Smiths Legacy

  • Thread starter An observer (Repost)
  • Start date
A

An observer (Repost)

Guest
Past Observer message is being reposted here WITH PERMISSION OF AN OBSERVER.

This is Observer's answer to LWF... Observer talks about his view of Smiths legacy...

//Repost Starts...

> Here is the quote in context:

> "He moves on to talk about the record sleeve of "Hand In
> Glove", which depicts a nude male. This also is no gimmick.

> 'I wanted to even the balance out', he says. 'It's crucial to what we're
> doing that we're not looking at things from a male stance. I can't
> recognise gender. I want to produce music that transcends boundaries.

> 'I want it to get through to everybody. I don't want it directed at just
> one generation. I want people to enjoy the music and also to think about
> what's being said.'"

> MELODY MAKER, September 3, 1983

> Morrissey isn't talking about the North/South divide. True, the quote at
> first refers specifically to sexuality, which doesn't necessarily bolster
> my argument, either, but then he goes on to mention age
> ("generation") and then makes a few general comments about what
> he expects from fans. Clearly his views on politics and society were
> extrapolated from the ideas he was most passionate about-- issues of
> gender equality-- and I chose this quote because it expresses, both in and
> out of context, the point I was making, which is that The Smiths set out
> to exclude nobody.

> The North/South divide was much on his mind, of course, but that was only
> a small part of a larger, mostly coherent ethos. I can produce hundreds of
> quotes that back up my argument and if you've followed The Smiths as
> closely as you claim over the years, you know it.

> Besides, you've only proven my point. You say, or at the very least imply,
> that Morrissey (before he apparently lost his mind in L.A., of course)
> would never have sung for the "Mexican trash" that now populate
> his SoCal audience. Well, what are these working class Latino kids if not
> the counterparts of the sons and daughters of the coal miners in Northern
> England? Didn't Morrissey himself come from squalor? Didn't he wear tatty
> old blue jeans with patches on them as some symbol that "real"
> humanity resided with the lower classes? Wasn't one of his favorite Wilde
> quotes, one which was used on a t-shirt (although I don't know if it was
> official 'Smithdom' or not), "All of us are born in the gutter, but
> some of us are looking at the stars?"

> Stars: the film personalities you mention. Rightly so, they were and are a
> big part of his life. Let's forget for a moment that a number of them,
> such as James Dean and Dick Davalos, were American. His favorite films
> were the post-war British variety, the ones where Cockney accents were
> finally permitted, for instance, and the awful squalor of life was allowed
> onscreen. The term, I think, is "bedsit" or "kitchen
> sink" dramas. Shelagh Delaney's "A Taste of Honey"-- and I
> dare you to try and convince me or anyone that there is a work of art that
> has had a greater influence on Morrissey-- begins thus: "The stage
> represents a comfortless flat in Manchester and the sreet outside. Jazz
> music. Enter HELEN, a semi-whore, and her daughter, JO. They are loaded
> with baggage." You mentioned some "trashy whores" coming to
> the L.A. gigs-- I'll bet one, or many of them, might have been a heroine
> in a Shelagh Delaney play.

> I'm not telling you anything you don't know. What I submit to you is that
> you are completely failing to see the correspondence between the England
> that Morrissey loved and the Latino culture here in L.A. In 2002, isn't it
> possible that play could open like this? "The stage represents a
> comfortless flat in Echo Park and the sreet outside. Hip-hop music. Enter
> MARIA, a semi-whore, and her daughter, SILVIA. They are loaded with
> baggage." What's the difference?

> I'll tell you the difference-- these are "dirty Mexicans" here.
> They're not clean-cut white folks who are nobly struggling through life in
> order to prove a point about art. They don't have a sub-genre of films
> dedicated to them that achieved some cult and even some mainstream
> success. They don't have an Albert Finney or Criterion DVDs or literary
> movements that warrant capitals ("Angry Young Men"). In short,
> Morrissey's heroes are cool because they're English-- they're white--
> while kids from roughly the same background here in L.A. are dirty, nasty,
> and beneath contempt-- because they're not white.

