Morrissey in cinema watching James Baldwin documentary

Quando quando quando

Well-Known Member
Blimey! I reckon me just saw Morrissey with Ice Cube at this pub in Santa Monica called the Regal Beagle but me forget me Iphone. All me mats back home in Manc will never believe me! I knew spending me life savings on a trip to LA would be worth it. Cheers....Nigel

Nigel?
Farage?
Are you now on speaking terms with him too?
Do tell us more!
Maybe an intern you know?
 

Sister I'm a Poet

If the body were not the soul, what is the soul?
I reckon did any of you lots see that old movie "The Commitments"? Some Irish Catholic people like to think that they have things in common with black Americans in terms of prejudice. This is all part of Uncle Steve's many phases he goes through in his life like "all reggae is vile". All the prejudice against blacks in the US ended in 1964 and this "prejudice" was only prevalent in the extreme South were all the British immigrants settled in the 1700's. It is overrated. Blacks in the USA have more rights and money than blacks in any other country. This is a country who had a half black president with a 100% black wife for 8 years. You Brits and Euros on this site who save all your money and go to New York, Planet Hollywood Orlando, or The HardRock in Las Vegas, think you know so much about the USA and you don't.
I am also an American and I find your post incredibly ignorant. "All the prejudice against blacks in the US ended in 1964 and this "prejudice" was only prevalent in the extreme South". Are you joking? You definitely need to see the movie! And read a newspaper, and watch the news (Not Fox please!)
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
There is nothing wrong with that, I was merely pointing it out to another poster who seemed to think this was evidence of Morrissey as some kind of burgeoning black activist. I am no claiming Morrissey has no interest in civil rights , just that his interests have historically always been queer-based. Hence the autobiography extract focusing on Baldwin's sexuality, and the fact that he idolises someone like Baldwin, rather than Malcolm X or somebody. It's easy to see where the appeal lies.

Regarding footage of police violence during 'Ganglord' - call me cynical, I find it hard to believe that the ultimate inspiration here is Morrissey's hatred of authority, and anyone (police, airport officials) daring to tell him what to do.

I don't think Morrissey is a flat-out racist, though his statements have been inconsistent at best. I'm sure he does care about people he thinks are oppressed - I just don't think it's particularly high on his list of interests.

And what exactly is queer about Maya Angelou?
 

bun bun

team baklava
A

Anonymous

Guest
Over the years I've found Morrissey's political pronouncements less and less credible. They aren't thoughtful or considered or insightful, or offering solutions or an alternative way. They just proclaim 'this is bad' or 'that is bad' in the reactionary way that shares more in common with the views of a fifteen year old boy rather than an adult in his fifties. Yes, all the things he points out are bad but the easiest political position in the world to adopt is one of opposition.

On the racism thing, back in 1992 I would have defended him to the hilt over those accusations. Yes, I cringed at the 'it's hard enough when you belong here' line in Bengali in Platforms and still do, but I put it down to clumsy language rather than any underlying racist world view. Years later I have to say I'm not so sure. His comments over the years on the nature of Englishness have left a bad taste and his recent adulation of Farage is repugnant. Why he would admire crude nationalism that promotes intolerance and division is baffling.

I suspect that at his heart Morrissey is not racist. I just think like most white northern males who grew up on in that era in a fairly comfortable upper working class area and a nice house, that his core beliefs are founded on that relatively homogenous, white world. Also having watched him flirt with imagery of working class, hard men, gangsters, boxers over the course of his career, I suspect that draping himself in the union flag at Madstock was simply an attempt to ingratiate himself with a fairly right wing, macho, working class crowd. But ultimately only Morrissey himself knows his true intention that day and his true views now.

Regardless, he's no great political thinker and I think we should all look elsewhere for insight and inspiration.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Over the years I've found Morrissey's political pronouncements less annd less credible. They aren't thoughtful or considered or insightful, or offering solutions or an alternative way. They just proclaim 'this is bad' or 'that is bad' in the reactionary way that shares more in common with the views of a fifteen year old boy rather than an adult in his fifties. Yes, all the things he points out are bad but the easiest political position in the world to adopt is one of opposition.

On the racism thing, back in 1992 I would have defended him to the hilt over those accusations. Yes, I cringed at the 'it's hard enough when you belong here' line in Bengali in Platforms and still do, but I put it down to clumsy language rather than any underlying racist world view. Years later I have to say I'm not so sure. His comments over the years on the nature of Englishness have left a bad taste and his recent adulation of Farage is repugnant. Why he would admire crude nationalism that promotes intolerance and division is baffling.

