saying Chrissie Hynde could do with being a wee bit higher in the mix.
 

Jamie

Bluff, Ardour & Assoc.
To me, the ardor for this song is a headscratcher. Can't-be-arsed lyrics and Alain's weakest B-side contribution since I Am Two People. It is very, very average - Chrissie Hynde or no.
 

Maurice E

Junior Member
To me, the ardor for this song is a headscratcher. Can't-be-arsed lyrics and Alain's weakest B-side contribution since I Am Two People. It is very, very average - Chrissie Hynde or no.


It’s all about the music maan!
Don’t you just love the brilliant keyboard line in the middle eight, and that wonderfully windswept harmonica? When did we last get harmonica in a Moz song?
And the guitar parts have a real energy and swagger about them.
And whilst it might not be lyrical genius, at least it’s not the usual mixture of clumsiness, bluntness and aggression that Moz passes off for lyrics so often these days. It’s such a relief to hear him reflect on things other than himself (and his unrequited plight) just for once...
 
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