> That's disgusting. And your attitude is writ large on nearly every post
> you've made on this board.

> You might say that Morrissey would have reviled Mexicans back in '84.
> You're probably right. The Smiths-- as I have argued elsewhere-- are much
> bigger than Morrissey. Just because Morrissey was narrow-minded doesn't
> rule out the universal applicability of his ideas. Nor does it rule out
> self-contradiction. Whatever his inconsistencies, the concepts upon which
> The Smiths were founded, which he and Johnny talked about endlessly, are
> extraordinarily egalitarian. That his Mexican audience seems out of place
> listening to his records is a failure of imagination on your part-- I
> suspect Morrissey, although he was slow to do so, probably made the
> connection himself after awhile, which is why he caters to his Mexican
> audience now. Why can't you do the same?

> Right. Morrissey hated Americans. "Diseased orangutans is a bit
> extreme. I'm sure they're a couple of steps up from that." Which is
> why you consistently bring up the fact that you have ties to England,
> yeah? Which is why you mention that you knew Morrissey, that you'd gone
> shopping with him, yeah? If Morrissey is indeed shallow; if, as you seem
> to say, he accepted you even though you were American; then it seems to me
> that what you're saying is that-- miraculously!-- the limits of his
> affections extend only to you and no further. How convenient for you! And
> how arbitrary and ill-reasoned it makes your arguments look.

> Yes, it *was* about Mexicans. It was about anyone who was excluded and
> spat upon. It was for the downtrodden and the historically persecuted. How
> the hell could Morrissey worship an outsider-- a gay Irishman living in
> fin de seicle London for Christ's sake-- and not identify with outsiders
> of all races, genders, and types? Sure, the issue of Mexicans didn't come
> up-- why would they? Morrissey was stuck on a tiny little island in the
> North Sea. Once he got out and explored the world-- like any normal human
> being-- his vision was expanded and refined. You've traveled-- why haven't
> you done the same?

> I think you're being terribly naive about the ramifications of your
> arguments. What you're saying is that there is a certain type of fan-- The
> Smiths fan in the 1980s-- who should attend his concerts, and a certain
> type of fan-- people of other colors-- who shouldn't. Along the way, you
> throw in a copious amount of insulting racial epithets which make it very
> clear who you hate and why.

> Let me ask you-- why is it you stick the tag "Latino" or
> "Mexican" on nearly every description you use of, say, the
> people who attended the Hollywood Palladium gig (I was there too, by the
> way)? Sure, no one likes homophobes or whores, or chicks who don't know
> how to use make-up, but you never failed to add that they were Mexican.
> Why is that? Surely we all despise filth and degradation, so why shouldn't
> your handle be "Last Clean Fan"? Why isn't the primary theme of
> your posts personal hygeine, say, or morality?

> The answer is simple: you made it a case of white versus brown. You versus
> them. Older fans versus newer. This is why you are racist, despite the
> fact that you cling to that miserable rationalization "Morrissey is
> an elitist". There's no elitism in pop music. Period. It's impossible
> by definition. Morrissey knows that. The truth is, the number of human
> beings that Morrissey would find acceptable would barely fill a toll
> booth. He is a classic misanthrope. Oh, sure, he's forgiven-- after all,
> he hates humanity not because they're awful but because, damn it, he loves
> them so much they can only disappoint him. Fair enough, Moz.

> There's a paradox about being a Smiths fan that is very similar to
> Morrissey's being a Wilde fan. Morrissey wouldn't give us the time of day,
> and Wilde wouldn't give Morrissey the time of day (not even as rough
> trade). I'm not talking about politeness-- signing autographs-- I'm
> talking about really liking someone. Yet we love The Smiths, and Morrissey
> loves Wilde-- why is that? Simply because each strikes a bargain with
> those who love him. They love the worship, and we love worshipping them,
> and neither side is about to ruin the deal. Whatever Morrissey's private
> thoughts are about this new infusion of working-class fans, he exists as a
> public man, and therefore he cannot exclude them. Just as, whatever Wilde
> would have thought privately about a rail-thin moper from the grim North
> of England, he would gladly have shown enough politeness to ensure that
> Morrissey would fork over the dough for a ticket to "Earnest".

