"Suedehead" (Original Instrumental) posted by RetroMusicWorld / YouTube (March 13, 2022)



Interesting.
🤔

Update:
Video made private - March 16, 2022.
Video made public again - March 26, 2022.



Comment posted by Gurglejerk:

Just a note: this track is not a true instrumental from the masters. This is an AI-generated track, using computer AI track separation to remove the vocals. It's good one, and shows how much AI track separation is improving. That YT channel also has a bunch of similar tracks as well as Everyday is Like Sunday (which isn't quite as well done).

If you want to experiment for yourself, try lalal.ai or moises.ai.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

ACTON

Don't Leave Us In The Dark
There was a silly financial dispute and I've also read that Morrissey didn't like that Street gave several interviews about them working together. But I guess you're also right that Morrissey was spoilt: Johnny Marr had rung his doorbell and then Stephen Street effortlessly took his place. Since he doesn't compose music himself, he must have thought that finding people like that would be just as easy in the future.
I think Street just asked to be paid what was agreed and Moz (via his late mother) balked at it. Street also wanted to appear on Top Of The Pops (a childhood dream) and Moz wouldn't. Moz is a lyrical and melodic genius but I'd say he is very frustrating to work with unless you 100% go along with his every whim.
 

Ketamine Sun

Now, today, tomorrow and always
💙

If at all possible, it'd be great if Morrissey could invite Vini to feature on one or two tracks on his next album.

Sadly, after a series of strokes, Vini
is unable to play guitar. I do hope he’s found another way to create music.
 

Eldritch

Well-Known Member
I think Street just asked to be paid what was agreed and Moz (via his late mother) balked at it. Street also wanted to appear on Top Of The Pops (a childhood dream) and Moz wouldn't. Moz is a lyrical and melodic genius but I'd say he is very frustrating to work with unless you 100% go along with his every whim.
It was something along the lines that for Viva Hate Street agreed on lower production points than was usual for somebody both producing and co-writing the album. When the album did so well, he asked for a bigger cut for the second album, which didn't go well with Morrissey.

As for your last point, here's a telling quote from Street in NME last year: "“We met in [London hotel] Claridge’s and I got involved in the reissue of ‘Viva Hate’. But he had it remastered again and took off the song ‘The Ordinary Boys’. When I disagreed with what he’d done, I was incommunicado again. There’s been the occasional little email, but I’ve not heard from him properly since.”
 

Ketamine Sun

Now, today, tomorrow and always
I think Street just asked to be paid what was agreed and Moz (via his late mother) balked at it. Street also wanted to appear on Top Of The Pops (a childhood dream) and Moz wouldn't. Moz is a lyrical and melodic genius but I'd say he is very frustrating to work with unless you 100% go along with his every whim.


Wonder what Morrissey’s side of the story was on that, since Street did appear in the Playboys promo video.
 

ACTON

Don't Leave Us In The Dark
It was something along the lines that for Viva Hate Street agreed on lower production points than was usual for somebody both producing and co-writing the album. When the album did so well, he asked for a bigger cut for the second album, which didn't go well with Morrissey.

As for your last point, here's a telling quote from Street in NME last year: "“We met in [London hotel] Claridge’s and I got involved in the reissue of ‘Viva Hate’. But he had it remastered again and took off the song ‘The Ordinary Boys’. When I disagreed with what he’d done, I was incommunicado again. There’s been the occasional little email, but I’ve not heard from him properly since.”
Thanks for the info. I'm getting to an age where anything I once knew is now locked in a crate at the back of my warehoused brain with rats falling over.

Ordinary Boys may not be the best song ever but it shouldn't have been taken off the reissue especially in favour of Treat Me Like A Human Being.
 
J

Js138

Guest
Thanks for the info. I'm getting to an age where anything I once knew is now locked in a crate at the back of my warehoused brain with rats falling over.

Ordinary Boys may not be the best song ever but it shouldn't have been taken off the reissue especially in favour of Treat Me Like A Human Being.
While I agree, I also feel it wasn’t Streets place to question the decision. After all it is Morrissey’s face on the cover.
 
