Some of the lyrics in YATQ are just plain EMBARRASSING.

S

Suuuuuey!!

Guest
Some of the lyrics in YATQ are embarrassing. The music is very pleasant, which at first disguises what's yet to unfold. A cringe-worthy set of lines like "you know where you can shove your hamburger", "thru hail and snow I'd go just to moon you" and "policewomen, policemen, silly women, tax men", "she told me she loved me which means she must be insane", and the list goes on and on. NO way would I share this album with anyone who wasn't already a Morrissey fan. After listening they'd look at me as if I were crazy!

These are lyrics from a mind ("oh, the squalor of the mind") that has grown tired and lost its creativity . There's no fire, there's no passion. Sit down and compare the passion and drama of any lyric from a Smiths song to this load of crap. I'm sorry (not that I should have to even apologize) but YATQ is half-hearted at best. I've loved Morrissey/The Smiths since the mid 80's, but this ride has been a gentle decline that's become less and less fulfilling as the years go by.

The magic cure?? That would be Johnny Marr coming back on board but we all know that will never happen.

The world IS full of crashing bores...and YATQ proves it.
 
S

Suuuuuey!!

Guest
Re: e.m.b.a.r.r.a.s.s.i.n.g!

Every
Morrissey
Bar
And
Refrain
Releases
A
Sort of
Sick
Intolerable
Nauseating
Gutteral response.
 
L

LoafingOaf

Guest
> Some of the lyrics in YATQ are embarrassing. The music is very pleasant,
> which at first disguises what's yet to unfold. A cringe-worthy set of
> lines like "you know where you can shove your hamburger",
> "thru hail and snow I'd go just to moon you" and
> "policewomen, policemen, silly women, tax men", "she told
> me she loved me which means she must be insane", and the list goes on
> and on. NO way would I share this album with anyone who wasn't already a
> Morrissey fan. After listening they'd look at me as if I were crazy!

I see nothing wrong with any of the lyrics you hold up to ridicule. Morrissey's lyrics stand out because he's an original. Sui generis. Everyone is like, "Jesus, what kind of song is that???" Because they're too used to crashing bores.

And, yes, you know where you can shove your hamburger. Right up your ass. That's what Morrissey is telling hamburger eaters like yourself. Obviously he struck a nerve there. You probably just got back from the Wendy's drive-thru. Admit it.

I like that lyric. It vaguelly reminds me of Leonard Cohen's opener on his now-classic album "The Future": "Give me crack and anal sex/Take the only tree that's left/and stuff it up the hole in your culture."

"Through hail and snow I'd go just to moon ya."

What exactly is wrong with that? You're not putting anything on the table which would reveal whether or not you have a clue. You just quote a lyric and do a HA HA HA. Sorry, that doesn't cut it.

"policewomen, policemen, silly women, tax men"

You're a silly woman, obviously. And a crashing bore. He apparently struck a nerve there, too.

> These are lyrics from a mind ("oh, the squalor of the mind")
> that has grown tired and lost its creativity .

And who are you? You just SIT THERE.

>There's no fire, there's no
> passion. Sit down and compare the passion and drama of any lyric from a
> Smiths song to this load of crap. I'm sorry (not that I should have to
> even apologize) but YATQ is half-hearted at best. I've loved Morrissey/The
> Smiths since the mid 80's, but this ride has been a gentle decline that's
> become less and less fulfilling as the years go by.

Since the mid-80s. So you're rather old. See, some people age without getting old. Morrissey, for example.

You, on the other hand.....

> The magic cure?? That would be Johnny Marr coming back on board but we all
> know that will never happen.

Yawn.

Marr was at the Manchester show. Do you think he went home feeling GLAD that he quit on Morrissey? His album tanked. Morrissey was in a sold out arena where Marr was just another face in the crowd trying to grab a packet of badges.

> The world IS full of crashing bores...and YATQ proves it.

No, you've proved it.

I love silly people who laugh laugh laugh and think they're in on the joke, when actually the joke's on you.
 
S

Suuuuuey!!

Guest
> And, yes, you know where you can shove your hamburger. Right up your ass.
> That's what Morrissey is telling hamburger eaters like yourself. Obviously
> he struck a nerve there. You probably just got back from the Wendy's
> drive-thru. Admit it.