> Here we get to the crux of my argument, which I've made elsewhere but
> which I'll reprise again. Morrissey's private limitations do not translate
> to The Smiths, and, I feel, do not necessarily translate to the
> relationship he has with his fans. You know how I feel? He doesn't love
> us. He puts up with us. His personal history is littered with failed,
> broken relationships. He's a lonely, solitary man and in some twisted way
> he likes it like that. But he understands that pop music is for the
> masses, and The Smiths were all about the masses. To some degree his solo
> work is, as well, all though much less so. The bottom line is, there's no
> way a man can make pop records and be elitist *as a public figure*. I
> don't give a damn if you cornered Morrissey in Ralph's tomorrow and got
> him to admit, in a hushed whisper, that he secretly loathes Mexicans.
> That's neither here nor there. He makes the records, he does the tours, he
> welcomes his audience whether they're black, white, or brown. That's the
> truce he strikes with all those messy people who make his life possible.

> Now, all this speculation about Morrissey is just that-- speculation. But
> the issue you brought up is one of public importance: who, exactly, should
> comprise Morrissey's audience. The answer, obviously, is
> "everyone". That's what pop music is all about-- that's what the
> bargain entails.

> And yet this speculation can have a serious impact on the fans. And
> certainly it can have a tremendously negative impact on The Smiths, which,
> again, for the seven hundred and nineteenth time, were much bigger than
> just Morrissey. Morrissey may equal The Smiths, but The Smiths do not
> equal Morrissey. We don't have a relationship with the man (well, sorry,
> you do), we have something far more important. We have a relationship with
> the music. Therefore, it's outrageous to think that you, or I, or anyone
> should dictate what his audience should be like, or even bellyache about
> it on an Internet forum, as you've done. If I'm sensitive to all this,
> it's because I've had to deal with this kind of crap for well over fifteen
> years of being a Smiths apostle.

> The Smiths were (and still are) for everybody. They were possibly more
> accepting of all types of people than any other artist in history, right
> up there with all the bleeding hearts like John Lennon or Bono. Hell, they
> were probably more inclusive than the usual standardbearers of
> "unity" like Bob Marley. Fox In The Snow called Johnny's comment
> "banal"-- damn right! And beautifully so!

> No one can complain if you call out the racists, the homophobes, the thugs
> who come to the shows. Go ahead and lament the presence of those people in
> the audience. As I see it, maybe they're the people who *should* be going
> to these gigs, rather than a pack of mealy-mouthed suburban zombies who
> want to be mollycoddled and reassured that yes, thank God, they are, after
> all, very depressed and put-upon and isn't life a gas because of their
> heroic resistance to corporate tyranny. But don't make it a racial issue,
> and do not attempt to use an ill-conceived notion of The Smiths to back up
> your terrifyingly transparent bigotry.

> Elitism in pop music-- what a joke!

> That's true, but that's not the whole truth. Johnny has gone on record in
> the past-- I have it on VHS-- that he broke up The Smiths to preserve them
> intact. As he says it, "When we were on top, when we'd peaked, when
> we made the best record we were gonna make". Now, sure, that was
> partially spin control-- "I wasn't forced out of The Smiths, I left
> on my own". I do not think that was the sole reason. But it was one
> of the reasons, and a very important one.

