The day Morrissey came to tea: an extract from Dave Haslam’s memoir

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Uncleskinny, May 13, 2018.

By Uncleskinny on May 13, 2018 at 8:10 AM
  1. Uncleskinny

    Uncleskinny It's all good Premium

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    The day Morrissey came to tea: an extract from Dave Haslam’s memoir - The Observer
    In book Sonic Youth Slept on My Floor, the DJ recalls how the Smiths changed British music, and his charming days spent with Morrissey – on photo shoots, at the Haçienda, and over cauliflower cheese

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    Also, interview with Miranda Sawyer in which the changes in Morrissey are mused upon - Morrissey is now "...uninformed, charmless, bitter and twisted..."

    Dave Haslam: ‘That music changed lives. It made Manchester what it is’ - The Observer

    Excerpt:

    What about Morrissey now? How do you feel about him?
    In the context of music, the Smiths were so valuable, they made such an impact… But I have no explanations for why Morrissey ended up saying the stuff he does. It is almost as though he’s another person. Everything he was – informed, charming, gentle – he is the opposite now – uninformed, charmless, bitter and twisted. It’s a strange one, especially because he says he hasn’t changed. From my perspective, he has.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 13, 2018
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Comments

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Uncleskinny, May 13, 2018.

    1. Uncleskinny
      Uncleskinny
      From total sympathy for the plight of the miners to the right-wing goon. What a journey.
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    2. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      :sleeping:
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    3. Uncleskinny
      Uncleskinny
      Also, interview with Miranda Sawyer in which the changes in Morrissey are mused upon - Morrissey is now "...uninformed, charmless, bitter and twisted..."

      https://www.theguardian.com/music/2...anchester-hacienda-sonic-youth-miranda-sawyer

      What about Morrissey now? How do you feel about him?
      In the context of music, the Smiths were so valuable, they made such an impact… But I have no explanations for why Morrissey ended up saying the stuff he does. It is almost as though he’s another person. Everything he was – informed, charming, gentle – he is the opposite now – uninformed, charmless, bitter and twisted. It’s a strange one, especially because he says he hasn’t changed. From my perspective, he has.
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    4. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      At least Haslam has the decency to say "from my perspective" which isn't a really intimate perspective from someone who last saw him in 1985. And this is the problem. We rarely get the point of view of people who knew/know him over a long period of time or who were/are really close to him. And when we do they are dismissed or not talked about. Instead we get the perspective of people who met him 5 times and therefore thought they knew him.
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    5. Surface
      Surface
    6. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      The Morrissey bit will be the only interesting piece In his book, as really who would want to read about Sonic Youth and their nocturnal activities? Also, I wonder how many times will he remind the reader that he went to the Hacienda?
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    7. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      "The bloke from Amberidge walk, well out he walked" would have been a much more interesting song.

      A lot of people think that Morrissey wasn't always a twat...That's bizarre. It was always there, it just got uglier, fed by money, fame, and (lol) power. When you're a charming young twat, people never think you can become an old horrible one. Yet, with a bit of imagintion...It's really not hard to foresee.
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    8. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      "The bloke from Amberidge walk, well out he walked" would have been a much more interesting song.

      A lot of people think that Morrissey wasn't always a bit of a twat...That's bizarre. I've felt it was always there, it just got uglier, fed by money, fame, and (lol) power.
      When you're a charming young twat, people never think you can become an old horrible one. Yet, with a bit of imagination...Picture the worse that can happen. In some cases it really does happen.

      He was never equipped to resist becoming what he did.
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    9. AztecCamera
      AztecCamera
      Reckon it should be titled "the day Steve came for orange mocha frappucinos". Reckon just like any other proud American, Uncle Steve loves his coffee inn nn n it and by the by m8, that photo of him and Sinead O'Connor drinking tea in a backyard in some foreign country during the 1991 tour was a staged photo op. Steve wasn't drinking tea. He hates tea. He just tells you foreigners what you want to hear so you can buy tickets every 4 years.
    10. Anaesthesine
      Anaesthesine
      It's true: Morrissey has always had a cold, cruel, sociopathic streak (to his credit, he's never tried to hide it). But the man also displayed empathy and a palpable kindness (particularly for animals).

