Stephen Street tweets about "Suedehead" in live set

This is a pretty sterling endorsement, considering his earlier thoughts on the live renditions of his Morrissey songs. I'm glad he and Morrissey came to grips with each other in later years. Morrissey likely would have sank as a budding solo artist without Street's partnership in the early days. He made the transition from The Smiths to solo nigh-on seamless.

It's unfortunate that the bass playing comment comes off as a slur against Gary Day, who played bass on most all the live versions of "Suedehead." He grew into the early solo material with aplomb on later tours - and, for my money, is perhaps the most underrated of all Morrissey's solo musicians.
 

MozIsGod

Active Member
It's unfortunate that the bass playing comment comes off as a slur against Gary Day, who played bass on most all the live versions of "Suedehead." He grew into the early solo material with aplomb on later tours - and, for my money, is perhaps the most underrated of all Morrissey's solo musicians.

I'm glad we finally have footage now of Andy Rourke playing Suedehead at the Wolverhampton gig. Street's bass line sounds like something Rourke would have come up with!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
nice to see as i like street and i didnt know that about the past bass parts
 

VivaGil

i've got no charm
On the bass comment, I really like Mando. Solomon always seemed to never ever stand out but maybe it's a moving thing. Mando is great and I think fits in with the band's aesthetic.
 

celibate

Forever Ill
It's unfortunate that the bass playing comment comes off as a slur against Gary Day, who played bass on most all the live versions of "Suedehead." He grew into the early solo material with aplomb on later tours - and, for my money, is perhaps the most underrated of all Morrissey's solo musicians.


Amen, Gaz had style, with his standing bass, but always when using the normal guitar, a bit hiding,
he was mostly behind Boz doing his job, on stage , indeed he became from a rock-a billy to a good bass player,
underrated, as Spencer.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
On the bass comment, I really like Mando. Solomon always seemed to never ever stand out but maybe it's a moving thing. Mando is great and I think fits in with the band's aesthetic.

Yes he fits in well with Martin in the carrying of timber department.

Benny-the-British-Butcher
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#Morrissey - Suedehead - live FYF Fest, August 23, 2015 https://youtu.be/x0d0mZlj8_o via @YouTube Proud to see this still in the set!

Also pleased to hear the bass player playing the line I played on the record unlike earlier line ups in Morrissey's bands

Great drumming from my friend Matt Walker also! #class

dont know if this is whatb you mean or cant see but ill try to help
 

Reggie-Kray

Krayism
It seems unfathomable to me (as a guitar player), why any bass player would tour with any band playing one of their famous hits live and play something different. Surely, you would sit down with your bass, listen to the song and learn the parts exactly section by section? The first band I ever auditioned with I knew they covered Rock'n Roll Suicide by Bowie, so I sat down and learnt Ronson's guitar part the night before and even programmed my stomp box with the same tremelo effect. When my guitar kicked in, that's what they wanted to hear. If I'd started blues soloing it would have been something else.
 

Detritus

Teenage Lightning
It seems unfathomable to me (as a guitar player), why any bass player would tour with any band playing one of their famous hits live and play something different. Surely, you would sit down with your bass, listen to the song and learn the parts exactly section by section? The first band I ever auditioned with I knew they covered Rock'n Roll Suicide by Bowie, so I sat down and learnt Ronson's guitar part the night before and even programmed my stomp box with the same tremelo effect. When my guitar kicked in, that's what they wanted to hear. If I'd started blues soloing it would have been something else.
I'm a guitar player as well, and while I think there is something to be said for the ability to competently replicate music as written, many musicians (myself included) enjoy a little creative improvisation when appropriate, if only to curb the monotony of playing the same songs night after night. There are times when a disciplined and meticulous reproduction of a piece is expected, such as a part in an orchestral performance of a revered composition or a broadway score, but in the world of rock and roll performance I think the expectation for a rigidly faithful interpretation of the recorded music is not as great.

Of course, eyebrows will inevitably raise if the arrangement of a beloved song is radically altered (see: the fan reaction to Bowie's '95 tour, in particular that version of "The Man Who Sold the World"), but in general, only ever playing a song one particular way seems totally contradictory to the creative impulse, and I suspect that's why so many professional touring artists and musicians do leave room for improvisation and change in their live performances.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I'm a guitar player as well, and while I think there is something to be said for the ability to competently replicate music as written, many musicians (myself included) enjoy a little creative improvisation when appropriate, if only to curb the monotony of playing the same songs night after night. There are times when a disciplined and meticulous reproduction of a piece is expected, such as a part in an orchestral performance of a revered composition or a broadway score, but in the world of rock and roll performance I think the expectation for a rigidly faithful interpretation of the recorded music is not as great.

