Punk!!!

Sister Rose

A little older, wiser
I love punk music, American and British. I mostly like the punk groups of 70's New York. Television, Patti Smith, Blondie and Talking Heads etc. Then again the British punk scene was awesome also with goups like The Sex Pistols, The Clash and Joy Division. Anyone else like Punk music? :guitar:
 

theneverplayedsymphony

The World's Forgotten Boy
Why, of course!:D New York and Detroit punk, mostly, but English punk very much so too! Proto-punk is great...
 

Musley

wild and free
God yes, punk was my era! I fully embraced it as a young girl. I had the spiky hair in different colours and all the clothes that went with it. Also living in a big city got the chance to see many bands, my favourite live band was The Damned, I saw them several times. Long live punk, without it where would we be now!
 

theneverplayedsymphony

The World's Forgotten Boy
God yes, punk was my era! I fully embraced it as a young girl. I had the spiky hair in different colours and all the clothes that went with it. Also living in a big city got the chance to see many bands, my favourite live band was The Damned, I saw them several times. Long live punk, without it where would we be now!

Ooh, I'd love to see the Damned! But they went a bit odd in the eighties. They're one of my favourites!:p Ever see the Vibrators?
 

tlm130

Born to hang
I love punk music, though I didn't listen to much coz the street I lived on was all into the Break dancing era! It was the early 80's and Electro - hip hop was blasting all over my street. I swear there was card board everywhere, I dug that music also but punk and rock music was more me... The Cramps, Buzzcocks, Dead Kennedys, even The Trashmen... C'mon anyone hear about the bird?
 

Musley

wild and free
Ooh, I'd love to see the Damned! But they went a bit odd in the eighties. They're one of my favourites!:p Ever see the Vibrators?

No I didn't. I saw a lot of punk bands but sadly never The Clash, who were my very favourite band till The Smiths appeared and my heart was stolen forever:D
 
Punk music is like my lifeblood really, and it's funny because I was just thinking of something yesterday... X is one of my favorite bands, and it's funny because after I moved to the UK, a lot of people over here that like punk don't even know who they are!!! I mean, yes the LA scene was like a completely different world to the NY scene, and the UK scene, but come on! I still mostly prefer the older sort of Oi and street punk stuff, but I love all the different twists and turns that punk sort of took in the earlier days. And, i am going to The Damned again in a few weeks too! Some of my fave bands though:

Damned
Ramones
Cock Sparrer
Cockney Rejects
The Misfits (w/ Danzig on vocals only)
Dead Kennedy's
Black Flag
X
Weirdo's
Catholic Discipline
Vibrators
Slits
Angelic Upstarts
4-Skins
The Business
Last Resort
Red Alert
The Adicts
The Stranglers
The Buzzcocks
Toy Dolls
X Ray Spex
Menace
Chelsea
Partisans
The Strike
Germs
Big Black
Fugazi
The Bags
DI
The Vandals (early stuff)
Adolescents
The Dickies
Bad Religion (Suffer era)
Television

I could go on forever!:D
 

nogodsnomasters85

Not Stirred
Punk rock is the soundtrack of my life. It is a beutiful and vibrant cultural movement and musical tradition whose impact simply cannot be understated. Some of my favs:
Sex Pistols, Clash, Adverts, Ramones, Blondie, Germs, X, Bad Religion, Dead Kennedys, Dropkick Murphys, Green Day, X-Ray Spex, Cock Sparrer, the Damned, Generation X, Buzzcocks, Subhumans, Vice Squad, Offspring, Nofx, the Muffs, Screeching Weasal, Anti-Flag, Operation Ivy, Rancid, the Distillers, the Queers, Social Distortion, Descendents, Public Image Ltd., Pinhead Gunpowder, Penetration, the Avengers... etc., etc.
 