A

Anon23

Guest
Amazing track. You can hear a few additional Vinny Reilly flourishes buried in the mix. What a musical combination that was. Did Street ever compose anything after Morrissey? Any co-writes? Would dearly love to see some behind the scenes of the production of this record. Thanks to whoever uploaded this.
In terms of Street co-writes, I know he worked with Australian band The Triffids on their album “The Black Swan” around 89, and then co-wrote some things with their frontman, the late, great David McComb, around 89-92. There’s a track floating around called “World’s Strongest Man” by the 2 of them, which is very much in the Viva Hate style, you can stream it here: https://thetriffids.com/audio-david-mccomb/
 
L

Lujissey

Guest
I wonder what Moz said from Johnny Marr's new album,,. I'd love to know what comments he makes with the people around him and what comments Moz makes with his specific mind... someone imagines that they think of the new work of the dwarf as they say to Don Johnny
 

hymeballs

New Member
wonderful to hear....Viva Hate is still my favorite Moz album precisely for the music....I still get goosebumps when Alsatian Cousin kicks off with such energy and rage with Moz screaming out his "We're you and he lovers?" .....perfection.
 

Redacted

I think I must be, absolutely, a total sex object.
wonderful to hear....Viva Hate is still my favorite Moz album precisely for the music....I still get goosebumps when Alsatian Cousin kicks off with such energy and rage with Moz screaming out his "We're you and he lovers?" .....perfection.
I love that so much too❤️
 
J

Juan Dulces

Guest
That Vini Reilly, a real musician's musician. A true artist who created his legacy on his own terms. I love his touches all over this album, like Suedehead and Little Man. He really fleshed out Street's compositions.

LC and Short Stories for Pauline are both excellent, and different from one another. Absolutely worth a listen if you've never heard Durutti Column or Vini R. not-on-Viva Hate before. Vini essentially created his own genre, and frequently redefined it in subtle ways.

If Vini had been a young man during the YouTube age, his discography would be as prolific as Prince's. Not comparing him to Prince as a performer in any way, but certainly Prince the musical artist/songwriter.
 

Redacted

I think I must be, absolutely, a total sex object.
That Vini Reilly, a real musician's musician. A true artist who created his legacy on his own terms. I love his touches all over this album, like Suedehead and Little Man. He really fleshed out Street's compositions.

LC and Short Stories for Pauline are both excellent, and different from one another. Absolutely worth a listen if you've never heard Durutti Column or Vini R. not-on-Viva Hate before. Vini essentially created his own genre, and frequently redefined it in subtle ways.

If Vini had been a young man during the YouTube age, his discography would be as prolific as Prince's. Not comparing him to Prince as a performer in any way, but certainly Prince the musical artist/songwriter.
I don't know that much about him but I know people have referred to him as the best guitarist in the world
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
That Vini Reilly, a real musician's musician. A true artist who created his legacy on his own terms. I love his touches all over this album, like Suedehead and Little Man. He really fleshed out Street's compositions.

LC and Short Stories for Pauline are both excellent, and different from one another. Absolutely worth a listen if you've never heard Durutti Column or Vini R. not-on-Viva Hate before. Vini essentially created his own genre, and frequently redefined it in subtle ways.

If Vini had been a young man during the YouTube age, his discography would be as prolific as Prince's. Not comparing him to Prince as a performer in any way, but certainly Prince the musical artist/songwriter.

It's really too bad Morrissey wouldn't pay Vini what he asked for. It was a mere pittance compared to the artistry he brought to the music. Same story as Stephen Street.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Wonder what Morrissey’s side of the story was on that, since Street did appear in the Playboys promo video.
Barely. Watch the promo again: Joyce, Rourke and Gannon get plenty of clear full-face shots, but Street is limited to a couple of shots on the edge of frame where he has his back to the camera, some close-ups of his hands at the keyboard, and a single 'blink and you'll miss it' shot of the camera flying over his head where his face is only half visible. Whoever shot/edited the video has clearly been instructed to keep his appearance at a minimum.