Of course, eyebrows will inevitably raise if the arrangement of a beloved song is radically altered (see: the fan reaction to Bowie's '95 tour, in particular that version of "The Man Who Sold the World"), but in general, only ever playing a song one particular way seems totally contradictory to the creative impulse, and I suspect that's why so many professional touring artists and musicians do leave room for improvisation and change in their live performances.

this is true but i think with an audition they probably want to see if you can play it replicate it and learn it as it is especially for a " song like ..suicide" (hmm thats not a bad song title imo) and if they take you you can then start to feel your way through some improved interplay. i think id be to nervous to try that at an audition. skill could have also maybe i guess have been an issue though i really doubt it
 

AztecCamera

Well-Known Member
Learn the opening guitar "riff". It's pretty easy and has got me laid after Morrissey concerts more times than I can remember. Anonymous-
 

Reggie-Kray

Krayism
I'm a guitar player as well, and while I think there is something to be said for the ability to competently replicate music as written, many musicians (myself included) enjoy a little creative improvisation when appropriate, if only to curb the monotony of playing the same songs night after night. There are times when a disciplined and meticulous reproduction of a piece is expected, such as a part in an orchestral performance of a revered composition or a broadway score, but in the world of rock and roll performance I think the expectation for a rigidly faithful interpretation of the recorded music is not as great.

Of course, eyebrows will inevitably raise if the arrangement of a beloved song is radically altered (see: the fan reaction to Bowie's '95 tour, in particular that version of "The Man Who Sold the World"), but in general, only ever playing a song one particular way seems totally contradictory to the creative impulse, and I suspect that's why so many professional touring artists and musicians do leave room for improvisation and change in their live performances.

yes, I can see both sides of this. I suppose the crux of the matter is whether or not the interpretation of the part is true or sympathetic to the song. I think there's a fine line, especially with bass lines as they do create part of the harmony of the music which, if changed too dramatically, can change the sound of certain notes in the vocal melody. I used to get frustrated watching Alain playing There is A Light, it seemed unnecessarily complicated and the difference was critical to the sound of how Johnny and Craig Gannon played it live with the use of capos and open chords. Personally, I love watching McCartney's band playing stuff faithful to Sgt. Pepper and Floyd doing Comfortably Numb, and watching Marr playing Girl Afraid and Some Girls is just incredible. I also love watching bands playing live like The Stone Roses with that brilliant loose interplay and improvisation, Marr's current band I also like the way they rearrange songs live.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
yes, I can see both sides of this. I suppose the crux of the matter is whether or not the interpretation of the part is true or sympathetic to the song. I think there's a fine line, especially with bass lines as they do create part of the harmony of the music which, if changed too dramatically, can change the sound of certain notes in the vocal melody. I used to get frustrated watching Alain playing There is A Light, it seemed unnecessarily complicated and the difference was critical to the sound of how Johnny and Craig Gannon played it live with the use of capos and open chords. Personally, I love watching McCartney's band playing stuff faithful to Sgt. Pepper and Floyd doing Comfortably Numb, and watching Marr playing Girl Afraid and Some Girls is just incredible. I also love watching bands playing live like The Stone Roses with that brilliant loose interplay and improvisation, Marr's current band I also like the way they rearrange songs live.

Yes I can understand perfectly what your saying, it makes perfect sense until my mind wanders and I start seeing/hearing Jesse Tobias destroying his guitar ! Actually that's cruel of me to single him out they're all terrible in their own right but money must be tight for Steven without a record deal, I wouldn't be surprised if they just perform for free just to see the world.

Benny-the-British-Butcher
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Once again this video is a Perfect example of the ineptitude of Jesse Tobias on guitar.

WTF was he playing???

That was terrible.
 

Ben Budd

Well-Known Member
Once again this video is a Perfect example of the ineptitude of Jesse Tobias on guitar.

WTF was he playing???

That was terrible.

Really? I've seen him do Suedehead a few times and think it sounds great.
 

Guernie

Member
Why rip Jesse ? The song is recognizable , the crowd is singing along and loving it plus Moz is really enjoying the moment . Some anony-mouses are never happy .
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Why rip Jesse ? The song is recognizable , the crowd is singing along and loving it plus Moz is really enjoying the moment . Some anony-mouses are never happy .

To misquote the great man himself, I hope Jesse Tobias dies in a multiple pile-up on the M3. Then I'll be happy. :)
 

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