> Whatever his reasons, the critical reputation a band enjoys is often
> greatly impacted by the sort of fans you run into on the street (or, these
> days, on the Internet). For example, most of us haven't heard much of the
> Grateful Dead's music (no complaints from me), but we feel we know what
> the band is all about from the sort of people who like them. So while we
> can't bring The Smiths back, we can certainly negatively affect their
> reputation with all this racist nonsense. Like I said, I wouldn't care if
> you, LWF, were an isolated case, but you're not. People like you have
> always made life difficult for the more reasonable, fair-minded-- and
> considerably larger portion-- of The Smiths' fan base.

> Considering how steadfast you are in your positions, LWF, I would make a
> genuinely sincere suggestion-- sit down and sort out what your attitude is
> toward Morrissey's Mexican audience. You seem to acknowledge that racism
> is bad. But it is apparent to those of us who have given a great deal of
> thought to this subject that you, unfortunately, are a racist. My advice
> is to decide whether you are or aren't, because all this dilly-dallying
> talk of "elitism, not racism" makes you appear confused rather
> than cogent.

> I'm not trying to tell you what to think. I'm not trying to be P.C.-- I
> loathe P.C. But, personally, I can't remain silent while you publicly
> slander something which is so much more than just a band to me.
> Interpreting The Smiths can be very difficult, but when you add up all the
> fragments they have a firm and wonderful consistency with all the highest,
> noblest, and most commonly held ideals of popular culture. If you can't
> see that, I recommend you check your math.
 
J

jimmy

Guest
Hey. All of you dildos need to stop with the idea that echo park/silverlake/los angeles in general is filled with mexicans/latinos. There are quite a few races littered throughout and we live around everyone just fine. Stop the white brown shit. Yeah there are all races there and I dont think anyone thinks that whites are so clean... and if they do they are wrong. All races are rich and poor as well as assholes and cool.

Its so funny how the white people are getting slammed in general when in fact all races have their intermingled issues with other races. Also is anyone white anymore? Shit half half the world is mixed beyond vision so who gives a f*** at this point. No one is at top. No one has power. There arent any secret commitees meeting on racial power, unless those people are in fact racist themselves.
 
T

The Last White Fan

Guest
Morrissey HATED the ruffian violent trash of the north
He invited all to better themselves.

I see the violent trash at the LA shows no different that the ones he hated from wigan.

Not all latinoids are trash at the shows just most of them
why morrissey accepts these people can only be for the $$$ they bring.

LWF

> Past Observer message is being reposted here WITH PERMISSION OF AN
> OBSERVER.

> This is Observer's answer to LWF... Observer talks about his view of
> Smiths legacy...

> //Repost Starts...
 
U

Unafraid of the Pupils

Guest
Last Race Post

Enough race wars in here. LW(trash)F is ignorant as far as demographic trends go: it's pontless to complain about latinos in the West Coast or in the Morrissey fanbase. They're already there. You sound like a betrayed wife who keeps bitching about the younger, more attractive woman you former husband dumped you for.
You also have no noticeable grasp of historical movements: your complaint is exactly the same made by the all waning, decadent classes upon the arrival of entrepreneurial migration waves. For every violent "mexican" who disturbs your delicate senses at the gigs, there are dozens who are good, honest, hard-working people helping the country they chose.
That's the third side of your ignorance: you should be thankful for the dual economic role of the latinos in the USA-- they pick up jobs americans no longer want, and their labour force helps to pay the social security demands of the rapidly aging american population.
The latino crowd opened Morrissey's eyes for the fact that he was british, allright, but before all he had irish descent, and he paid a social price for that in the UK just as latinos do these days in the US; I think Moz changed his views on race through a process of self-discovery triggere, among other things, by his spanish-speaking fans.
Wise up.
 
T

The Last White Fan

Guest
Re: Last Race Post

> The latino crowd opened Morrissey's eyes for the fact that he was british,
> allright, but before all he had irish descent, and he paid a social price
> for that in the UK just as latinos do these days in the US;

This Irish correlation is complete crap, I have heard this over and over
and nothing could be more untrue. Morrissey has never once in his life considered himself Irish, and never felt any social stigma from his Irish roots.

