Post Whatever You Are Thinking At This Very Moment

Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age

Surface

Chilling in Cheshire.
Great line-up. How can the Vapors still be touring, they had one song?!

I bought their first album New Clear Days, it was pretty good. They reformed a couple of years ago I think and they played at Rebellion in Blackpool last summer and were pretty good.

 

Redacted

Perfectly Satisfied
Another good line up for Cruel World.


That is really good. I am in a group about this and someone said weeks ago that most of these people are in the line up, esp Cure and Siouxsie and no one believed them. I guess they really did have an inside line to it, but it's even better than they said.
 

nicky wire's legs

all is vanity
Blazers are out, utility jackets are in
what a dumb ass thing to say. spoken like somebody who knows nothing about fashion, current or otherwise.

first off, it's like saying "cardigans are out, rainjackets are in." there's no comparison between the two. they have different concepts and different uses.

secondly, i dont know that either really ever go out. utility jackets might, because they're more prone to having "moments." at this point in fashion history, blazers do not have "moments." blazers are a fashion staple. they're here to stay.

thirdly, i think the mentality that things go "out of fashion" is now itself an "out of fashion" way of thinking about fashion. in this day and age of sustainable fashion, and buying quality not quantity, people are buying things with the idea of wearing them for years to come ( and for that, blazers, particularly high quality ones, are your best bet), rather than buying things with the thought of whether or not they are in or out. also, in this day and age of heigthened self-expression, more and more people are buying what suits them and what makes them happy and what conveys what they want to convey as opposed to being guided by what some know-nothing with an ugly personality on an internet forum pulls out of her ass.

fourthly, if you understand the reference points of fashion you can do away with the whole in/out thing. only people who know nothing about the references in fashion fall victim to what is or isnt trendy. for example, if i buy something because it has the reference point of 80's era berlin underground art culture, then that's why im buying it, not because it's in or not. and that reference point, that nod to history, doesnt change whether it's in or out, so it trumps whatever the current trend may be.

fifthly, i still have every intention of buying that r13 utility jacket (so long as it doesnt sell out before i can scrounge up the money). my only concern is that when im emaciated it might be too big for me, since r13 clothes tend to be oversized as is (which you would know if you had ever owned anything by r13 but i dont suppose you have).

sixthly, i think you should be banned for exhibiting creepy behaviour, and i do hope that's something the mods will look into in the future.
 
Last edited:

Aubrey McFate

Burn down the disco
Michael Stipe sat for a Q&A with the Guardian recently. I can see Harry Styles in the biopic. One thing I don't like about Stipe is that his politics have always been vanilla left. He's into Extinction Rebellion now. No bueno. They sit in the road, blocking traffic to draw attention to their cause. Nothing against the practice of infuriating the masses, but it just looks blah when your reason is, "we want insulation in every apartment," or "we want to end the use of fossil fuels." If your mission statement alone isn't enough to infuriate the masses, you probably ought to re-think.

Stipe's dinner party list is interesting. Gore Vidal and James Baldwin were both accused in their lifetimes of being anti-Semitic. But he doesn't seem to have invited any Jews for parity. He's a bit too white bread. I would have to choose between Isaac Bashevis Singer, David Cronenberg, Mia Kirshner, Woody Allen, Stanley Kubrick, Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, Marcel Proust, Emma Goldman, Franz Kafka, Vera Nabokov, Leonard Cohen, Uriel da Costa, Susanna Hoffs, Eva Frank, &c. Stipe's list:

Walt Whitman and James Baldwin. Claude Cahun and Janet Flanner. Nijinsky and Nureyev. Joan Didion. Martin Luther King Jr. Marlon Brando and Wally Cox. Nina Simone and Etta James. Thom Yorke and Benedict Cumberbatch. Nikola Tesla. RW Fassbinder and Patrice Chéreau. Gore Vidal and Liza Minnelli. Donald Glover and PJ Harvey. Barney Rosset and Jean Genet. Mike Nichols and Norman Lear. John Giorno and Brâncuşi. And a partridge in a pear tree.
 

