Strange/unexpected Moz references?

Famous when dead

Vulgarian
Moderator

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Interesting.
FWD.
 

NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH #FBPB
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Well-Known Member
Bit obscure and might be a bit of a stretch (?) but "... a man who has never forgiven God for not making him Carrie Symonds." echoes Morrissey's dig at Brett Anderson "He'll never forgive God for not making him Angie Bowie." (Vox, May 1993)

 
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joe frady

Vile Refusenik
Bit obscure and might be a bit of a stretch (?) but "... a man who has never forgiven God for not making him Carrie Symonds." echoes Morrissey's dig at Brett Anderson "He'll never forgive God for not making him Angie Bowie." (Vox, May 1993)


"My Life is One Long Obscure Stretch" :brows:

First thing that popped into my bonce also. God help us. Please?

Pretty certain that he would be aware of its origins, seeing as how he was most likely in the room at the time Moz uttered that bon mot. Unless it was a...subconscious usage? There's alot of that around.

Anyway, í thought he might make the nod in the actual column ~ but he doesn't ~ so í pointed the line out to him on his ig. We'll see if he responds. What exciting lives we all lead...

https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/lif...ortance-of-provenance-has-never-been-clearer/


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Famous when dead

Vulgarian
Moderator
Further to my Coal Black Mornings post a few years ago, just getting round to this:

3b18131fc6c9bb6fd870a30937751a0c.jpg


Couple of references:

"To be honest, ‘My Insatiable One’ was a bit of an afterthought. It wasn’t until the record was released and the song started gathering attention in the press and cover versions by Morrissey that we belatedly realised what a gem it was. I had been aware that he had been to a couple of early shows and someone had even muttered that they thought they had seen him scribbling notes into a jotter at the back of the Camden Palace during our set. Whether he was learning the words to the song or not is debatable but it made it no less of a shock when one day while shuffling my way around Portobello Market one of the stall-holders selling boot-leg cassettes sidled up to me and pressed a tape recording from a Swiss gig of his into my sweaty palm. It was an odd experience listening to his version of the song when I got back to the flat. I seem to remember he’d taken out the swear-words and the band were obviously confused about how to translate our E-flat drop-tuning but to hear the voice that had been part of the very furniture of my youth singing my own words back to me of course cast an undeniable spell. More than anything though I think I perceived my early musical heroes as so much more than mere musicians. They were people who had helped me navigate my way through life, influencing my politics, suggesting how I should dress and even telling me what not to eat and so to hear such an unequivocal validation of my work by one of them was a wonderful but in some ways slightly confusing moment, like when the teacher is finally bested by his pupil, and I remember lying on my fusty purple bedspread in Moorhouse Road listening to it one drizzly afternoon overcome with a strange blend of triumph and melancholy. With hindsight relegating ‘My Insatiable One’ to the status of a B-side was the first in a long line of bad judgements that we made, exiling classics to the wastelands of the flip side, limiting their audience and so rendering the albums weaker by their absence but at the same time this profligacy was conscious and deliberate; we wanted every moment of our output to be notable, even, and in some ways especially the B-sides. I suppose appropriately it was very much something we had taken from The Smiths whose flip sides for a period were superlative. It made being a fan feel so thrilling, like the band were honouring your devotion with a gift, and it was this sense of breathless discovery that we wanted to continue with our work. Nonetheless if ‘My Insatiable One’ and ‘To The Birds’ and ‘He’s Dead’ and ‘The Big Time’ had been on the debut it simply would have been a better record."

"We took the dizzying, drastic step of deciding to start again from scratch, reconvening at Townhouse Studios and this time hiring Stephen Street as a safe pair of hands to try to guide us back towards the shores of sanity. Stephen had of course worked with the Smiths on most of their seminal records and so collaborating with him was in many ways an exciting experience for me, embedded as those records were within the very fabric of my childhood. His track record speaks for itself and I very much enjoyed his clarity and drive which were utterly galvanising. In many ways though it’s a shame that his work with us coincided with our career nadir as I feel that the failure of the record prevented any further journey together. By this point we had possibly become tired of the songs and even Stephen’s great skills couldn’t quite tease out in us that wild-eyed excitement that is always required as we dutifully ran through what were in some cases the third or fourth version of the same track, a dulling, colourless process that I think bled through somehow into the final recordings."


📖➡️PM
Regards,
FWD.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Well-Known Member
"My Life is One Long Obscure Stretch" :brows:

First thing that popped into my bonce also. God help us. Please?

The truth is, we're hopelessly, helplessly, godlessly, lost. But that's OK.



What exciting lives we all lead...
.

So exciting in fact that I spent a whole rainy afternoon reading up on potential meetings between B & M in 1993. 🤪🥴

Until today, I wasn't aware that there had even been a debate about whether or not they'd actually met, because I remembered Brett's less than flattering comments about M's shyness, but reading Brett's response to the Angie Bowie quip, it seems there was a whole 'Suedegate' situation going on.

The whole thing is only mildly interesting (at least to any normal person), but very messy in a very typical Morrissey way and quite entertaining.

March 1993, The Face:
Brett's infamous 'useless teenager' comment. (If anyone has access to the full interview, it would be much appreciated.)

