"Open Letter to the LA Times re Morrissey" - For Britain

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by davidt, Oct 31, 2019.

By davidt on Oct 31, 2019 at 4:36 AM
  1. davidt

    davidt Administrator Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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Comments

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by davidt, Oct 31, 2019.

    1. Nerak
      Nerak
      Khadija speaking about Islam as an ideology - so why the white nationalism in the letter? Truly the worst political party in the country. They have no idea who they are or how to sell themselves.



      I googled her to see if she existed.
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    2. PuppetParrot
      PuppetParrot
      Skinny you were answering one of your other Skinny posts a few posts ago.
      Skinny doing good cop-bad cop.
    3. PuppetParrot
      PuppetParrot
      You are thinking of your Benny Butcher username.
    4. Nerak
      Nerak
      I can only dream of knowing how to post emojis.
    5. Nerak
      Nerak
      as ever with Morrissey, if you look deeper, the jury is out. Nothing about him is ever normal.
    6. vegan cro spirit 555
      vegan cro spirit 555
      :rolleyes:

      :straightface:

      he is pretty normal in the sense he doesnt wear a wig helmet with a patch:handpointright::guardsman::handpointleft:
      and filled his self with tattoos at 5o yrs old. He doesnt wear flowery shorts buttoned up
      to his neck and thumb so nobody can see them. Now thats not normal:thumbsdown:
      getting dozen tattoos and then wanting nobody to see them by wearing stretched out flowery shirts all the time.:bowing:
    7. ForgotHowIGotMyName
      ForgotHowIGotMyName
      Oh, hey. We've got ourselves an armchair Freud.

      Bulverism

      Bulverism is a logical fallacy. The method of Bulverism is to "assume that your opponent is wrong, and explain his error." The Bulverist assumes a speaker's argument is invalid or false and then explains why the speaker came to make that mistake, attacking the speaker or the speaker's motive. The term Bulverism was coined by C. S. Lewis to poke fun at a very serious error in thinking that, he alleges, recurs often in a variety of religious, political, and philosophical debates.
      Similar to Antony Flew's "subject/motive shift", Bulverism is a fallacy of irrelevance. One accuses an argument of being wrong on the basis of the arguer's identity or motive, but these are strictly speaking irrelevant to the argument's validity or truth.



      Source of the concept
      Lewis wrote about this in a 1941 essay which was later expanded and published in The Socratic Digest under the title "Bulverism". This was reprinted both in Undeceptions and the more recent anthology God in the Dock. He explains the origin of this term:

      You must show that a man is wrong before you start explaining why he is wrong. The modern method is to assume without discussion that he is wrong and then distract his attention from this (the only real issue) by busily explaining how he became so silly.

      In the course of the last fifteen years I have found this vice so common that I have had to invent a name for it. I call it "Bulverism". Some day I am going to write the biography of its imaginary inventor, Ezekiel Bulver, whose destiny was determined at the age of five when he heard his mother say to his father—who had been maintaining that two sides of a triangle were together greater than a third—"Oh you say that because you are a man." "At that moment", E. Bulver assures us, "there flashed across my opening mind the great truth that refutation is no necessary part of argument. Assume that your opponent is wrong, and explain his error, and the world will be at your feet. Attempt to prove that he is wrong or (worse still) try to find out whether he is wrong or right, and the national dynamism of our age will thrust you to the wall." That is how Bulver became one of the makers of the Twentieth Century.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulverism
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    8. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Typical. Add the 'straw man fallacy' too.
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    9. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Nice!
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    10. Nerak
      Nerak
      I wasn't arguing that Reel's argument was wrong because of their psychology, I was arguing that it was wrong & that they may be attracted to that wrong argument because of psychology.
      Last edited: Nov 5, 2019
    11. Anonymous
      Anonymous
      'Straw man' argument from the get-go.
    12. Gordon
      Gordon
      It does rather prove their point about Silicon Valley not allowing them to defend their views.

      BTW Shortly after it was formed I met a British Pakistani woman who was in For Britain (not the author). Another former muslim. Also a British Pakistani Farage-era UKIP candidate who was beaten up while campaigning

      Morrissey has taken a very anti-establishment (and anti-music establishment, and anti-commercial) line in Backing Anne Marie Waters, though she ticks all his boxes. Would people really prefer their rebels to be the ones invited onto the BBC as the "voice of the yoot", lauded by the guardian and NME, and handed biz awards where they can shock the world with what they have been told to say (looking at you, Stormzy)


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