Juan Dulces

I just see trees.
Michael Stipe sat for a Q&A with the Guardian recently. I can see Harry Styles in the biopic. One thing I don't like about Stipe is that his politics have always been vanilla left. He's into Extinction Rebellion now. No bueno. They sit in the road, blocking traffic to draw attention to their cause. Nothing against the practice of infuriating the masses, but it just looks blah when your reason is, "we want insulation in every apartment," or "we want to end the use of fossil fuels." If your mission statement alone isn't enough to infuriate the masses, you probably ought to re-think.

Stipe's dinner party list is interesting. Gore Vidal and James Baldwin were both accused in their lifetimes of being anti-Semitic. But he doesn't seem to have invited any Jews for parity. He's a bit too white bread. I would have to choose between Isaac Bashevis Singer, David Cronenberg, Mia Kirshner, Woody Allen, Stanley Kubrick, Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, Marcel Proust, Emma Goldman, Franz Kafka, Vera Nabokov, Leonard Cohen, Uriel da Costa, Susanna Hoffs, Eva Frank, &c. Stipe's list:

Thanks, that was informative, and I always appreciate your well thought out descriptions. He always was eccentric, and that doesn't ever go away really - it just expands. That being said, he has said some things as an older adult that have had people scratching their heads.

Michael S. is from the incredibly rural, very southern US. He is very in-touch with his own feelings, and is somewhat enlightened. However, he has always been very rural by nature, but not a 'redneck' - he's actually rather gentle, which made him an outsider growing up where he did.

From REM's 'The Wrong Child' - which fully expresses a somewhat lonely, rural American upbringing.

I've watched the children come and go
A late, long march into spring
I sit and watch those children
Jump in the tall grass
Leap the sprinkler
Walk in the ground
Bicycle clothespin spokes
The sound, the smell of swingset hands

You probably already have, but if you've never listened to their album 'Fables of the Reconstruction' you should. If you really listen to it, you'll grasp so much of how life was in the rural US south when Stipe was growing up.
 

Aubrey McFate

Burn down the disco
Thanks, that was informative, and I always appreciate your well thought out descriptions. He always was eccentric, and that doesn't ever go away really - it just expands. That being said, he has said some things as an older adult that have had people scratching their heads.

Michael S. is from the incredibly rural, very southern US. He is very in-touch with his own feelings, and is somewhat enlightened. However, he has always been very rural by nature, but not a 'redneck' - he's actually rather gentle, which made him an outsider growing up where he did.

From REM's 'The Wrong Child' - which fully expresses a somewhat lonely, rural American upbringing.

I've watched the children come and go
A late, long march into spring
I sit and watch those children
Jump in the tall grass
Leap the sprinkler
Walk in the ground
Bicycle clothespin spokes
The sound, the smell of swingset hands

You probably already have, but if you've never listened to their album 'Fables of the Reconstruction' you should. If you really listen to it, you'll grasp so much of how life was in the rural US south when Stipe was growing up.

I love Fables of the Reconstruction. It's my favorite of theirs. I grew up in the Northeast, but I've always had a deep fascination with the South. In the 80s, my family summered in North Carolina, and the best part of those two weeks every year was the rural, southern half of the drive. The reedy swamps, the dusty fields, the yellow pines, the junk dealers' roadside stands, the bungalow hovels, and the people who time plum forgot. You could go into a general store (a repurposed condemned building, essentially) and they'd have cassette bins and used book shelves full of the most interesting stuff an adolescent from New Jersey had never heard of. In a box somewhere, I might still have the Charley Pride cassette I bought aeons ago. (As you doubtless know, Stipe is reading the liner notes from a forgotten gospel record in Voice of Harold). "Forgotten" stuff was everywhere in sun-blasted eastern North Carolina. The R.E.M. trilogy from Murmur to Fables is very evocative of all that for me. The material that came after is still great, but it feels less esoteric and intimate. I remember learning the word "thaumaturgical" from a review of Stipe's lyrics & singing from that phase. And the videos are perfect: a melding of avant-garde photography and Southern decay.

I live in North Carolina now, and it's nothing like it was forty years ago. There are still nooks and crannies of the bygone culture, but in many respects it's as modernized and uninspiring as its country and gospel music scenes have become. Stipe, unfortunately, has suffered the same fate. He did wear a Sufi beard a couple years ago, but he hasn't been the eccentric he once was for a long time now. I don't think his eccentricity has expanded—if anything, it's contracted. R.E.M. became massive, and Stipe was able to very comfortably inhabit his fame. But the edges became smoothed down and the mystery went away. Wouldn't you agree his politics are boring? Even though Morrissey is now regrettably being taken up for praise by certain goonish pundits on the right, Stipe by contrast is just the generic sort of liberal of whom a Fox News blowhard would sneer, "shut up and sing." Morrissey is more complicated and interesting.
 