nogodsnomasters85

Not Stirred
Punk music is like my lifeblood really, and it's funny because I was just thinking of something yesterday... X is one of my favorite bands, and it's funny because after I moved to the UK, a lot of people over here that like punk don't even know who they are!!! I mean, yes the LA scene was like a completely different world to the NY scene, and the UK scene, but come on! I still mostly prefer the older sort of Oi and street punk stuff, but I love all the different twists and turns that punk sort of took in the earlier days. And, i am going to The Damned again in a few weeks too! Some of my fave bands though:

Damned
Ramones
Cock Sparrer
Cockney Rejects
The Misfits (w/ Danzig on vocals only)
Dead Kennedy's
Black Flag
X
Weirdo's
Catholic Discipline
Vibrators
Slits
Angelic Upstarts
4-Skins
The Business
Last Resort
Red Alert
The Adicts
The Stranglers
The Buzzcocks
Toy Dolls
X Ray Spex
Menace
Chelsea
Partisans
The Strike
Germs
Big Black
Fugazi
The Bags
DI
The Vandals (early stuff)
Adolescents
The Dickies
Bad Religion (Suffer era)
Television

I could go on forever!:D

You have great taste! I totally agree, X are sooo underappreciated. I've seen them twice, fantastic both times. The double-disc anthology "Beyond and Back" is ESSENTIAL.
 

Smith Division

NY blood CHI heart
Awesome thread and great list NGNM..shit...I thought I was a lister. Punk changed it ALL!

Little known fact I read in a Joe Strummer biography: When The Clash were looking for a lead singer a young singer from Manchester applied for the position. I bet you can't guess who applied for that opening????????
 
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MunchyBrain

Born Against
Punk <3
The Smiths and Morrissey are kind of a random abnormality in my music taste, I mainly listen to punk.

Hüsker Dü
Crass
Radical Dance Faction
Dead Kennedys
Citizen Fish
Adolescents
Minutemen
Black Flag
Bad Religion
Conflict
Descendents
Oi Polloi
Mission Of Burma
Flux Of Pink Indians
Subhumans
Aus-Rotten
MDC

And then a lot of folk punk and obscure hardcore.
 

mozmal

Beastly Little Parasite
No I didn't. I saw a lot of punk bands but sadly never The Clash, who were my very favourite band till The Smiths appeared and my heart was stolen forever:D

I saw The Clash on October 10th, 1981 at the Bridlington Spa - you just had to be there. My only regrets were never seeing the Pistols and Buzzcocks. The punk years were incredible and I really wish something like this would happen again. For those of you who really love the music and the excitement of the punk days, you simply MUST read David Nolan's outstanding 'I Swear I Was There.'

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It's a fantastic book which focuses on the two infamous gigs the Sex Pistols played at the Lesser Free Trade Hall in 1976, and the impact they made on popular music in Manchester. The author tracked down audience members that really were there and interviewed almost everybody (except Morrissey.) Photos taken at the gigs are reproduced along with ticket stubs and posters. Buy it, you will not regret it.
 

nogodsnomasters85

Not Stirred
Awesome thread and great list NGNM..shit...I thought I was a lister. Punk changed it ALL!

Little known fact I read in a Joe Strummer biography: When The Clash were looking for a lead singer a young singer from Manchester applied for the position. I bet you can't guess who applied for that opening????????

Morrissey and Mick Jones were also both members of a New York Dolls fanclub.
 

nogodsnomasters85

Not Stirred
Punk <3
The Smiths and Morrissey are kind of a random abnormality in my music taste, I mainly listen to punk.

I think it fits perfectly. The Smiths might not BE punk, but they are punk-derived, like Joy Division, or Magazine. They're outgrowths of punk rock.

Hüsker Dü
Crass
Radical Dance Faction
Dead Kennedys
Citizen Fish
Adolescents
Minutemen
Black Flag
Bad Religion
Conflict
Descendents
Oi Polloi
Mission Of Burma
Flux Of Pink Indians
Subhumans
Aus-Rotten
MDC

And then a lot of folk punk and obscure hardcore.

An impressive list, little streetpunk-centric but all good bands. Although, I'd put MDC, Minutemen, and Husker Du in the hardcore file, only reason I didn't put Husker Du on my list. Although, admittedly, it's all early hardcore so it's very borderline.
 

