Strange/unexpected Moz references?

genuinely could not help myself and contacted the website to point out this article is fan fiction - hate fiction? - as none of these people ever professed to hate Morrissey, then i looked up the writer behind it (timmusic13 on twitter with 80 followers) and came away with a feeling of genuine pity for him as most of his activity on there is him trying to chat up Liam Gallagher with no success. Far Out does not seem to get a lot of engagement and their responses are rather immature. just about anybody can write and find a platform, however dubious, for their feelings, however dull, nowadays. Far Out more like Far-Fetched
Who does it name as hating Moz? I don't want to give them a click.
 
Who does it name as hating Moz? I don't want to give them a click.
Warlock Pinchers (that's right, who? they don't have a Wiki page and have all of 500 monthly listeners on Spotify but writing a song "Morrissey Rides a Cockhorse" riddled with coarse insults is evidently what puts them on the list), the other ex-Smiths (apparently all 3 of them make up 1 musician - did you know that? do THEY know that?), David Bowie, The National singer (the article about him some days earlier is likely what served as "inspiration" for this "piece") and yawn, Robert Smith. a hack job, beginning to end
 
Warlock Pinchers (that's right, who? they don't have a Wiki page and have all of 500 monthly listeners on Spotify but writing a song "Morrissey Rides a Cockhorse" riddled with coarse insults is evidently what puts them on the list), the other ex-Smiths (apparently all 3 of them make up 1 musician - did you know that? do THEY know that?), David Bowie, The National singer (the article about him some days earlier is likely what served as "inspiration" for this "piece") and yawn, Robert Smith. a hack job, beginning to end
Lol, pathetic. Amazing this is what passes for journalism.

Thanks for the info (y)
 
Five musicians that hate Morrissey

Article by numbers...
FWD.

I tried to guess who the 5 were before reading the article. I struggled a bit, which was a bit surprising… can’t remember the 5 I narrowed it down to but got 1 and a bit right:

Johnny Marr
Robert Smith
Billy Bragg
Michael Buble
Tori Amos
Paul Heaton
Fat Boy Slim
Cornershop

I suppose I should have said that National lead singer as that’s what prompted the article I guess - but I didn’t know his name and wanted to maintain some integrity in my silly little game :)
 
I tried to guess who the 5 were before reading the article. I struggled a bit, which was a bit surprising… can’t remember the 5 I narrowed it down to but got 1 and a bit right:

Johnny Marr
Robert Smith
Billy Bragg
Michael Buble
Tori Amos
Paul Heaton
Fat Boy Slim
Cornershop

I suppose I should have said that National lead singer as that’s what prompted the article I guess - but I didn’t know his name and wanted to maintain some integrity in my silly little game :)

I think I could have added Paul Weller to the list
 
I tried to guess who the 5 were before reading the article. I struggled a bit, which was a bit surprising… can’t remember the 5 I narrowed it down to but got 1 and a bit right:

Johnny Marr
Robert Smith
Billy Bragg
Michael Buble
Tori Amos
Paul Heaton
Fat Boy Slim
Cornershop

I suppose I should have said that National lead singer as that’s what prompted the article I guess - but I didn’t know his name and wanted to maintain some integrity in my silly little game :)

They forgot Mark E. Smith and Brix Smith, Tracey Thorn, Bernard Sumner, Matt Johnson, should we count the mild criticism by Sparks?
 
Another book I just got round to...
(2018 I believe it came out).

