Painting and Drawing

Light Housework

Hunchback of Solow
Subscriber
More hair
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Light Housework

Hunchback of Solow
Subscriber
I'd thought the skin tone was too dark, but it turns out it's pale enough to represent my ghostly complexion. Of course I chose a flattering photo to go off, but this portrait looks recognizable as me. The mouth could be improved, by a pro. I'm not there yet.
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Light Housework

Hunchback of Solow
Subscriber
In an hour and a half I'm going to draw another self portrait from another selfie. In it, my right eye's bloodshot, and the genetic redness of eyelids is prominent. Not typically thought of as pretty. If anyone wants to send me a picture of themself to do a portrait from, my email is [email protected] .
 

Mozmar

Well-Known Member
In an hour and a half I'm going to draw another self portrait from another selfie. In it, my right eye's bloodshot, and the genetic redness of eyelids is prominent. Not typically thought of as pretty. If anyone wants to send me a picture of themself to do a portrait from, my email is [email protected] .
I dread to think of what sort of self pics you're going to receive...
 

Untruth

Active Member
If I was going to be picky, the shadow under the nose seems too dark. Sometimes shadow colors can be made by adding a little bit of dark blue to the color you're darkening. That brown you're using is also on the lips and the hair knot, but it seems like an extra color that's not part of that painting's palette, because it doesn't show up enough to feel like part of that world.
You might want to experiment using just white, black, and primary red, yellow and blue, and mixing your colors. It's a good way to see how colors are part of a collection and feel more natural together.
You don't have to stick with any limits but it's a good exercise. Don't do it on a real painting but practice painting a still life with an apple and a banana or something like that and mix your colors.
 

Light Housework

Hunchback of Solow
Subscriber
If I was going to be picky, the shadow under the nose seems too dark. Sometimes shadow colors can be made by adding a little bit of dark blue to the color you're darkening. That brown you're using is also on the lips and the hair knot, but it seems like an extra color that's not part of that painting's palette, because it doesn't show up enough to feel like part of that world.
You might want to experiment using just white, black, and primary red, yellow and blue, and mixing your colors. It's a good way to see how colors are part of a collection and feel more natural together.
You don't have to stick with any limits but it's a good exercise. Don't do it on a real painting but practice painting a still life with an apple and a banana or something like that and mix your colors.
I did someone's portrait in acrylics decades ago, and the muse overtook me, and I was magically able to mix my own colors out of the primaries. I did aagreat great portrait of him. Then he pretty much left me for another woman, and I was so butthurt I never had that muse again. I don't know if I feel up to mixing.
 
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