      Part of the fascination has always been watching the kindness and the cruelty intertwine: that's given Morrissey a complexity and an edge that so many other artists lack. That duality provided much of the fascinating tension in his best work.

      He seems to lack the both the will and the energy lately to fight his darker impulses. All the kindness, and any residual gentleness has been burned away, leaving a core of cruelty and bitterness. It's not only repulsive, the result is a cardinal sin: Morrissey has become dull.

      Such a shame: he used to be one of the better (if more problematic) angels.
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    11. MrShoes
      MrShoes
      What is cauliflower cheese?

      MrShoes
    12. Charlie Cheswick
      Charlie Cheswick
      Possibly the worst food ever invented.
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    13. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Yeah, "sympathy". Right. I'm sure he sent them a big cheque...

      Morrissey is like Alice Morgan. He can recognize emotions and mimic them, but as he doesn't have Alice's brains, it's just comical when he does...

      His "why sympathize" on the morning show indicates he has lost that vague sense of shame. :laughing:
      Clearly last time he met a working class person was what, 1980? And by working class person I just mean a person who actually works...

      The miners should have taken him down the mine with them. He could have been their own little canary...

      "-Listen!! Morrissey has stopped singing!
      -Ah fuck."
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    14. Famous when dead
      Famous when dead


      The book summary fom his website:

      "Dave Haslam’s new book is out May 24th 2018.

      ‘Sonic Youth Slept on My Floor; Music, Manchester & More’ is writer and Hacienda resident DJ Dave Haslam’s gloriously well-written memoir of his life and work in some of the most interesting corners of contemporary culture.

      He documents encounters with inspiring characters including Tony Wilson, Nile Rodgers, Terry Hall, Neneh Cherry, Tracey Thorn, John Peel, Mark E Smith, Ian Brown, Laurent Garnier and David Byrne.

      He interviews Johnny Marr and John Lydon; Morrissey comes to tea; he meets writers including Raymond Carver and Jonathan Franzen; he discusses masturbation with Viv Albertine, and ecstasy with Roisin Murphy; he has a gun pulled on him at the Hacienda, a drug dealer threatens to slit his throat; and Sonic Youth sleep on his floor.

      In the late 1970s, a teenage John Peel listener and Joy Division fan, Haslam’s face was pressed against a window, looking out at a world of music, books, ideas. In 2017, four decades later, he finds himself in the middle of that world, collaborating with New Order on a series of five shows in Manchester.

      Haslam builds a rich context to the story of those decades; a definitive portrait of Manchester as a music city; the impact of life-shaking events (from the nightmare of the Yorkshire Ripper to the shock of the Manchester Arena terror attack); and how music has soundtracked his life, his times, his generation.

      ‘Sonic Youth Slept on My Floor’ is a masterful insider account of the Hacienda, the rise of Madchester and the birth of the rave era, and so much more ."

      http://www.davehaslam.com/#/sonic-youth-slept-on-my-floor/

      The book tour has him paired on a few nights with other guests:


      IMG_20180513_160852.jpg

      Regards,
      FWD.
      Last edited: May 13, 2018
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    15. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Not as dull as your journey. Think about it when you are in your local hospice. Lol. He grew, you got stunted. Btw, thought you got sacked :lbf:
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    16. Uncleskinny
      Uncleskinny
      I'm sure that meant something to you at some point.
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    17. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      another dig at Morrissey by the guardian with a passive aggressive twist.
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    18. Peppermint
      Peppermint
      Seriously? I had this conversation with Rifke on another thread. I thought it was a universal thing. It's cauliflower in a cheese sauce, baked in the oven. It should be noted that all cauliflower cheeses are not made equal. It can range from delicious to frightful grey lumpy sludge, depending on who's cooked it.
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    19. reelfountain
      reelfountain
      Brummie who enjoyed an expensive private education and sells himself as a streetwise Manc who was there when it all happened? I'm not interested in a word this man says. Total money-making phoney.
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