Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TTY

Margaret Thatcher - true-to-you.net
9 April 2013

The difficulty with giving a comment on Margaret Thatcher's death to the British tabloids is that, no matter how calmly and measuredly you speak, the comment must be reported as an "outburst" or an "explosive attack" if your view is not pro-establishment. If you reference "the Malvinas", it will be switched to "the Falklands", and your "Thatcher" will be softened to a "Maggie." This is generally how things are structured in a non-democratic society. Thatcher's name must be protected not because of all the wrong that she had done, but because the people around her allowed her to do it, and therefore any criticism of Thatcher throws a dangerously absurd light on the entire machinery of British politics. Thatcher was not a strong or formidable leader. She simply did not give a shit about people, and this coarseness has been neatly transformed into bravery by the British press who are attempting to re-write history in order to protect patriotism. As a result, any opposing view is stifled or ridiculed, whereas we must all endure the obligatory praise for Thatcher from David Cameron without any suggestion from the BBC that his praise just might be an outburst of pro-Thatcher extremism from someone whose praise might possibly protect his own current interests. The fact that Thatcher ignited the British public into street-riots, violent demonstrations and a social disorder previously unseen in British history is completely ignored by David Cameron in 2013. In truth, of course, no British politician has ever been more despised by the British people than Margaret Thatcher. Thatcher's funeral on Wednesday will be heavily policed for fear that the British tax-payer will want to finally express their view of Thatcher. They are certain to be tear-gassed out of sight by the police.

United Kingdom? Syria? China? What's the difference?

Morrissey
9 April 2013



Related items:

 
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Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

An Evil Dictator

Errr... she won three elections.

She was all for those wanting to be in control and taking advantage of the less well-off and would make sure that her supporters were heard while those who opposed her were silenced.

Really? Orgreave? The Poll Tax riots? Hundreds of other demos? All those songs? All the satire and hatred aimed at her across the media from the first day until the last and beyond? Silenced? More ludicrous hyperbole.

She was someone who was a self-appointed control freak

Three elections. One. Two. Three.
 

Peterb

Well-Known Member
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

Errr... she won three elections.



Really? Orgreave? The Poll Tax riots? Hundreds of other demos? All those songs? All the satire and hatred aimed at her across the media from the first day until the last and beyond? Silenced? More ludicrous hyperbole.



Three elections. One. Two. Three.
Hi Johnny, you certainly appear to be fan of Thatch. It's noticable that a lot of those coming out to praise her did not live under her Premiership. Is this the case with you?
This is not to disparage you or your position. I take a different stance. So what?
RJ's comments, whilst I support their spirit are wide of the mark and your are sharp enough to pick away at them.
 

Rowntree

New Member
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

Hi Johnny, you certainly appear to be fan of Thatch. It's noticable that a lot of those coming out to praise her did not live under her Premiership. Is this the case with you?
This is not to disparage you or your position. I take a different stance. So what?
RJ's comments, whilst I support their spirit are wide of the mark and your are sharp enough to pick away at them.

I've seen a lot of online sycophancy over her and all without question turned out to be young kids at best when she was PM. Even her most ardent supporters who are older accept she made mistakes in believing in things like the trickle down effect - obviously not in the media as her fans are trying to secure her legacy. I think not being around makes you take a lot of propaganda at face value and you lose the prospective of quite how grim it could be in the 80's. You could easily get the impression that the 80's were all glamour and easy street just because Thatcher gave Scargill what for and because the 70's were shit. In reality it was a decade of very low wages, recession and high unemployment if you weren't one of the lucky people her policies allowed to make a fast buck. All this and she never got voted in by a popular majority.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

Everyone has an opinion on Margaret Thatcher. Like Marmite, you either loved her or hated her. BUT SO mant people actually respected her, especially women! She was a STRONG person
If the mines were not profit making.................. why keep them open? Poll Tax????????????? someone has to pay!!!! I Loved Maggie.... I HATE CAmeron..........so it is not a political thing.
Mr Morrissey............................. We are the same age........................your frame of reference was influenced by where and what you were at the time...... GROW UP!
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

I'm not convinced Scargill is a separate issue, BB. I think it is cause and effect. I think the far left are more responsible for her rise and what followed, including Blair, than they are comfortable admitting.