MunchyBrain

Born Against
I think it fits perfectly. The Smiths might not BE punk, but they are punk-derived, like Joy Division, or Magazine. They're outgrowths of punk rock.



An impressive list, little streetpunk-centric but all good bands. Although, I'd put MDC, Minutemen, and Husker Du in the hardcore file, only reason I didn't put Husker Du on my list. Although, admittedly, it's all early hardcore so it's very borderline.

I think Joy Division and Magazine are more punk than The Smiths. The Smiths is a bit more poppy, but not in a bad way.

I was talking to someone about this the other day, but I actually count hardcore as a subgenre of punk, like anarcho (or as you call it, streetpunk :)). Husker Du I was most unsure of, even though I LOVE them, but just because some people count them in more with the whole alt. rock thing. Those people should hear the early stuff, hahah.
 

nogodsnomasters85

Not Stirred
I think Joy Division and Magazine are more punk than The Smiths. The Smiths is a bit more poppy, but not in a bad way.

They have a poppier sound, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything. I mean, look at Blondie, The Ramones, Generation X, Screeching Weasal, The Queers, Green Day maybe NOFX, but thats' a bit of a stretch. As punk is a movement, as opposed to a genre, the ethos has primacy over sound. You could do an a capella punk band, theoretically, although I wouldn't expect to sell any records. I think the Smiths were very punk in that they took on the monarchy matched in they're day only by the Sex Pistols, albiet much more subtle. The championing of homosexual;ity, inversion of gender roles, complete disavowal of the status quo, and militant vegetarianism were in they're way very punk.

I was talking to someone about this the other day, but I actually count hardcore as a subgenre of punk, like anarcho (or as you call it, streetpunk :)). Husker Du I was most unsure of, even though I LOVE them, but just because some people count them in more with the whole alt. rock thing. Those people should hear the early stuff, hahah.

Thats' how it began, originally it was hardcore punk, then they took that part off and shortened it to just "hardcore." Right now it's a totally seperate genre, and modern hardcore is pretty off-putting to me, not to mention most of the hardcore kids I know have a superiority complex anbd don't want to associate with punks. As for Husker Du I think the reason I like them so much is Bob Mould's biggest influence was Public Image, I think they're dissonant sound presaged Nirvana. Actually, streetpunk and anarcho-punk are two seperate, albiet highly similar traditions. The distinction is blurred further because they occured simultaneously. Street punk would be like Discharge, the Exploited, Mau Maus, etc. 80's punk that is carried on today, bands like Mark's band, the Unseen, the Casualties (Who I'm not that fond of musically, but I've seen them play a number of times.) , etc. Anarcho-punk, I know you're well familiar with Crass, Conflict, Chumbawamba, etc. It's a fine distinction, but an important one. Ian Glasper wrote two excellent books on the subject(s): "Burning Britain", and "The Day the Country Died: The History of Anarcho-Punk." Both are quite good and informative.
 

MunchyBrain

Born Against
They have a poppier sound, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything. I mean, look at Blondie, The Ramones, Generation X, Screeching Weasal, The Queers, Green Day maybe NOFX, but thats' a bit of a stretch. As punk is a movement, as opposed to a genre, the ethos has primacy over sound. You could do an a capella punk band, theoretically, although I wouldn't expect to sell any records. I think the Smiths were very punk in that they took on the monarchy matched in they're day only by the Sex Pistols, albiet much more subtle. The championing of homosexual;ity, inversion of gender roles, complete disavowal of the status quo, and militant vegetarianism were in they're way very punk.