He has always felt completely northern, and did feel a sitgma from the south growing up. All his heros as a young man were nothern actors who kept their northern accents! Irish was never a factor, ever!

Morrissey was a champion of the northen kids who didnt want to be a typical lager dirnking football mindless rufian.

When morrissey moved to london in the mid 80s, a lot of his northen fans felt very betrayed, why their hero from the north would move to the south.

When he moved to LA most of his UK fans thought he was completely lost, and the UK press thought so too.

However IRISH roots were NEVER EVER a factor in anything with Morrissey growing up.

As for his latinoid fans, I am sure there are a lot of good ones, I grew up with hispanic smiths fans at my cathloic high school, but the majority of the hispanicans at the shows, are violent, bigoted, and homophobic.
Why do you feel so insecure about how you are that you have to protect these vile people???

LWF
 
A

Almodis

Guest
Re: Last Race Post

> This Irish correlation is complete crap, I have heard this over and over
> and nothing could be more untrue. Morrissey has never once in his life
> considered himself Irish, and never felt any social stigma from his Irish
> roots.

You keep repeating this LWF, but that doesn't make it true. From the November 1999 Irish Times interview (http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/features/1999/1120/fea9.htm)

"My Irishness was never something I hid or camouflaged. I grew up in a strong Irish community. Of course, early on I'd be teased about it, I was called `Paddy' from an early age. I mean, there I was, born, braised and bred in Manchester but I was still always called `Paddy'. And this was back in the 1960s when it was a bitter and malevolent slur. But that's how Manchester people are - they're extremely critical of everything and everybody."

Other famous Manchester-Irish sons and daughters such as Oasis and Caroline Ahearne, speak volubly and fondly about spending their childhood summers in the "old country", was this also his experience? "Oh yes. I used to come back to Dublin a lot when I was younger. We'd go back to Crumlin and of course I saw it with a child's vision, but the people seemed happier and more carefree and Crumlin seemed so open - certainly more so than the confines of Hulme. We were quite happy to ghettoise ourselves as the Irish community in Manchester, the Irish stuck rigidly together and there'd always be a relation living two doors down, around the back or up the passage. It always struck me as quite odd that people who had lived 20 or 30 years in Manchester still spoke with the broadest and the sharpest Pearse Street accent."

How steeped was he in that emigrant Irish culture, which is a strange one at the best of times? "It steeped into everything I knew growing up. I was very aware of being Irish and we were told that we were quite separate from the scruffy kids around us - we were different to them. In many ways, though, I think I had the best of both places and the best of both countries. I'm `one of us' on both sides. It was always odd later on with The Smiths when I was described as being `extremely English' because other people would tell me that I looked Irish, I sounded Irish and had other tell-tale signs. In fact, the new album - which I have finished writing but has yet to be recorded, is called Irish Blood, English Heart. It's funny, because U2 are always portrayed as being famously Irish and this is the great unsaid: aren't half the band English? All you have to do is hear The Smiths' surnames - Maher, Morrissey, Joyce and Rourke. It was only actually Andy Rourke's mother who was an English parent - all the other parents were Irish. It's an interesting story."
 
U

unafraid

Guest
Re: Last Race Post

> This Irish correlation is complete crap, I have heard this over and over
> and nothing could be more untrue. Morrissey has never once in his life
> considered himself Irish, and never felt any social stigma from his Irish
> roots.

Well, Almodis below has already brough up the interview I had in mind and helped educate you. You should also read carefully, for your own benefit, Rogan's "The Severed Alliance".
Just out of curiosity, other than acute mind-reading skills, what have you to support your view that Moz always felt "completely northern"?

> When morrissey moved to london in the mid 80s, a lot of his northen fans
> felt very betrayed, why their hero from the north would move to the south.

> When he moved to LA most of his UK fans thought he was completely lost,
> and the UK press thought so too.

So if he decides to join the Inuit near the North Pole you suppose his latino fans will feel betrayed as well?