The average person in the street is not of either the extreme left or right. They hover at the centre and tip across that median point depending on the prevailing state of the nation at election times.

Every time the lights went out, every time another wildcat strike was called, every time Hatton or Scargill ranted, every time Galloway shook hands with another Arab despot, every time the fascist left flexed its "mighty" muscles they drove people away from Labour. That same situation is reflected today every time a woman is raped by a senior SWP members (nine times and counting) and it is dealt with by a committee of the bastard's mates and they are deemed innocent without recourse to the bourgeois police and judiciary.

Even Kinnock knew it when he expelled Militant at the Labour conference in 1985. That whole speech was impressive, but because of Militant is only remembered for a single paragraph. "I’ll tell you what happens with impossible promises. You start with far-fetched resolutions. They are then pickled into a rigid dogma, a code, and you go through the years sticking to that, out-dated, mis-placed, irrelevant to the real needs, and you end up in the grotesque chaos of a Labour council hiring taxis to scuttle round a city handing out redundancy notices to its own workers." Kinnock knew that if Militant infiltrated the national executive Labour would be finished as a mainstream party and his hand was forced. In doing so he left his only legacy.

The electorate decided they had to be dealt with too, and elected Thatcher three times, and her bastard child Tony Blair three times too, firstly to deal with that threat, and then to cement it. Only the hubris of Blair over Iraq has given the extreme left a hook to hang its hat on once more. We were without its pernicious effect on the day to day running of this country for much of the last generation and very nice it was too.

Now, I agree regarding Hillsborough. Disgusting, and not just the Thatcher government, but subsequent ones too.

As for Orgreave, like the IRA hunger strikes, what you are saying in effect is it was her fault for not giving into blackmail. As she was the leader of the democratically elected government what else could she do? Allow communists to dictate policy? Allow Sands and his terrorists their demands? Of course not.

Famously her immediate Tory predecessor Heath when faced with a similar situation with the NUM went to the country to ask them who is in charge of the country. Unsurprisingly, the public view was that if the Prime Minister had to ask it obviously wasn't him, and rightly threw him out. Simply put, the public didn't want the National Union of Mineworkers running the country, and it was that, and the strength and similar behaviour of other unions that laid the way for Thatcher.

agree with some of this, especially about Scargill: they were co-dependent and needed each other as 'enemy within' at the expense of the county. But she was a coward. American invaded Grenada against her will. If she'd have had the courage of her convictions she'd have sent gunships to Boston. She didn't because she was a bully. And America was powerful enough for her to fear. So much for her 'special relationship with Reagan, that's just nonsense. The truth of Orgreave will shake this c***ry to the core. She was a crypto-fascist. Ted Heath cottaging on Hampstead Heath till MI5 had to talk to him. Jeremy Thorpe. Savile. 70s Britain, eh?
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

I think I've made it pretty clear it is the far left in general. It is equally true you seem happy to overlook their many, many faults too.

There is no war on the poor, there is war on the lazy f***ers who suck from the public teat when they could get work. Unfortunately the innocent get caught in the crossfire. The government want to get the crooks and fraudsters off the public payroll, as do a majority of the public. Now, if you want to argue that they're going around it in any governments usual clodhopping one-size-fits-all fashion, I'd agree with you, but the basic desire is sound.

The banksters are sucking from the public teat as the City of London has done for hundreds of years. And yes, we need to declare war on them, these 'Scargills In Pinstripes' as Vince Cable called them before he lost his spine, and had his balls cut off. regards. BB
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

This is related to the previous statement but it just doesn't sit well with me the way Morrissey and it seems Russell Brand sympathise with the IRA. It's not in line with the majority of peace loving people in Ireland today and their sympathy with the families of victims. Some families have been denied the right to mourn loved ones whose bodies to this day are yet to be recovered. I don't sympathise with loyalist terrorists either. It's disgraceful.

