M's voice on Southpaw Grammar?

DrStatham

Active Member
Hi,
I have often thought that M's voice on Southpaw Grammar sounded a bit ... off. Almost as if he had a bad throat or had recently suffered from a bad cold or something. I have heard the odd muttering that he did in fact have flu soon before recording but I cannot find a single source.
So does anybody know anything about his voice at that time? Or is it all just in my head?
 

Kewpie

Member
Moderator
Subscriber
It's well documented in Mozipedia and that Morrissey was unwell when the recording was taken place.

I'll add Steve Lilywhite interview link later.
 

DrStatham

Active Member
It's well documented in Mozipedia and that Morrissey was unwell when the recording was taken place.

I'll add Steve Lilywhite interview link later.
Thanks for the reply, I'll have to grab Mozipedia and see what I missed! And I'd appreciate the interview link, thanks!
 

DrStatham

Active Member
If anyone else did not know about this then, here is the Mozipedia extract:

'That Morrissey's voice wasn't at its finest during the recording may have had some bearing on its use of long, vocal-free interludes. Many tracks suffer from an audibly 'blocked' delivery, as Danton Supple elaborates. 'One of the constant problems with Morrissey was that he often got colds. I used to think it might be something to do with his diet. It's very dairy laden, everything was egg and milk based which can play havoc with people's sinuses and breathing and he used to get bunged up a lot. You can hear it on a couple of tracks on Southpaw, where his voice is quite stuffy. Even Morrissey would later recount accidentally overhearing Lillywhite and Supple criticise his performance on 'The Teachers Are Afraid Of The Pupils' at the time.'
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I always just thought it was the period in which his range and register were naturally changing. He never quite sang or sounded the same after Vauxhall. It was better on maladjusted and was great almost better than ever by quarry but by then his vocal style had changed and he sang at a lower pitch which seemed to make his voice resonate so much more. I wondered if he priced the change and strain and consciously worked at readjusting his approach during the hiatus years
 

The Truth

about Ruth
Hi,
I have often thought that M's voice on Southpaw Grammar sounded a bit ... off. Almost as if he had a bad throat or had recently suffered from a bad cold or something. I have heard the odd muttering that he did in fact have flu soon before recording but I cannot find a single source.
So does anybody know anything about his voice at that time? Or is it all just in my head?
When he was a teenage boy something got stuck in his throat.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
If anyone else did not know about this then, here is the Mozipedia extract:

'That Morrissey's voice wasn't at its finest during the recording may have had some bearing on its use of long, vocal-free interludes. Many tracks suffer from an audibly 'blocked' delivery, as Danton Supple elaborates. 'One of the constant problems with Morrissey was that he often got colds. I used to think it might be something to do with his diet. It's very dairy laden, everything was egg and milk based which can play havoc with people's sinuses and breathing and he used to get bunged up a lot. You can hear it on a couple of tracks on Southpaw, where his voice is quite stuffy. Even Morrissey would later recount accidentally overhearing Lillywhite and Supple criticise his performance on 'The Teachers Are Afraid Of The Pupils' at the time.'
Ah, SG was recorded before M. discovered pasta!
That must explain it.
 

gordyboy9

GAME OF DEATH.
so dairy can now change the sound of your voice,and here was me for the last 24 years thinking he had a heavy cold.
 

DrStatham

Active Member
so dairy can now change the sound of your voice,and here was me for the last 24 years thinking he had a heavy cold.
Have we considered the fact he may have been snorting the dairy rather than eating it? I reckon that'd definitely block you up.
 
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