I know, I just don't really consider them a punk band. Also, I don't want to get in an argument but I don't consider the Sex Pistols punk. :p



Thats' how it began, originally it was hardcore punk, then they took that part off and shortened it to just "hardcore." Right now it's a totally seperate genre, and modern hardcore is pretty off-putting to me, not to mention most of the hardcore kids I know have a superiority complex anbd don't want to associate with punks. As for Husker Du I think the reason I like them so much is Bob Mould's biggest influence was Public Image, I think they're dissonant sound presaged Nirvana. Actually, streetpunk and anarcho-punk are two seperate, albiet highly similar traditions. The distinction is blurred further because they occured simultaneously. Street punk would be like Discharge, the Exploited, Mau Maus, etc. 80's punk that is carried on today, bands like Mark's band, the Unseen, the Casualties (Who I'm not that fond of musically, but I've seen them play a number of times.) , etc. Anarcho-punk, I know you're well familiar with Crass, Conflict, Chumbawamba, etc. It's a fine distinction, but an important one. Ian Glasper wrote two excellent books on the subject(s): "Burning Britain", and "The Day the Country Died: The History of Anarcho-Punk." Both are quite good and informative.

There is a good modern hardcore scene, in the more punk/crust/d-beat scale of things, but the metalcore kind of hardcore that scene kids listen to is possibly the worst music known to man. :sick:

I agree that anarcho and street punk aren't the same, I was just making a generalisation because the two american punks I know thought they were the same, and seeing as classifications are pretty regional I assumed you thought the same. Sorry. I would, however say that Discharge are anarcho more than street.

Lol @ our punk subgenre fascism. :p

Also, I've come to the conclusion I don't like books about punk that much. There's a few really good ones (have you read American Hardcore?) but mainly I'm not that into them. I get my Crass/80s anarcho stories first hand. :)
 

nogodsnomasters85

Not Stirred
I know, I just don't really consider them a punk band. Also, I don't want to get in an argument but I don't consider the Sex Pistols punk. :p

It's impossible to make a statement like that without starting an argument. The Sex Pistols are, or at least were, the EPITOME of punk. They didn't create it, but they codified it much like Robert Johnson did with the delta blues, refining preexisting traditions and distilling them into what became the standard. The Sex Pistols in they're heyday are punk INCARNATE. Theres' no other way to see it. It has nothing to do with liking them or not, thats' just the truth. Moreover, regardless what they might say, Crass owe an ENORMOUS debt to the Sex Pistols, without them, they'd never have existed. You can say you hate the Sex Pistols, I don't care, but they were as punk as it gets. To suggest otherwise is ridiculous.

There is a good modern hardcore scene, in the more punk/crust/d-beat scale of things, but the metalcore kind of hardcore that scene kids listen to is possibly the worst music known to man. :sick:

I don't know anything about the english hardcore scene. But here they have a real elitist disdain for punk, and the music is awful. I DESPISE heavy metal with all my heart, and these fusion subgenres thrash, death metal, metalcore, are equally atrocious; horseshit, by any other name...

I agree that anarcho and street punk aren't the same, I was just making a generalization because the two american punks I know thought they were the same, and seeing as classifications are pretty regional I assumed you thought the same. Sorry. I would, however say that Discharge are anarcho more than street.

Lol @ our punk subgenre fascism. :p

I try to be as technical as possible. It may seem nitpicky, but I think it's important to distinguish. As for Discharge we could debate all day, in fact these particular subcategories are the most difficult to distinguish, that they exist, and that there is a differentiation is sufficient.

Also, I've come to the conclusion I don't like books about punk that much. There's a few really good ones (have you read American Hardcore?) but mainly I'm not that into them. I get my Crass/80s anarcho stories first hand. :)