they sympathise with Sinn Fein who are a legitimate political party with legally compliant goals, whether or not you agree with them. The IRA no longer exists, other than as a small rump, who are very dangerous and may try to launch an attack on Thatcher's funeral, according to MI5. The families of those who sank with the Belgrano have ' denied the right to mourn loved ones whose bodies to this day are yet to be recovered.' I don't sympathise with any terrorists. full stop. coming from Brum and having witnessed the events of November 21 1974, I'd be totally delusional if I did. The IRA had no right to bomb Birmingham or Brighton. Thatcher they deemed a legitimate target so a rifle should have been used. Norman Tebbit's wife and others were absolutely not legitimate targets, neither were the 21 who perished in Birmingham:

http://justice4the21.blogspot.co.uk/

Thatcher's intransigence publicly towards the IRA now has to be balanced with the revelation that she was negotiating all along. Ridiculous posturing, the Good Friday Agreement could have happened much earlier if she hadn't been such a head-the-ball:

"Thatcher negotiated with the IRA"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-16366413

The demands of Bobby Sands were hardly unreasonable, yet she chose to take it to the limit. Ridiculous woman.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Sands#Hunger_strike
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: From the Horse's mouth - TTY - Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the p

I didn't say you cared what they thought. I said you were wrong -- which still stands.

No, I'm not wrong. New York and the New Yorker are wrong. And so are you. It stands only in your rather unimportant opinion, as there are so many 'anonymous' opinions. As my New York friends say to me, "opinions are like assholes, everyone's got one". Guess what, you're an asshole.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

An Evil Dictator

Maggie Thatcher’s policies and ideas resulted in many unfortunate people staying on low pay and being exploited for cheap labour so that ones like her could get richer quicker.

She was all for those wanting to be in control and taking advantage of the less well-off and would make sure that her supporters were heard while those who opposed her were silenced.

She was someone who was a self-appointed control freak who had to have special privileges over everyone else so that what she said had to be seen to be obeyed and she had the last say.

She was protected and wrapped in cotton wool so she could do what she wanted and destroy the lives of many unfortunate people and nobody else could do anything about it.

It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than it is for someone like Thatcher to enter the Kingdom of Heaven; so will she try to privatise Hell now?

that's really good!
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

checking inbox obsessively for link.

watched the video.
interesting.
i'm into the exploration of sonic manipulations of objects of varying material and their resonating frequencies.
frequencies, in general fascinate me endlessly.
music is energy. vibration. it has the ability to effect the vibrations of our own energy so dramatically.
i think to fail to explore it in the scientific, socio-political, and artistic realms, (both high and low, whatever that would even mean anymore...) would be to fail as the creators of something far more significant, to all life forms, than we, as it's creators, even possess the ability to comprehend.
art school. hahaha!
at least i was on scholarship.
nobody wasted any money on it.
it hasn't failed me, though.
i manage a painter of world class caliber and live with a music and theatrical producer....my past incarnations have mostly been on stage either dramatically or my set designs, film and telly.
but once upon a time, i sat first chair percussion, (xylophone, glockenspiel, marimba, kettle, bass, snare, cymbals..whatever they threw in my pit! i only had a few beats between notes for movement down the line to the next instrument!)
i started on piano, and will always play, when there is one about.
i mostly sit at this keyboard. i am frequently interrupted by interjections of the mundane, domestic, and biological, the latter in the shape of a little blonde ape who is growing evermore verbal daily!
tiny humans, with all their possibilities and resources intact and everything left to discover!
they are definitely amusing!
last night i stayed up til way too late laughing until i was in tears at the blog linked in "What did make you smile today",
Reasons My Son Is Crying
reading this text above from The Interview made me think of what it must've been like to pioneer jazz.
ignoring rules and boundaries.
we've been in deep conversation here, of late, about the disregard of westernised time signatures, and integration of non-traditional signatures into something less meandering than what you normally get landed with when you venture into the margins of music.
breaking the non-structured rules and integrating something a bit more structured.
we're deeply philosophical about sound round here.
which, at this moment, in Salford, I can report the usual sirens every few minutes, the grinding noise of a drilled screw bottoming out in it's destination in the wall the other side of ours, a loud, Nigerian conversation, (apparently about something rather hilarious),
and the sound of cars and trucks passing outside, all just below the pitch perfect humming of super mario by the four year old at the computer screen.
sounds abound!
I was watching some video a few months back of bits of a movie from a group from sweden, i think.
i can't recall what the movie was called, but the group go around accosting people in public with impromptu performances with everyday objects being used to make the music.
oh, balls, what were they called.....
i'll be back.
i want to check my inbox.