Last edited:

Surface

Chilling in Cheshire.
Well, you say that, but...this banger



Just been reading up on them and the guy playing lead guitar became a television director who directed episodes of Dr Who, Eastenders and other stuff and the singer is a lawyer for the Musicians Union.

I always liked this one - News at Ten, the other guitarist is the singers son.

 

Juan Dulces

I just see trees.
I love Fables of the Reconstruction. It's my favorite of theirs. I grew up in the Northeast, but I've always had a deep fascination with the South. In the 80s, my family summered in North Carolina, and the best part of those two weeks every year was the rural, southern half of the drive. The reedy swamps, the dusty fields, the yellow pines, the junk dealers' roadside stands, the bungalow hovels, and the people who time plum forgot. You could go into a general store (a repurposed condemned building, essentially) and they'd have cassette bins and used book shelves full of the most interesting stuff an adolescent from New Jersey had never heard of. In a box somewhere, I might still have the Charley Pride cassette I bought aeons ago. (As you doubtless know, Stipe is reading the liner notes from a forgotten gospel record in Voice of Harold). "Forgotten" stuff was everywhere in sun-blasted eastern North Carolina. The R.E.M. trilogy from Murmur to Fables is very evocative of all that for me. The material that came after is still great, but it feels less esoteric and intimate. I remember learning the word "thaumaturgical" from a review of Stipe's lyrics & singing from that phase. And the videos are perfect: a melding of avant-garde photography and Southern decay.

I live in North Carolina now, and it's nothing like it is was forty years ago. There are still nooks and crannies of the bygone culture, but in many respects it's as modernized and uninspiring as its country and gospel music scenes have become. Stipe, unfortunately, has suffered the same fate. He did wear a Sufi beard a couple years ago, but he hasn't been the eccentric he once was for a long time now. I don't think his eccentricity has expanded—if anything, it's contracted. R.E.M. became massive, and Stipe was able to very comfortably inhabit his fame. But the edges became smoothed down and the mystery went away. Wouldn't you agree his politics are boring? Even though Morrissey is now regrettably being taken up for praise by certain goonish pundits on the right, Stipe by contrast is just the generic sort of liberal of whom a Fox News blowhard would sneer, "shut up and sing." Morrissey is more complicated and interesting.

That was a wonderful story, and thank you for sharing that with me. I'm also from the Northeast, and feel the same way you do about those early REM albums, and just the mystery of the South in general. You've got a point as well in REM's material, after a certain year, not having the same intimacy about them. For me, it's when Bill Berry left the group (in like 1997 or close) that the music changed. He was basically like the father of American Alternative drumming - incredibly capable as a musician, and a very close friend to the other members, especially Mike Mills. You could hear 'the loss' in their future releases.

Yes, Stipe is much less interesting now (for one, where's he been?), and never was as interesting as Morrissey - you're completely right. It's a shame it seems that he's taking the 'celebrity-politics-bandwagon' route that so many others have gone down in our country, to my total dismay (because I keep kicking people off my 'love-list' most of the time when they fool around with that stuff). Like Stipe wrote - 'there's lots of room, for you, on the bandwagon'. These celebs are not political-scientists, and somebody like Michael S. really isn't a leader (which is fine), he's much more of a poet (also fine), and wants to be left alone (perfectly okay). He probably wouldn't be a good spokesperson in 2023, and should stay out of politics - it's not his arena. That being said, Stipe has been a tremendous contributor to American music, and I very much respect his musical work, as I'm sure you do just from what you wrote.

Maybe I'm saying too much, but I'm registered Independent, and avoid today's politics like the plague --- and I'm actually sorry that I can't engage with you on a political level, because I'm just not as informed and wouldn't want to waste your time or insult your intelligence, out of respect. But, I'm happy to answer any specific questions you have of me, even if they are political in nature, to the best of my abilities. However, I can't freely wax about politics (like I've seen that you are great at doing) as I've avoided having that background, and that's no offense.
 