Screenshot_20230428-150919.png


Morrissey mentions re: Suggs' Suedehead, Madstock & going off him:
"We called Suggs.
Bette Bright, former singer of Deaf School (and sometime musical compatriot of Henry Priestman), answered the phone.
‘Hello,’ I said, sounding panicked. ‘Is Suggs there? Graham? Is Graham Suggs there?’
Silence.
‘Is that Bette? Ms Bright? Mrs Suggs?’
More silence.
‘Hello?’
‘He’s having his tea.’
‘Pardon?’
‘He’s having his tea. Who is this?’
‘It’s Mark. From the Danny Baker show. You know, the TV show that Suggs, er . . . Graham . . .’
‘Suggs,’ she said.
‘OK, that Suggs did a couple of weeks ago. We said we wanted him to do the show proper when it went live. Well, it’s going live. Now. And we really want him to do it. Now.’
Another pause.
‘Can I speak to him?’
‘He’s still having his tea. Call back in half an hour.’
Which I did. This time, Suggs answered the phone.
‘How was your tea?’ I asked innocently.
‘Lovely,’ replied Suggs. ‘So, what happened? I thought “Derek” [he used his real name, obviously] was doing the first show.’
‘Er, yes,’ I replied. ‘The thing is, he was going to do it, but then his manager said he wouldn’t let him do it without synthesisers . . .’
‘Ha!’ The sound of Suggs descending into a laughing-coughing fit fizzled down the phone.
‘Yes, well, anyway he’s not doing it now. So will you do it instead?’
‘When?’ said Suggs, supremely unflustered.
‘Um . . . tomorrow ?’ I said, with desperation in my voice. ‘Please . . .?’
Suggs thought about it for a moment.
‘OK,’ he said. ‘But I don’t want to do “If I Didn’t Care” again.’
I didn’t argue.
‘Do you know “Suedehead”?’ he asked.
‘The Morrissey song?’
‘Yeah. Can you play that?’
I ran it through in my head. Four chords tops, with a middle-eight – in the same key. No worries.
‘Absolutely!’ I assured him.
‘Ok, then let’s do that. I can’t get there before five. What time are we on?’
‘Six!’
‘Great. That gives us an hour. See you there.’
And it was done.
The next day, at the appointed hour, Suggs wandered into BBC TV Centre, in a dapper pale suit and shades with leopard-print frames that made him look like an extra from Casablanca . He was so suave that I almost swooned. The Bottlers welcomed him with open arms, like a long-lost relative. Everything about him oozed confidence and bonhomie. He was (and I do not say this lightly) the smoothest-looking man I had ever seen in my life.
An hour or so later, we took to the stage. The show started. We opened up with the theme tune that I’d ripped off Starsky & Hutch and ‘Peter Gunn’ and the crowd (all diehard Danny fans) went mad.
‘Kinda live from London . . .’ said Lori, the American announcer, actually a caller that Danny had befriended from his radio show.
‘It’s Danny Baker After All !’
As we played the theme tune, Danny walked onstage, and boy did his swagger seem mighty. He was the king of all that he surveyed and, in that instant, I felt prouder of those silly three chords than I had ever expected to feel. Then, on came Suggs and we ripped through ‘I’m Only Sleeping’, thrilled to be playing with someone who didn’t need electronic aids to sound absolutely ace.
The crowd loved Suggs and they loved Danny – that first show went by in a whirl. We finished with ‘Suedehead’, which was a delight to play – a big, rousing, silly, petulant song with a lovely, twangly guitar motif that put a tear in my eye. The show finished on a high, and we all went to the bar to drink our bodyweight in alcohol.
We had gotten away with it.
At the bar, I asked Suggs, ‘Why “Suedehead”? I mean, it’s a great song, but why that song?’
And then Suggs told me something I vaguely remembered reading about in the NME . Back in the August of 1992, Morrissey had been a late addition to Madness’s regular Madstock Festival in Finsbury Park. Ever the contrarian, Morrissey had misjudged the crowd, some of whom expressed their displeasure at his performance through the medium of throwing things – bottles, coins, a carton of orange juice. After nine songs, his pride presumably battered, Morrissey walked off the stage, never to return.
It seemed to me that playing ‘Suedehead’ on Danny Baker After All could be interpreted as an olive branch, a gesture of goodwill. But Suggs insisted that he just liked ‘the title and the song’ and was ‘tickled’ by the idea of ‘Suggs singing Morrissey’. As for Moz, the increasingly self-pitying whinge-bag probably just saw it as yet another sign that the whole world was against him, and that no one had ever suffered as profoundly, mightily or unjustly as he. I used to be a huge Morrissey fan, until finally – after many, many years defending his ‘misunderstood sense of humour’ – I finally got tired of apologising for a dreary old moo with a chip on his shoulder. The breakpoint came when Morrissey wrote a song encouraging people to stop watching the news and to spend more time listening to him complaining about how misunderstood he was.
As Sean Hughes memorably observed, everyone eventually grows out of their Morrissey phase . . . except Morrissey."

"...dreary old moo..."
FWD.
 
Morrissey wrote a song encouraging people to stop watching the news and to spend more time listening to him complaining about how misunderstood he was.’

really? is that what ‘SpentTDIB’ is about? could of fooled me.
 


"The Smiths and Morrissey are BIG infuences for this Song."
 
Morrissey wrote a song encouraging people to stop watching the news and to spend more time listening to him complaining about how misunderstood he was.’

really? is that what ‘SpentTDIB’ is about? could of fooled me.

it strikes me a bit odd to me that ‘STDIB’ would be the straw that broke the camels back? Given everything else… it’s just a nice little pop song…
 
thejamesdeanmuseum-30042023-0002.jpg


"Alain, Darrin & Keith are visiting all the way from England today! They especially loved seeing Jimmy's conga that Morrissey used in his "Suedehead" music video on display. #jamesdean #conga #actor #icon #rebel @morrisseyofficial"

@dneuer
Museum IG isn't sharing, but blurb from said.
Regards,
FWD.
 
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