> the majority
> of the hispanicans at the shows, are violent, bigoted, and homophobic.

(Sigh)

> Why do you feel so insecure about how you are that you have to protect
> these vile people???

They're not vile people and they're not the chosen people either: they're just regular people trying to improve in life and have fun.
 
S

Strangeways

Guest
Re: Last Race Post

I personally discussed this with him in '90 and he had a much different tune
Either he was trying to cover something up back then, and downplay it

or in recent years he is trying to expand his audence, because his northern fans left him.

Not the 1st time Morrissey has back-peddled.

I spoke with him about how retarded some Irish Americans where
Thumping their Irish pride and never had ever been to Ireland
nor understand their culture.

Morrissey said, that he always felt he was 100% Northern, and atoned with his area more than the blood in his veins. He said that he was never condisdered to be irish by anyone, because he had a very nothern accent and that was bad enough.

Why he changed his tune from '90 to '99 I have no clue.

By the fact it was the Irish press that reported this interview, it seems suspect.

-Emi

> You keep repeating this LWF, but that doesn't make it true. From the
> November 1999 Irish Times interview
> (http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/features/1999/1120/fea9.htm)

> "My Irishness was never something I hid or camouflaged. I grew up in
> a strong Irish community. Of course, early on I'd be teased about it, I
> was called `Paddy' from an early age. I mean, there I was, born, braised
> and bred in Manchester but I was still always called `Paddy'. And this was
> back in the 1960s when it was a bitter and malevolent slur. But that's how
> Manchester people are - they're extremely critical of everything and
> everybody."

> Other famous Manchester-Irish sons and daughters such as Oasis and
> Caroline Ahearne, speak volubly and fondly about spending their childhood
> summers in the "old country", was this also his experience?
> "Oh yes. I used to come back to Dublin a lot when I was younger. We'd
> go back to Crumlin and of course I saw it with a child's vision, but the
> people seemed happier and more carefree and Crumlin seemed so open -
> certainly more so than the confines of Hulme. We were quite happy to
> ghettoise ourselves as the Irish community in Manchester, the Irish stuck
> rigidly together and there'd always be a relation living two doors down,
> around the back or up the passage. It always struck me as quite odd that
> people who had lived 20 or 30 years in Manchester still spoke with the
> broadest and the sharpest Pearse Street accent."

> How steeped was he in that emigrant Irish culture, which is a strange one
> at the best of times? "It steeped into everything I knew growing up.
> I was very aware of being Irish and we were told that we were quite
> separate from the scruffy kids around us - we were different to them. In
> many ways, though, I think I had the best of both places and the best of
> both countries. I'm `one of us' on both sides. It was always odd later on
> with The Smiths when I was described as being `extremely English' because
> other people would tell me that I looked Irish, I sounded Irish and had
> other tell-tale signs. In fact, the new album - which I have finished
> writing but has yet to be recorded, is called Irish Blood, English Heart.
> It's funny, because U2 are always portrayed as being famously Irish and
> this is the great unsaid: aren't half the band English? All you have to do
> is hear The Smiths' surnames - Maher, Morrissey, Joyce and Rourke. It was
> only actually Andy Rourke's mother who was an English parent - all the
> other parents were Irish. It's an interesting story."
 
L

Last White Fan

Guest
Re: Last Race Post

> Well, Almodis below has already brough up the interview I had in mind and
> helped educate you. You should also read carefully, for your own benefit,
> Rogan's "The Severed Alliance".
> Just out of curiosity, other than acute mind-reading skills, what have you
> to support your view that Moz always felt "completely northern"?

Interviews and casual conversation when I have met in person during the smiths days til '91

> So if he decides to join the Inuit near the North Pole you suppose his
> latino fans will feel betrayed as well?

No but I would bet if there was a major development of Black fans
the hispanics would not just walk away as the white ones did
they would fight to stand their ground, and it would be a big bloody mess.
how sad is that?