I suspect that at his heart Morrissey is not racist. I just think like most white northern males who grew up on in that era in a fairly comfortable upper working class area and a nice house, that his core beliefs are founded on that relatively homogenous, white world. Also having watched him flirt with imagery of working class, hard men, gangsters, boxers over the course of his career, I suspect that draping himself in the union flag at Madstock was simply an attempt to ingratiate himself with a fairly right wing, macho, working class crowd. But ultimately only Morrissey himself knows his true intention that day and his true views now.

Regardless, he's no great political thinker and I think we should all look elsewhere for insight and inspiration.

Very informative :thumbsup:
I don't think you'll have long to wait before the bots and munchkins give you some abuse for going against the wizard.
Which one will bite first ? Betting starts now ! :rofl:

Benny-the-British-Butcher :greatbritain::knife:
 

AztecCamera

Well-Known Member
I reckon I'm like Uncle Steve. I rarely venture out of my Malibu house and the beach and if I do, it's to Beverly Hills, West Hollywood, Encino, or the Calabasas Costco, just like Morrissey and you would not catch me dead in the South, Midwest, or the East Coast, but there isn't any prejudice in Malibu except when Dave Evans did that add on to his house after the last U2 tour and blocked everybody's view.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><>
Over the years I've found Morrissey's political pronouncements less and less credible. They aren't thoughtful or considered or insightful, or offering solutions or an alternative way. They just proclaim 'this is bad' or 'that is bad' in the reactionary way that shares more in common with the views of a fifteen year old boy rather than an adult in his fifties. Yes, all the things he points out are bad but the easiest political position in the world to adopt is one of opposition.

On the racism thing, back in 1992 I would have defended him to the hilt over those accusations. Yes, I cringed at the 'it's hard enough when you belong here' line in Bengali in Platforms and still do, but I put it down to clumsy language rather than any underlying racist world view. Years later I have to say I'm not so sure. His comments over the years on the nature of Englishness have left a bad taste and his recent adulation of Farage is repugnant. Why he would admire crude nationalism that promotes intolerance and division is baffling.

I suspect that at his heart Morrissey is not racist. I just think like most white northern males who grew up on in that era in a fairly comfortable upper working class area and a nice house, that his core beliefs are founded on that relatively homogenous, white world. Also having watched him flirt with imagery of working class, hard men, gangsters, boxers over the course of his career, I suspect that draping himself in the union flag at Madstock was simply an attempt to ingratiate himself with a fairly right wing, macho, working class crowd. But ultimately only Morrissey himself knows his true intention that day and his true views now.

Regardless, he's no great political thinker and I think we should all look elsewhere for insight and inspiration.

'But ultimately only Morrissey himself knows his true intention that day and his true views now.'

Insightful, thank you. It's strange how much ones environment can shape a person. Though more interesting is the complexity of it all(which rarely if ever is brought into the conversation). As example, how M would use working class imagery and throw it right up against imagery or views that highlight a contradiction in his inspiration,asthetics and interests, such as
nail varnish, gold lamé shirts against cuffed jeans and doc martins,
playing Klaus Nomi then a back drop of Albert Finney to two skinhead girls then Edith Sitwell.

But I agree, it's easy for us to make assumptions and to speculate, for as you wrote ' ultimately only Morrissey himself knows'. :thumb:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Very informative :thumbsup:
I don't think you'll have long to wait before the bots and munchkins give you some abuse for going against the wizard.
Which one will bite first ? Betting starts now ! :rofl:

Benny-the-British-Butcher :greatbritain::knife:

L O L ! :laughing: You landed KetchupBum.

BtBB
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Had to laugh this morning watching Sunday Brunch on channel 4.
Russell Braindamage was one of the guests sampling various cheeses :rofl:
What is the point being a vegetarian ? Yet eating cheese and dairy products :mock:

Power to the people ! World revolution ! :laughing:

The shit and verbal diarrhoea we have to put up with just to keep him off the drugs :head-smack:
Do us a favour and get back on em Russell you gobshite hypocrite.

Cheeseatarian's of the world unite and take over. :tiphat:

Eggs ? Cheese ? Dairy ? M U R D E R !
" Oh but do you care ? Do you care ? Do you care ? "

World cheese is none of Steve or Russell's business :tiphat:

Over to you bots/munchkins

Benny-the-British-Butcher :greatbritain::knife: (Hated for pointing out Steve's lazy gimmick, earning a crust off the back of animals and their welfare)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Over the years I've found Morrissey's political pronouncements less and less credible. They aren't thoughtful or considered or insightful, or offering solutions or an alternative way. They just proclaim 'this is bad' or 'that is bad' in the reactionary way that shares more in common with the views of a fifteen year old boy rather than an adult in his fifties. Yes, all the things he points out are bad but the easiest political position in the world to adopt is one of opposition.