I Like You

check you inbox.

roll on Massive Attack at the Manchester International Festival, hope i/we can make it!

regards BB
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Re: From the Horse's mouth - TTY - Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the p

Margaret Thatcher > What a wank you are Morrissey...What exactly have you done for country sir? The answer is nothing...1979 genius your country was on the verge of becoming a third world country.

What a beautifully articulate sentence.

There are plenty of language schools offering courses in basic literacy; perhaps you should consider joining one.

Also, attending a modern history course might stop you making such ridiculously ill-informed statements on a public forum.

Now, run along...
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
This thread suffers from a whole lot of tl;dr.
 

Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

Hi Johnny, you certainly appear to be fan of Thatch. It's noticable that a lot of those coming out to praise her did not live under her Premiership. Is this the case with you?
This is not to disparage you or your position. I take a different stance. So what?
RJ's comments, whilst I support their spirit are wide of the mark and your are sharp enough to pick away at them.

Actually I'm not a fan. I'm in the "necessary evil" camp. I'm old enough to have voted for her in 1987, but didn't.

I've never voted Tory in my life, but I do recognise that if the unions were not dealt with this country would now be a Venezuela if we were lucky, with inflation running around twenty plus percent and all the problems that entails, as it did here in the seventies. I really wish people would go to Youtube to check out Britain in the seventies. The social history of that time is grim beyond words. I can't recall off the top of my head who said "The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there", but a quick Google will prove that was particularly true of Britain.

As I sit here on my rather tasteful leather sofa, with Victoria Wood nattering on about tea on my 50" Samsung, Barca playing PSG on my laptop, and writing this on my iPad, it is hard to think that when I was a child it would take six weeks to get a landline installed, in a choice of four colours of very limited models of phone, and if I fitted an extension to it myself I would have been breaking the law. And that's just one example of the ways the cold dead hands of bad management and intransigent unions held us in their grip.

One of my most vivid early memories was my Dad connecting up a small B&W television to a car battery because there was no electricity yet again, and watching Ernie (The Fastest Milkman In The West) on TOTP as the picture slowly shrank to the size of a postage stamp as the battery ran down. It sounds a bit like a third world country. It felt like one too.

Britain in the 70s? No thanks. I far prefer it now, and if Thatcher was responsible for even part of that then she did well.

The reason I'm putting another view is in part because of the ridiculous black and white statements by many here, including, it seems to me, quite a few who were probably not even born when she left office, let alone when she first became PM. I thought Morrissey's statement was fair comment, until the "Syria, China" line which neatly manages to insult the ordinary people of all three nations, while again showcasing his recently learnt ability to turn even his simplest opinion into a study in ill-informed bullshit.

In an alternate Thatcher free history of this country it isn't beyond the realms of possibility a certain person would never have left the Labour party and we could now be living with El Presidente George Galloway, almost certainly for life, If that isn't enough to give you chills I don't really know what is.
 

Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

they sympathise with Sinn Fein who are a legitimate political party with legally compliant goals, whether or not you agree with them. The IRA no longer exists, other than as a small rump, who are very dangerous and may try to launch an attack on Thatcher's funeral, according to MI5. The families of those who sank with the Belgrano have ' denied the right to mourn loved ones whose bodies to this day are yet to be recovered.' I don't sympathise with any terrorists. full stop. coming from Brum and having witnessed the events of November 21 1974, I'd be totally delusional if I did. The IRA had no right to bomb Birmingham or Brighton. Thatcher they deemed a legitimate target so a rifle should have been used. Norman Tebbit's wife and others were absolutely not legitimate targets, neither were the 21 who perished in Birmingham:

http://justice4the21.blogspot.co.uk/

Thatcher's intransigence publicly towards the IRA now has to be balanced with the revelation that she was negotiating all along. Ridiculous posturing, the Good Friday Agreement could have happened much earlier if she hadn't been such a head-the-ball:

"Thatcher negotiated with the IRA"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-16366413

The demands of Bobby Sands were hardly unreasonable, yet she chose to take it to the limit. Ridiculous woman.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Sands#Hunger_strike

If she was talking to them privately and attacking them in public doesn't that imply that in the Republican movement the left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing?

