Morrissey A-Z: "(The) World Is Full of Crashing Bores"

Janice

Well-Known Member
I played this to death when it first appeared and subsequently started to dislike it. However, fear not, it’s back in the good books. 🥰
 

Phranc & Open

two-timer
As much as I have issues with the lyrics, I do agree that the original faster 2002 live version was far superior. As with 'Mexico', Jerry Finn seems to have sucked all the life out of it in studio. It just seems so slow and dull in comparison.
I am still not quite clear about the lyrics Of course, it also contains the frustrations from the 1996 trial, directed against everything and everyone, and then pleads again, very Morrissey-like "Take me in your arms & love me...". Musically, this was designed in 2002 as a typical Morrissey sing-along anthem, that I rated the best of the new songs, judging from good live recordings. Mexico was also much better than the final result in the studio.
 
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Famous when dead

Vulgarian
Moderator
An early usage I'd found a while back:

Wiliam Golding:
"Marx, Darwin and Freud are the three most crashing bores of the Western World. Simplistic popularization of their ideas has thrust our world into a mental straitjacket from which we can only escape by the most anarchic violence."

See also Dad's Army:

Regards,
FWD.
 

Carlislebaz

Cock of the north
I am still not quite clear about the lyrics Of course, it also contains the frustrations from the 1996 trial, directed against everything and everyone, and then pleads again, very Morrissey-like "Take me in your arms & love me...". Musically, this was designed in 2002 as a typical Morrissey sing-along anthem, that I rated the best of the new songs, judging from good live recordings. Mexico was also much better than the final result in the studio.
I can recall moz interview with Janice long and she asked him about this song , who were the crashing bores?
I’m sure he mentioned Elton John was a crashing bore, thrusting his private life onto every one.
But I’m doubtful if the lyrics refer to EJ
 

Phranc & Open

two-timer
I can recall moz interview with Janice long and she asked him about this song , who were the crashing bores?
I’m sure he mentioned Elton John was a crashing bore, thrusting his private life onto every one.
But I’m doubtful if the lyrics refer to EJ
I am glad he changed his view on Elton later on. Elton came to terms with himself and everyone was invited to watch. Not everyone's cup of tea but I have respect for him and his songs were larger than life too. Take "Blue Eyes" f.e. He was at the bottom personally in 1982 but at the same time released fu*** brilliant tunes.
 
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Carlislebaz

Cock of the north
I am glad he changed his view on Elton later on. Elton came to terms with himself and everyone was invited to watch. Not everyone's cup of tea but I have respect for him and his songs were larger than life too. Take "Blue Eyes" f.e. He was at the bottom personally in 1982 but at the same time released fu*** brilliant tunes.
Yes. The world certainly is brighter with the likes of EJ knocking about
 

Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.
YATQ wasn’t the first Moz album I heard, but it was the first one to be released since I had become a fan, and this is one of the songs that best remind me of that time/era/whatever. A fantastic time to be a Morrissey fan, he was everywhere and did nothing wrong. And this song, among many others, was a fantastic companion to have when crossing over into adulthood and feeling like you didn’t fit in anywhere.
 

Thewlis

Junior Member
I love this song, such a great singalong and the lyrics ring truer and truer as the years move on. Having a go at everyone including himself. And I must be one

An updated and more dignified Get Off the Stage if you like ;)

9,2
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Having a go at everyone including himself.
Hardly. The song's lyrical conclusion couldn't be any more direct and unambiguous:

"This world, I am afraid,
Is designed for crashing bores.
I am not one.
I am not one."
 

Flibberty

Well-Known Member
One of the least impressive songs on YATQ and I can't say that I ever loved it even in its original live arrangement. The two singles were the standouts of the 5 new live songs of 2012.

Fairly obvious lyrics and a dirge of a tune.

In the poll on the Hoffman board it ranked 142nd from 264 solo songs.
 

Southport Grandma

Active Member
An early usage I'd found a while back:

Wiliam Golding:
"Marx, Darwin and Freud are the three most crashing bores of the Western World. Simplistic popularization of their ideas has thrust our world into a mental straitjacket from which we can only escape by the most anarchic violence."

See also Dad's Army:

Regards,
FWD.
The phrase “crashing bores” also appears in the Kenneth Williams diaries.
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
Hardly. The song's lyrical conclusion couldn't be any more direct and unambiguous:

"This world, I am afraid,
Is designed for crashing bores.
I am not one.
I am not one."

But that's the narrator trying to ward off the terror that he is a crashing bore & that's why no one loves him.*

If it was an empowerment/dis song it would be easier to market.

*Edit - actually I think it's pleading with someone specific. So more active than that.
 
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Anonymiris

Guest
Hardly. The song's lyrical conclusion couldn't be any more direct and unambiguous:

"This world, I am afraid,
Is designed for crashing bores.
I am not one.
I am not one."
Not necessarily. To me, the pleading way he sings these lines as well as the following "You don't understand" suggest that he is trying to convince others and possible himself that he is not like the others.

Generally speaking, I find it somewhat annoying when people claim to have unambiguously understood a song lyric or other piece of art, possibly because they are unable or unwilling to consider other interpretations. Moreover, in a song not just the lyrics but also the way in which they are delivered conveys meaning.

I should say that I liked this song better when I first started listening to Morrissey. While a bit blunt, I do think that the lyrics might be even more relevant today than when he wrote them.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hardly. The song's lyrical conclusion couldn't be any more direct and unambiguous:

"This world, I am afraid,
Is designed for crashing bores.
I am not one.
I am not one."
He isn’t one though. He’s always genuinely himself. He always says what he feels no matter how much damage it does. It’s why so many people were polarized and followed his interviews over his career. So I have zero issue with his declaration of difference over the other PC “say what gets me more work” literal crashing bites.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
It is not my favorite song on YATQ, but it is one of my favorite titles, because the world does feel like a place for crashing bores at times and I like to quote it. And I am still happy to hear it live.
 

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member

Correct, 2 shows in 2017:


 
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