NME Review Low In High school by Jordan Bassett (2/5)

Ugly Devil

Well-Known Member
http://www.nme.com/reviews/album/morrissey-low-in-high-school-review
Moz’s strange 11th solo album starts off well enough, but soon goes seriously wrong

There’s no easy way to tell you this, but Morrissey is fixated with the bit between your legs. His 11th solo album is chockablock with crotch. On ‘Home Is A Question Mark’, he implores you to “wrap your legs around my face” and on ‘In Your Lap’ he delivers the grim news that “I just want my face in your lap”. You should also feel some trepidation when you hit ‘play’ on ‘When You Open Your Legs’.

If the tracks on ‘Low In High School’ aren’t crotch songs, they’re anti-war songs. There are, categorically, no anti-crotch songs. On ‘I Bury The Living’ he bellows, “Gimme an order! I’ll blow up a border! Gimme an order! I’ll blow up your… daughter!” It’s no ‘Shipbuilding’, but it does drive the point home.
Lead single ‘Spent The Day In Bed’ skitters across melancholia with a lilting refrain, while the lyrics – about the joys of ducking your responsibilities – sound as though they’re lifted from a ’70s novelty song. Yet ‘Jacky’s Only Happy When She’s Up On The Stage’ is the real standout; a tale of an actor whose ambitions far outweigh her talent, it’s brooding goth-pop laced with venom. In fact, the 12-song album’s first five tracks are passable, if not actually quite enjoyable. Beyond this point, though, only the most hardened Moz fan should dare to venture.

‘The Girl From Tel Aviv Who Wouldn’t Kneel’ is an unbearable cha-cha-cha; ‘Who Will Protect Us From The Police?’ is lumpen electro; and least listenable track ‘Israel’ sees him deliver political polemic via the dubious medium of a piano ballad. Moz has become pop’s greatest troll in recent years, and here he’s exhaustive in goading you to hit the ‘off’ button. It’s enough to make you put your head in your hands. Or, indeed, your lap


Read more at http://www.nme.com/reviews/album/morrissey-low-in-high-school-review#3M70WkWg6GYrhk28.99
 

Famous when dead

Vulgarian
Moderator
Well, there's an utterly amazing piece of journalism. It reads exactly as a carbon copy of a couple of already printed reviews - even down to the lyric choices to print - is there nothing about the unheard songs they can manage to quote in more detail - my how reviews have changed.
NME makes me feel old - I don't recognise half the bands in it these days (and have no desire to).
It all comes across as slipshod whether you agree with the review or not.
Oh for Record Mirror & Sounds again.
Sigh,
FWD.
 

!Viva Hate!

Well-Known Member
Well, there's an utterly amazing piece of journalism. It reads exactly as a carbon copy of a couple of already printed reviews - even down to the lyric choices to print - is there nothing about the unheard songs they can manage to quote in more detail - my how reviews have changed.
NME makes me feel old - I don't recognise half the bands in it these days (and have no desire to).
It all comes across as slipshod whether you agree with the review or not.
Oh for Record Mirror & Sounds again.
Sigh,
FWD.

My assumption for this is that they haven't actually heard the album...they just want to produce content that is a thin framework to stuff all their bitching about Morrissey not being as liberal as they are into. I mean, that's all any of these articles boil down to...
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
NME is owned by the same people that own Uncut so it's probably not a co-incidence that they both gave the worst reviews across the entire music media.
We clearly don't have a great album on our hands, and I'm dreading all the 'lap' songs but it sounds like there are 4 or 5 good to great ones. Their lyrical criticism of Spent the Day is bonkers but their other criticisms may be fair enough.
 
E

Eldritch

Guest
So far The Girl In Tel Aviv... has been labelled by different reviewers as bossa nova, chanson, cha cha cha, a tango and a waltz.
 

Tbevie

Girl afraid
So far The Girl In Tel Aviv... has been labelled by different reviewers as bossa nova, chanson, cha cha cha, a tango and a waltz.
When I've heard the album I'm going to go back and re-read some of these reviews. And I bet some of them still won't make sense.
 

Orson Swells

Well-Known Member
So, Spent the Day In Bed is about "the joys of ducking your responsibilities"? It sounds like it was reviewed by Theresa May.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
So, Spent the Day In Bed is about "the joys of ducking your responsibilities"? It sounds like it was reviewed by Theresa May.

That really made me laugh. I mean the reach they would go to in order to criticize the song is so so ironic. the nme is now chiding a song because it’s encouraging the shirking of adult responsibilities for a day. This should be the nme’s new theme song from here on out

 

NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH #FBPB
No mention of I wish you lonely or young people. I like those.
 

NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH #FBPB
I’m asked to leave this club in Tel Aviv...
 

Ugly Devil

Well-Known Member
This smug looking millennial toerag reviewer has the most punchable set of chops I've seen of late. I can feel vomit rising up my throat when these muso journo twats attempt to turn a review into a comedy side piece, so they can showcase their shitty humour.
IMG_20171115_142234.jpg
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Indeed, Millennials are styleless, group-thinking middle management tits, but this album is shaping up to be a bridge too far. So much trolling in evidence lyrically. Will a torch song offering a lyrical ode to cophraglia be next? I'm not sure there will be a next.
 

Vegan

Well-Known Member
Only one review counts, your own.

Agreed. Reading other people's opinions is good fun but I honestly could not care less, especially when a review is so bloody subjective as so many have been for this album. To be honest the only way I would boycott a Moz album is if he sang a pro-Trump song. :cool:
 
Top Bottom