TheFaceMarch1993BrettAndersononMoz.jpg


March 1993, NME:
Brett talks with Bowie and Steve Sutherland, many Morrissey mentions, Brett is willing to give him the benefit of the doubt with regards to Madstock, doesn't mention meeting him in person though


April 1993, The Face prints letter by Morrissey’s press representative (that would have been MC at the time, correct?) stating he'd never met Brett (if anyone happens to have a scan of said letter, it would be much appreciated.)

April 1993, Vox interview with Brett by Max Bell
Bell confronts Brett with Morrissey's statement

Vox1993MorrisseyResponse.jpg


Brett states the following:

"The Face completely misconstrued what I said. The girl was doing the interview on a train. Maybe she heard the wheels rumbling. She got that wrong. I expect he is pissed off, and I don't blame him. I would be too. There are a section of people who work for the Face who may be amongst the most stupid people who ever lived. Really. They're absolute idiots. [...]
The only good thing you can say about the Face is that nobody actually buys that magazine to read it … apart from Morrissey, I suppose. Nah. I'm sure I'd remember if I met him. It's hardly the kind of thing you forget really, is it?"

Also in April, Melody Maker chimed in and reported the story, calling The Face a "rheumatic style rag"

May 1993, The Face prints the Suedegate article, stating

"We have Brett's interview on tape, and despite the distant hum of train wheels, his comments on Morrissey are clearly audible and beyond dispute."

Also included is a statement from Suede's press representatives:

"We understand from conversations with Brett that he has indeed met Morrissey, albeit briefly and before Brett himself became famous. It is likely that in the middle of a hectic promotional schedule in France (where the FACE interview took place), Brett made more of this meeting than either Morrissey could have done or indeed Brett would have liked to have done in hindsight."


Oh, the drama. :drama:



The funniest thing is that I was always under the impression that this picture had been taken in January 1993, which would make the whole argument utterly pointless.
Apparently not.

Moz&Brett,QAwards1993.jpg


I know it was at the 1993 Q Awards, but I can't seem to find the correct date... January 1994, perhaps?
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Well-Known Member
Posted here because Moz was supposed to headline last year...


 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
Further to my Coal Black Mornings post a few years ago, just getting round to this:

View attachment 72998

Couple of references:

"To be honest, ‘My Insatiable One’ was a bit of an afterthought. It wasn’t until the record was released and the song started gathering attention in the press and cover versions by Morrissey that we belatedly realised what a gem it was. I had been aware that he had been to a couple of early shows and someone had even muttered that they thought they had seen him scribbling notes into a jotter at the back of the Camden Palace during our set. Whether he was learning the words to the song or not is debatable but it made it no less of a shock when one day while shuffling my way around Portobello Market one of the stall-holders selling boot-leg cassettes sidled up to me and pressed a tape recording from a Swiss gig of his into my sweaty palm. It was an odd experience listening to his version of the song when I got back to the flat. I seem to remember he’d taken out the swear-words and the band were obviously confused about how to translate our E-flat drop-tuning but to hear the voice that had been part of the very furniture of my youth singing my own words back to me of course cast an undeniable spell. More than anything though I think I perceived my early musical heroes as so much more than mere musicians. They were people who had helped me navigate my way through life, influencing my politics, suggesting how I should dress and even telling me what not to eat and so to hear such an unequivocal validation of my work by one of them was a wonderful but in some ways slightly confusing moment, like when the teacher is finally bested by his pupil, and I remember lying on my fusty purple bedspread in Moorhouse Road listening to it one drizzly afternoon overcome with a strange blend of triumph and melancholy. With hindsight relegating ‘My Insatiable One’ to the status of a B-side was the first in a long line of bad judgements that we made, exiling classics to the wastelands of the flip side, limiting their audience and so rendering the albums weaker by their absence but at the same time this profligacy was conscious and deliberate; we wanted every moment of our output to be notable, even, and in some ways especially the B-sides. I suppose appropriately it was very much something we had taken from The Smiths whose flip sides for a period were superlative. It made being a fan feel so thrilling, like the band were honouring your devotion with a gift, and it was this sense of breathless discovery that we wanted to continue with our work. Nonetheless if ‘My Insatiable One’ and ‘To The Birds’ and ‘He’s Dead’ and ‘The Big Time’ had been on the debut it simply would have been a better record."

"We took the dizzying, drastic step of deciding to start again from scratch, reconvening at Townhouse Studios and this time hiring Stephen Street as a safe pair of hands to try to guide us back towards the shores of sanity. Stephen had of course worked with the Smiths on most of their seminal records and so collaborating with him was in many ways an exciting experience for me, embedded as those records were within the very fabric of my childhood. His track record speaks for itself and I very much enjoyed his clarity and drive which were utterly galvanising. In many ways though it’s a shame that his work with us coincided with our career nadir as I feel that the failure of the record prevented any further journey together. By this point we had possibly become tired of the songs and even Stephen’s great skills couldn’t quite tease out in us that wild-eyed excitement that is always required as we dutifully ran through what were in some cases the third or fourth version of the same track, a dulling, colourless process that I think bled through somehow into the final recordings."


📖➡️PM
Regards,
FWD.

Wonder wot he made of The Dame's cover... ;)



Plus, í love the notion of Morrissey plotting his way around the back boozers of Camden, 'jotter' in hand... 📒

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