I'm on the raw foods diet. Mostly raw veggies, fruits, nuts, granola, etc. I never eat red meat and when I do eat flesh it's fish only. I'm 33 years old, 5'9" and 150lbs with a 32" waist. Hardly a fat ass, jackass.

You're a hostile prick, just like the rest of them.
 
S

Suuuuuey!!

Guest
I obviously struck a nerve. May your blood pressure rise and your heart fail.
 
L

LoafingOaf

Guest
Austria Gets Tough on Animal Cruelty - See, Mozza, your influence means something! Take a bow!

> I'm on the raw foods diet. Mostly raw veggies, fruits, nuts, granola, etc.
> I never eat red meat and when I do eat flesh it's fish only. I'm 33 years
> old, 5'9" and 150lbs with a 32" waist. Hardly a fat ass,
> jackass.

Well, good for you. So what's your issue with the lyrics you held up to ridicule? I saw nothing wrong with any of them.

I made my speculation about you because a lot of people over the years have HA-HA-HA-ed at Morrissey's lyrics that attack animal cruelty.

But they are the ones who will be condemned by history one day.

The tide is already changing pretty strongly in Europe, as I read in the Cleveland Plain Dealer this morning:

=====

Austria gets tough on animal cruelty
Friday, May 28, 2004
William J. Kole
Associated Press
Vienna, Austria - Hens will be free to run around barnyards, lions and tigers will vanish from circus acts, and Dobermans will sport what nature intended - floppy ears and longer tails - under a tough animal rights law adopted Thursday in Austria.

The anti-cruelty law, one of Europe's harshest, will ban pet owners from cropping their dogs' ears or tails, force farmers to uncage their chickens, and ensure that puppies and kittens no longer swelter in pet shop windows.

Violators will be subject to fines of $2,420, and in cases of extreme cruelty could be fined up to $18,160 and have their animals seized by the authorities.

Lawmakers, some holding stuffed toy animals, voted unanimously to enact the law, which takes effect in January and will be phased in over several years. Chancellor Wolfgang Schuessel said Austria was sending a stern message to the rest of Europe and the world about respecting animals.

"Austria is taking the role of pioneer," Schuessel told parliament, vowing to press for similar legislation across the European Union. "This new law will give both producers and consumers a good feeling, and it lifts animal protection to the highest level internationally."

It's the latest example of how the animals rights issue is gaining attention across Europe:

The European Commission has proposed a sweeping overhaul of EU regulations on transporting livestock across the continent to give more protection to the hundreds of thousands of animals that are shipped daily and to prevent deaths and abuse.

In March, Hungary's parliament banned cockfighting and the breeding or sale of animals for fighting, and it made animal torture - previously a misdemeanor - a felony punishable by up to two years in prison.

Last summer, the region of Catalonia, which passed Spain's first animal cruelty law in 1988, banned the killing of abandoned cats and dogs in animal shelters and raised fines for cruelty to as much as $24,200.

Austrians' love for animals dates to imperial times, with the famed Lipizzaner stallions pampered as a source of national pride.

Aimed primarily at poultry and other livestock, Austria's new law also outlaws the use of lions and other wild animals in circuses and makes it illegal to restrain dogs with chains, choke collars or "invisible fences" that administer mild electric shocks to confine animals.

The measure enjoyed the support of all four main parties in the National Assembly, where Minister of Social Affairs Herbert Haupt drew laughter by holding up a stuffed toy dog while addressing lawmakers Thursday.

Haupt, a veterinarian, had pushed for the law since the 1980s.

It still needs the president's signature, a formality given its unanimous passage.

The Austrian Farm Federation opposed the law, arguing that it will increase costs for farmers and could lead to more imports of poultry from countries with looser restrictions.

Chicken farmers will be allowed several years to phase in the new rules. Those who recently invested in new cages will have until 2020 to turn their birds loose to run free inside fences.

© 2004 The Plain Dealer. Used with permission.
=====
 
L

LoafingOaf

Guest
Why don't you just admit your thread-starting message was asinine. You didn't supportyour assertions
 
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