Sands wanted political status. No government could sanction that.
 

Bluebirds

Well-Known Member
Bobby Sands... I never knew in many countries he is regarded as a political martyr. things they didn't teach us at school?

(Excuse me citing Wikipedia as a source)

In Europe, there were widespread protests after Sands' death. Five thousand Milanese students burned the Union Flag and chanted 'Freedom for Ulster' during a march.[4] The British Consulate at Ghent was raided.[4] Thousands marched in Paris behind huge portraits of Sands, to chants of 'the IRA will conquer'.[4] In the Portuguese Parliament, the opposition stood for Sands.[4] In Oslo, demonstrators threw a tomato at Elizabeth II, the Queen of the United Kingdom, but missed (The 28-year-old assailant claimed that he had not aimed for the queen, but rather for a smirking British soldier).[4] [36] In the Soviet Union, Pravda described it as 'another tragic page in the grim chronicle of oppression, discrimination, terror, and violence' in Ireland. Russian fans of Bobby Sands published a translation of the "Back Home In Derry" song ("На Родину в Дерри" in Russian).[4] Many French towns and cities have streets named after Sands, including in Nantes, Saint-Étienne, Le Mans, Vierzon, and Saint-Denis.[37] In the Republic of Ireland, Sands' death led to riots and bus burning. IRA members allegedly unsuccessfully attempted to coerce proprietors of shops and other businesses into closing for a national day of mourning.[38] The West German newspaper Die Welt took a negative view of Sands.[4]
Africa
News of the death of Bobby Sands influenced the way in which political prisoners and the ANC in South Africa responded to their own situation, and inspired a new way of resistance.[39][40] Nelson Mandela was said to have been "directly influenced by Bobby Sands",[39] and instigated a successful Hunger Strike on Robben Island.
Americas
A number of political, religious, union and fund-raising institutions chose to honour Sands in the United States. The International Longshoremen's Association in New York announced a 24-hour boycott of British ships.[38][41] Over 1,000 people gathered in New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral to hear Cardinal Terence Cookeoffer a Mass of reconciliation for Northern Ireland. Irish bars in the city were closed for two hours in mourning.[4] In Hartford, Connecticut a memorial was dedicated to Bobby Sands and the other hunger strikers in 1997, the only one of its kind in the United States. Set up by the Irish Northern Aid Committee and local Irish-Americans, it stands in a traffic circle known as Bobby Sands Circle at the bottom of Maple Avenue near Goodwin Park.[42]
The New Jersey General Assembly, the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature, voted 34-29 for a resolution honouring his "courage and commitment."[4]
The US media expressed a range of opinions on Sands' death. The Boston Globe commented that "[t]he slow suicide attempt of Bobby Sands has cast his land and his cause into another downward spiral of death and despair. There are no heroes in the saga of Bobby Sands."[43] The Chicago Tribune wrote that "Mahatma Gandhi used the hunger strike to move his countrymen to abstain from fratricide. Bobby Sands' deliberate slow suicide is intended to precipitate civil war. The former deserved veneration and influence. The latter would be viewed, in a reasonable world, not as a charismatic martyr but as a fanatical suicide, whose regrettable death provides no sufficient occasion for killing others."[44]
The New York Times wrote that "Britain's prime minister Thatcher is right in refusing to yield political status to Bobby Sands, the Irish Republican Army hunger striker," but that by appearing "unfeeling and unresponsive" the British Government was giving Sands "the crown of martyrdom."[45] The San Francisco Chronicle argued that political belief should not exempt activists from criminal law: "Terrorism goes far beyond the expression of political belief. And dealing with it does not allow for compromise as many countries of Western Europe and United States have learned. The bombing of bars, hotels, restaurants, robbing of banks, abductions, and killings of prominent figures are all criminal acts and must be dealt with by criminal law."[46]
Some American critics and journalists suggested that American press coverage was a "melodrama".[47] One journalist in particular criticised the large pro-IRA Irish-American contingent which "swallow IRA propaganda as if it were taffy," and concluded that IRA "terrorist propaganda triumphs."[48]