I own American Hardcore but it's not a favorite. Steven Blush is clearly a hardcore aficionado and tars everything with that brush, lumping in the Circle Jerks, Dead Kennedys, the Germs, and the Misfits. The hardcore kids would love to put all the cool bands under they're tent, they can cry me a river because it just aint so. One should read all books with a filter, THAT one, especially. Too bad, you're missing out on some great stuff. My personal recommendations would start with "England's Dreaming:
Anarchy, the Sex Pistols, Punk Rock, and Beyond. The titl;e is somewhat misleading, while he devotes a large section of the book to the Pistols, he covers the whole punk rock movement from the New York Dolls to Nirvana, although he spends most of that on 70's britpunk. It contains a discography spanning decades and continents. THE book on punk rock. I would supplement that with "Please Kill Me: The History of New York Punk", and "We Got the Neutron Bomb: the History of LA Punk", although I preferred "Lexicon Devil: The Darby Crash Story", even if it was less broad. I'd follow that up with the well-written, but stupidly titled "My So-Called Punk" which covers modern punk, from the early eighties to today. John Lydon's "Rotten" is also good, there are a few great band biographies, I mentioned the Darby Crash one, I also liked "Heavier than Heaven: The Story of Kurt Cobain", "On The Road With the Ramones" written by Monte Melnick, they're manager, and "The Clash:Return of the Last Gang in Town". If you want to truly understand a thing, you have to do the research. The basic concept and principles of punk rock can be relayed pretty easily, but if you want to really understand the history of it theres' no other way.
 

MunchyBrain

Born Against
nogodsnomasters85 said:
It's impossible to make a statement like that without starting an argument. The Sex Pistols are, or at least were, the EPITOME of punk. They didn't create it, but they codified it much like Robert Johnson did with the delta blues, refining preexisting traditions and distilling them into what became the standard. The Sex Pistols in they're heyday are punk INCARNATE. Theres' no other way to see it. It has nothing to do with liking them or not, thats' just the truth. Moreover, regardless what they might say, Crass owe an ENORMOUS debt to the Sex Pistols, without them, they'd never have existed. You can say you hate the Sex Pistols, I don't care, but they were as punk as it gets. To suggest otherwise is ridiculous.

I like my punk politically correct (by my politics, obviously) and not on butter adverts. I don't consider it punk, it's pop.



nogodsnomasters85 said:
I don't know anything about the english hardcore scene. But here they have a real elitist disdain for punk, and the music is awful. I DESPISE heavy metal with all my heart, and these fusion subgenres thrash, death metal, metalcore, are equally atrocious; horseshit, by any other name....


It depends, because everything crosses over, but I like Aus-Rotten, Behind Enemy Lines, Antischism etc who undeniably incorporate metal and hardcore into the music. Creating crust-punk.



nogodsnomasters85 said:
I own American Hardcore but it's not a favorite. Steven Blush is clearly a hardcore aficionado and tars everything with that brush, lumping in the Circle Jerks, Dead Kennedys, the Germs, and the Misfits. The hardcore kids would love to put all the cool bands under they're tent, they can cry me a river because it just aint so. One should read all books with a filter, THAT one, especially. Too bad, you're missing out on some great stuff. My personal recommendations would start with "England's Dreaming:
Anarchy, the Sex Pistols, Punk Rock, and Beyond. The titl;e is somewhat misleading, while he devotes a large section of the book to the Pistols, he covers the whole punk rock movement from the New York Dolls to Nirvana, although he spends most of that on 70's britpunk. It contains a discography spanning decades and continents. THE book on punk rock. I would supplement that with "Please Kill Me: The History of New York Punk", and "We Got the Neutron Bomb: the History of LA Punk", although I preferred "Lexicon Devil: The Darby Crash Story", even if it was less broad. I'd follow that up with the well-written, but stupidly titled "My So-Called Punk" which covers modern punk, from the early eighties to today. John Lydon's "Rotten" is also good, there are a few great band biographies, I mentioned the Darby Crash one, I also liked "Heavier than Heaven: The Story of Kurt Cobain", "On The Road With the Ramones" written by Monte Melnick, they're manager, and "The Clash:Return of the Last Gang in Town". If you want to truly understand a thing, you have to do the research. The basic concept and principles of punk rock can be relayed pretty easily, but if you want to really understand the history of it theres' no other way.

Circle Jerks and Dead Kennedys were part of the hardcore scene, they played with hardcore bands, I don't think that is tarring anything, it's just fact. I think that punk is something that you can't understand by reading books. As I said, I get my stories about the punk scene first hand from people who were actually there.
 
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