Morrissey A-Z: "I Don't Mind If You Forget Me"

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
It's a cruel 'f*** you' surely aimed at Marr, but a cracking song. Shame it's never played live, but I guess Jesse would just make a mess of the guitar solo.
Love this song. It's a perfect mixture of bravado and self-pity - that switch from "I understand, bye bye..." to "I really don't understand this time" and the way his voice changes from breezy to angry - really encapsulates all the different emotions when someone leaves or lets you down. The whole song is saying "See if I care!" and then showing, quite obviously, that he does.
 

Watson

Well-Known Member
I love everything about this song, and always have since I first heard it, but with the passing of time my favourite part is this:

Sincerely I must tell you
Your mild 'best wishes'
They make me suspicious


which anticipated the whole "work email sign-off debate" by a good 20 or 30 years.
I think this is one of the most wonderful posts ever in the history of Solo. I couldn't agree more. Thank you.
 

Watson

Well-Known Member
Do we agree that this is just an incredible song and one of the reasons why we continue to listen to Morrissey, through thick and (very) thin? In my worthless opinion, VH is his best solo album and the one I always return to whether happy or sad.
 

Mike Rourke

Active Member
One thing to add - I always saw this as a potential retort to the Simple Minds song, Don't You Forget About Me, or at least a response to the tired sentiments of that kind of song.
Also love the way the manic guitar outro leads into the beautifully understated strum of Dial A Cliché.
Great song positioning!
 

Flibberty

Well-Known Member
I kind of do, actually! Different vibes but both brilliant albums...
Yeah, I think that sums it up.

As they are from different eras with different subject matters, songwriters and producers it would be odd if there were a consensus of opinion about Viva Hate and Vauxhall and I. Both deservedly highly rated albums, though.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
Do we agree that this is just an incredible song and one of the reasons why we continue to listen to Morrissey, through thick and (very) thin? In my worthless opinion, VH is his best solo album and the one I always return to whether happy or sad.
We have already reviewed 7 tracks from Viva Hate + 2 of its B-sides, and there were many warm sentiments expressed for nearly all of them. And we still have to discuss Suedehead and Maudlin Street. So VH is definitely up there with the very best he's ever done. It strikes me that many of the themes - leaving behind one's youthful years, the struggle to be yourself, parting with dear ones (like Johnny Marr) still resonate with me after all those years. It's lyrically very strong. And let me also praise Vini Reilly for his frantic guitar sound on this one (as well as on Alsation Cousin and Hairdresser On Fire).
 

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
We have already reviewed 7 tracks from Viva Hate + 2 of its B-sides, and there were many warm sentiments expressed for nearly all of them. And we still have to discuss Suedehead and Maudlin Street. So VH is definitely up there with the very best he's ever done. It strikes me that many of the themes - leaving behind one's youthful years, the struggle to be yourself, parting with dear ones (like Johnny Marr) still resonate with me after all those years. It's lyrically very strong. And let me also praise Vini Reilly for his frantic guitar sound on this one (as well as on Alsation Cousin and Hairdresser On Fire).
It's hard to imagine a better start to Morrissey's solo career than Viva Hate. To me, it's just a shame that the Morrissey/Street relationship didn't last longer. I really believe there was at least one more gem of an album between them.
 

This Charming Bowie

Welcome to this knockabout world
And let me also praise Vini Reilly for his frantic guitar sound on this one (as well as on Alsation Cousin and Hairdresser On Fire).
Interestingly, I just read in Mozipedia that Stephen Street himself played the guitar on this track: the Buzzcocks-like solo was “too simple” for Vini, so he refused to play it!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Both Goddard and Rogan only mention Street playing the simple guitar break himself. Rogan specifies that Vini Reilly plays the rest of the guitar parts himself.
Not having read either, but just from listening I presume Street played the lead guitar line that accompanies 'Rejection is one thing,but rejection from a fool is cruel'. The rest of it, including the actual solo,sounds like Vini.
 

Thewlis

Junior Member
This used to be one of my faves back in the day. Hasn’t dated so well with me though, although it still brings a smile to my face hearing it now. Amusing lyrics, but the music is a bit too frantic. Motown meets Buzzcocks Street said, but that’s too much praise. A fine song but with a bit more work on the music it could have been contender for 3rd single and a classic like HoF.

8,3
 
N

No 27

Guest
This used to be one of my faves back in the day. Hasn’t dated so well with me though, although it still brings a smile to my face hearing it now. Amusing lyrics, but the music is a bit too frantic. Motown meets Buzzcocks Street said, but that’s too much praise. A fine song but with a bit more work on the music it could have been contender for 3rd single and a classic like HoF.

8,3
This doesn't sound anything like Motown. It bears no resemblance whatsoever. I liked it a lot, but I never listen to it now.
 
Tags
morrissey a-z
Top Bottom