Archbishop John R. Roach, president of the US Catholic bishops, called Sands' death "a useless sacrifice".[49] The Ledger of May 5, 1981 under the headline “To some he was a hero, to others a terrorist” claims that the hunger strike made Sands "a hero among Irish Republicans or Nationalists seeking the reunion of Protestant-dominated and British-ruled Northern Ireland with the predominantly Catholic Irish Republic to the south."[50]
The Ledger cited Sands as telling his friends: “If I die, God will understand," and one of his last messages to them being, “Tell everyone I’ll see them somewhere, sometime.” [50]
In 2001, a memorial to Sands and the other hunger strikers was unveiled in Havana, Cuba.[51]
Asia and the Middle East
In Tehran, Iran, President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr sent a message of condolence to the Sands family.[52] The government renamed Winston Churchill Boulevard, the location of the Embassy of the United Kingdom in Tehran, to Bobby Sands Street, prompting the embassy to move its entrance door to Ferdowsi Avenue to avoid using Bobby Sands Street on its letterhead.[53] A street in the Elahieh district is also named after Sands.[54] An official blue and white street sign was affixed to the rear wall of the British embassy compound saying (in Persian) "Bobby Sands Street" with three words of explanation "militant Irish guerrilla".[52][55] The official Pars news agency called Bobby Sands' death "heroic".[52] There have subsequently been claims that the British foreign secretary has pressured Iranian authorities to change the name of Bobby Sands Street but this is denied.[56][57][58] A burger bar in Tehran is named in honour of Sands.[59][60]
In Israel/Palestine, Palestinian prisoners incarcerated in the Israeli desert prison of Nafha sent a letter, which was smuggled out and reached Belfast in July, 1981, which read;
"To the families of Bobby Sands and his martyred comrades. We, revolutionaries of the Palestinian people...extend our salutes and solidarity with you in the confrontation against the oppressive terrorist rule enforced upon the Irish people by the British ruling elite. We salute the heroic struggle of Bobby Sands and his comrades, for they have sacrificed the most valuable possession of any human being. They gave their lives for freedom."
The Hindustan Times said Margaret Thatcher had allowed a fellow Member of Parliament to die of starvation, an incident which had never before occurred "in a civilised country."[4]
In the Indian Parliament, opposition members in the upper house Rajya Sabha stood for a minute's silence in tribute. The ruling Congress Party did not join in.[4] Protest marches were organized against the British government and in tribute to Sands and his fellow hunger strikers.[61]
The Hong Kong Standard said it was 'sad that successive British governments have failed to end the last of Europe's religious wars.'[4]
A large monument dedicated to Irish protagonists for independence from Britain, including Bobby Sands, stands in the Waverley Cemetery in Sydney, Australia.
 
W

woodland

Guest
Re: From the Horse's mouth - TTY - Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the p

Margaret Thatcher > What a wank you are Morrissey...What exactly have you done for country sir? The answer is nothing...1979 genius your country was on the verge of becoming a third world country.

The answer is he has done so much about your english economy.He shells records abroad.Is that money that goes to english economy sir?
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

This thread suffers from a whole lot of tl;dr.

yeah, cuz your 'musings' on hermaphrodite androgyny are so Twitter friendly. Dork.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Re: Article: Morrissey on the death of Margaret Thatcher, the press - statement at TT

If she was talking to them privately and attacking them in public doesn't that imply that in the Republican movement the left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing?

Sands wanted political status. No government could sanction that.

No, it implies she was duplicitous and ratcheted up the media to unreasoned braying about The Troubles rather than negotiate to end them. Sands had political status and certainly does now. The British regarded Obama's grand-father in Kenya as a 'terrorist' rather than a freedom fighter. Thatcher used the conflict in Ireland to self-aggrandize herself, just like that with Argentina. You might want to reflect on how many convicted terrorists whose release has been sanctioned by the British government as an expedient compromise to make the British mainland safe from Republican bombings.
 

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