LWF
 
F

Fox in the Snow

Guest
Johnny Rogan book "Morrissey & Marr: The Severed Alliance" sez: Moz Irishness is important!

> This Irish correlation is complete crap, I have heard this over and over
> and nothing could be more untrue. Morrissey has never once in his life
> considered himself Irish, and never felt any social stigma from his Irish
> roots.

> He has always felt completely northern, and did feel a sitgma from the
> south growing up. All his heros as a young man were nothern actors who
> kept their northern accents! Irish was never a factor, ever!

> Morrissey was a champion of the northen kids who didnt want to be a
> typical lager dirnking football mindless rufian.

> When morrissey moved to london in the mid 80s, a lot of his northen fans
> felt very betrayed, why their hero from the north would move to the south.

> When he moved to LA most of his UK fans thought he was completely lost,
> and the UK press thought so too.

> However IRISH roots were NEVER EVER a factor in anything with Morrissey
> growing up.

> As for his latinoid fans, I am sure there are a lot of good ones, I grew
> up with hispanic smiths fans at my cathloic high school, but the majority
> of the hispanicans at the shows, are violent, bigoted, and homophobic.
> Why do you feel so insecure about how you are that you have to protect
> these vile people???

> LWF
LWF! Please read Johnny Rogan book "Morrissey & Marr: The Severed Alliance". This book was hated by Moz, yet, common opinion among huge majority of Mozfans is, this book IS VERY CREDIBLE AND DEAD-ON ACCURATE in explaining both Old Mozza complex personality and his creative portfolio... According to Rogan, Moz Irishness, as well as Gayness, were 2 main factors of his life as an artist and citizen, so to speak... I don't have much time to discuss that wonderful book, I want to say that book is honest, Rogan is able to critisize Moz and Marr if necessarily, book is not sycophantic, but rather objective... At least IMHO.

LWF, hopefully this book would help to cure you of your ignorance and misconceptions about Smiths/Mozzer... Read it, could you read? :)

Ciao my white dah-ling... LOL (LOL is my trademark now, LOL)
 
S

Six String greasetea

Guest
SHUT THE f*** UP ALREADY!!! Nobody wants to hear it, TELL IT TO YOUR f***ED UP BOYFRIEND......f***!!

f***ed up because only a complete f*** up would do anything with you!

Kill yourself!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
U

underpaid teacher

Guest
Re: How many times can you include the F word in one post?

> X up because only a complete X up would do anything with you!
> Kill yourself!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Five ! -Out of twenty-nine words in all!
-And a threat too? Gtea, you've lost it!
 
T

The GlamGod

Guest
Re: Johnny Rogan book "Morrissey & Marr: The Severed Alliance" sez: Moz Irishness is important!

> LWF! Please read Johnny Rogan book "Morrissey & Marr: The Severed
> Alliance". This book was hated by Moz, yet, common opinion among huge
> majority of Mozfans is, this book IS VERY CREDIBLE AND DEAD-ON ACCURATE in
> explaining both Old Mozza complex personality and his creative
> portfolio... According to Rogan, Moz Irishness, as well as Gayness, were 2
> main factors of his life as an artist and citizen, so to speak... I don't
> have much time to discuss that wonderful book, I want to say that book is
> honest, Rogan is able to critisize Moz and Marr if necessarily, book is
> not sycophantic, but rather objective... At least IMHO.

> LWF, hopefully this book would help to cure you of your ignorance and
> misconceptions about Smiths/Mozzer... Read it, could you read? :)

> Ciao my white dah-ling... LOL (LOL is my trademark now, LOL)

It was subjectively offensive to both Moz and Marr. That's the problem with the objective honesty.

TGG
 
T

The GlamGod

Guest
Re: How many times can you include the F word in one post?

> Five ! -Out of twenty-nine words in all!
> -And a threat too? Gtea, you've lost it!

Did he ever have it? Ah what the f***. f***, f***, f***ity f***! That's all I can f***ing well say.

The GlamGod
 
Top Bottom