Aubrey McFate

Burn down the disco
That was a wonderful story, and thank you for sharing that with me. I'm also from the Northeast, and feel the same way you do about those early REM albums, and just the mystery of the South in general. You've got a point as well in REM's material, after a certain year, not having the same intimacy about them. For me, it's when Bill Berry left the group (in like 1997 or close) that the music changed. He was basically like the father of American Alternative drumming - incredibly capable as a musician, and a very close friend to the other members, especially Mike Mills. You could hear 'the loss' in their future releases.

Yes, Stipe is much less interesting now (for one, where's he been?), and never was as interesting as Morrissey - you're completely right. It's a shame it seems that he's taking the 'celebrity-politics-bandwagon' route that so many others have gone down in our country, to my total dismay (because I keep kicking people off my 'love-list' most of the time when they fool around with that stuff). Like Stipe wrote - 'there's lots of room, for you, on the bandwagon'. These celebs are not political-scientists, and somebody like Michael S. really isn't a leader (which is fine), he's much more of a poet (also fine), and wants to be left alone (perfectly okay). He probably wouldn't be a good spokesperson in 2023, and should stay out of politics - it's not his arena. That being said, Stipe has been a tremendous contributor to American music, and I very much respect his musical work, as I'm sure you do just from what you wrote.

Maybe I'm saying too much, but I'm registered Independent, and avoid today's politics like the plague --- and I'm actually sorry that I can't engage with you on a political level, because I'm just not as informed and wouldn't want to waste your time or insult your intelligence, out of respect. But, I'm happy to answer any specific questions you have of me, even if they are political in nature, to the best of my abilities. However, I can't freely wax about politics (like I've seen that you are great at doing) as I've avoided having that background, and that's no offense.

It's nice to meet someone else drawn to the allure of Southern Gothic. I'm probably less political than I come across online. I'm registered Green, and the last vote I cast was for Ralph Nader in the 2000 election. I rate close to zero in terms of activism and so-called "civic duty." Yet I would probably score high on the opinionated scale. I have strong opinions, but I certainly don't do anything about them, aside from spouting off into the internet void. I'm "just another person in the world, a fool with radical views, who wants to turn it on its head by staying in bed."

I agree with what you said and how you phrased it: Stipe is a poet, not a political scientist. It's kind of interesting how Stipe, who professes political activism, is pretty blah when it comes to politics, while Morrissey, who claims to be apolitical, is a brilliant provocateur.
 

ThePoliticalRevolution

Well-Known Member
I just heard an elderly lady say she wanted to go somewhere where she'd never been before. I couldn't help thinking to myself that we're all eventually going to go there. And even in fairy stories in our infancy we prepare ourselves for that other place that's different to what we know now. Somewhere that might be magical but might also be inhabited by monsters. There's a 50/50 chance it good be a good place I suspect. I keep my fingers crossed. I often feel I need to travel and be somewhere else. Forebodings of death.

I think there's a tendency to think of death as either good or bad whereas really it might just be like life where there are some good things and bad things about it. There have been periods in my life where I'd rather have been dead. Terribly uncomfortable situations. People go on about 'brimstone and fire' but I've already encountered that. Surely death can't serve up anything as disturbing as what I've already gone through in life?
You seem really melodramatic!
 

ThePoliticalRevolution

Well-Known Member
I just heard an elderly lady say she wanted to go somewhere where she'd never been before. I couldn't help thinking to myself that we're all eventually going to go there. And even in fairy stories in our infancy we prepare ourselves for that other place that's different to what we know now. Somewhere that might be magical but might also be inhabited by monsters. There's a 50/50 chance it good be a good place I suspect. I keep my fingers crossed. I often feel I need to travel and be somewhere else. Forebodings of death.

it's possible this elderly lady is just bored. I consider myself to be an elderly lady, and I often fantasize about starting a cult after buying a mansion in Mexico City!
 
Tags
* no social life frink advice artie lange awesome bitching blush bored brooms candies chat cheese with your whine? college is tough companionship complaining epiphany episiotomy friendships funny happy i think u stink just lust moaning never to be replaced rabid monkey sad suck my teeth sweet caroline wowzers
Top Bottom