Not sure whether there were some politics going on, and Moz didn't want Street to get too big for his boots? It could have just been that Morrissey just felt his face 'didn't fit'. He's been known to be this petty before - the only reason Andrew Paresi (a phenominal drummer) didn't get to play live was because Morrissey didn't like his appearance, and I've heard stories of other potential musicians who didn't get to play a note when they turned up for auditions, purely because Moz didn't like the look of them.
 

Redacted

I think I must be, absolutely, a total sex object.
Wow Redacted! How honest of you to plainly state. After reading your post I got to thinking...it was like an epiphany because I had always assumed that I 'd missed The Smiths and totally wished they"d reunite one day....but now I think I'm realizing that Morrissey-on his own-for ME-was way more relatable, inspiring and truly more appealing than those Smiths' days because he became less of a dramatic spectacle/shocking performance of obscure sexual orientation?! etc., and more of an authentic, anima/animus archetype, who, in my eyes, grew to be a more captivating and endlessly interesting human being!

Morrissey's open letter to Marr stirred up an essential, unacknowledged truth...requiring further exploration of this vague hunch. And then your brave post Redacted~ instantly brought my own decades-long feelings regarding Morrissey into a psychic, ah-ha alignment.
I have realized it was, and always has been, a profound, artistic and loving attachment to Morrissey's tender soul. Because throughout our lives good music may come and go~ but the courageous words, the beautiful language, the meaningful sentiment, & the soul of the exquisitely human voice...communicating with such openness...as this 3-D, timeless, universal poet/ front man? Magic!

...So RARE... Listening to Morrissey has been so very life changing for the deepening of my awareness of the importance of virtue; and to the development my own creative soul ( not to mention for countless others!!! ) ~ And as I am always looking for true examples of daily inspiration in various, artistic forms of human expression to aid me along this perplexing journey through this often miserable society of sometimes cruel, uncaring, and unrefined people....Morrissey's poetic viewpoint, uttered aloud in his wise, calm, and yet feisty voice...as well as his integrity as a good human being with a noble heart....will ALWAYS win the day and keep me upright!

I have really had to think about what you said here, because it's so interesting (and some Jung too!).
I think you nailed the essence of Morrissey and unfortunately people like him are easily misunderstood and sometimes taken advantage of. I think far too many people have tried to ride his coattails and still do and that is why he is so protective of himself and untrusting of others.

As we have talked about before, I heard a new Morrissey here, esp in Alsatsian Cousin. I bought Viva Hate and popped it in the cassette player and that blared out and I thought WOW what is this? It kind of sounds like Roxy Music in their New Romantic period (Avalon). It is very sexual, very atmospheric, and VERY different from the Smiths, much more sophisticated than Handsome Devil. I was about dying when he got to the part where he says "But on the desk is where I want you!" I don't know what the song is about, I don't care, what it's about in my head is just fine lol.

Taking everything in it's totality and right up to present day and the now infamous letter, I think Marr was the least impressive collaborator. Morrissey started working with actual adults and professionals and it brought out this whole other confident side of him that I enjoyed a lot and still do. Tho Steven Street had been there for Strangeways and before and now for this new solo album (which I believe was a contractual obligation Marr walked out on, it was supposed to be a Smiths album and Morrissey being the consummate professional fufilled that obligation while Johnny played with The Pretenders, it's hilarious really. He wanted to be James Honeyman - Scott, and POOF he was. Actually, it's sad and typical Marr) I can only imagine how Marr felt when he just basically handed this smashing success to Morrissey, because Morrissey was pretty much forced to make this a solo album.

So Suedehead was really a nice preview of what was to come, it is an instantly catchy and instantly likeable song, very impressive for a first song with a new collaborator. Steven Street gets a lot of credit too, he just seems to have a very different temperment than Marr and says he would work with Morrissey again, he doesn't waste time throwing him under the bus and rolling it over him again and again.

I saw both the Kill Uncle and Your Arsenal tours which I think were his first US tours and it was just amazing, he was amazing, it was magical. Loved every second.
 

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