On the racism thing, back in 1992 I would have defended him to the hilt over those accusations. Yes, I cringed at the 'it's hard enough when you belong here' line in Bengali in Platforms and still do, but I put it down to clumsy language rather than any underlying racist world view. Years later I have to say I'm not so sure. His comments over the years on the nature of Englishness have left a bad taste and his recent adulation of Farage is repugnant. Why he would admire crude nationalism that promotes intolerance and division is baffling.

I suspect that at his heart Morrissey is not racist. I just think like most white northern males who grew up on in that era in a fairly comfortable upper working class area and a nice house, that his core beliefs are founded on that relatively homogenous, white world. Also having watched him flirt with imagery of working class, hard men, gangsters, boxers over the course of his career, I suspect that draping himself in the union flag at Madstock was simply an attempt to ingratiate himself with a fairly right wing, macho, working class crowd. But ultimately only Morrissey himself knows his true intention that day and his true views now.

Regardless, he's no great political thinker and I think we should all look elsewhere for insight and inspiration.


An artist reveals only what he is comfortable. He is a very self conscious person and maybe not comfortable with going deaper. I imagine if he felt comfortable with someone you would hear his genius.

UNLIKE BENNY, who is very comfortable with his opinion.:swear
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
Over the years I've found Morrissey's political pronouncements less and less credible. They aren't thoughtful or considered or insightful, or offering solutions or an alternative way. They just proclaim 'this is bad' or 'that is bad' in the reactionary way that shares more in common with the views of a fifteen year old boy rather than an adult in his fifties. Yes, all the things he points out are bad but the easiest political position in the world to adopt is one of opposition.

On the racism thing, back in 1992 I would have defended him to the hilt over those accusations. Yes, I cringed at the 'it's hard enough when you belong here' line in Bengali in Platforms and still do, but I put it down to clumsy language rather than any underlying racist world view. Years later I have to say I'm not so sure. His comments over the years on the nature of Englishness have left a bad taste and his recent adulation of Farage is repugnant. Why he would admire crude nationalism that promotes intolerance and division is baffling.

I suspect that at his heart Morrissey is not racist. I just think like most white northern males who grew up on in that era in a fairly comfortable upper working class area and a nice house, that his core beliefs are founded on that relatively homogenous, white world. Also having watched him flirt with imagery of working class, hard men, gangsters, boxers over the course of his career, I suspect that draping himself in the union flag at Madstock was simply an attempt to ingratiate himself with a fairly right wing, macho, working class crowd. But ultimately only Morrissey himself knows his true intention that day and his true views now.

Regardless, he's no great political thinker and I think we should all look elsewhere for insight and inspiration.

Who is a great political thinker now? You only know what media tells you and they sell mostly bs. That's why everything is "a mess" like says our new "fantastic" political thinker.
I don't sympathize with nationalism because usually nationalist leaders use people in their own benefit and there's a high risk democracy turns into demagogy and later in dictatorship. Then you end with a queen, supporting a palace and being the subject of someone. Like the experience we recently had in my country.
But I know something: poor people are mostly nationalist. Do you know why? Because, wrongly or not, they think their country is the only thing they have, it's their only safe net to survive. And I think they are right in thinking so.
If you have money, high education, a job in a multinational corporation, a musical band, you can move to anywhere. The world is yours to chose a place with a political system you like to live in. If you are paying a mortage and your everyday food depends on a local salary you see the world and politics in a very different way. That's why I think those who critizice people who voted Trump or Farage are unconsiderate morons. They can talk about politicians, but they shouldn't mess with people who are obliged to vote without true good alternatives and their everyday lives really depend on the way their country manages domestic economy.
 

MIDNITE

Active Member
No, insinuating that he may have had snacks is fine (as long as you are careful to point out that said snacks were vegan snacks). It's only insinuations of M snacking on a cock that make the fan fraus go off the deep end.

Just becasue your Gay, it does,nt nessaserrilly mean u have 2 try and convince the rest of us with your unfounded assumptions that morrissey is gay 2 !
We all know who morrissey loves, allways has and allways will !
Well some of us do anyways ! , but thats his own private affair !


There you are, emulating Kristeen Young at her best. Again.

Steady now countthree !!! :thumb: :)
 
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rifke

team bougatsa
lol
 

bun bun

team baklava
No, insinuating that he may have had snacks is fine (as long as you are careful to point out that said snacks were vegan snacks). It's only insinuations of M snacking on a cock that make the fan fraus go off the deep end.

Just becasue your Gay, it does,nt nessaserrilly mean u have 2 try and convince the rest of us with your unfounded assumptions that morrissey is gay 2 !
We all know who morrissey loves, allways has and allways will !
Well some of us do anyways ! , but thats his own private affair !


Steady now countthree !!!

Case in point.

Also ... "Your gay!, " nessaserrilly" etc ... Is your abominable writing a "thing" or are you really that illiterate?
 

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