Morrissey A-Z: "Don't Interrupt the Sorrow"

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchbacked Smut Peddler
This song and cover are fantastic. The rhythm and arrangement of the song are superb. The fluid way it glides by and can seem emphatically denouncing one moment and hazy the next. Makes me feel like I’m coming in and out of a heavy conversation in some smoke filled room
And Joni Mitchell does smoke.
 

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
.


Love it! Love it! Love it!

Did I forget to mention that I ..

Love it?


This period of Joni Mitchell was a blueprint for Viva Hate for Morrissey in the way he approached or heard it in his minds ear, just for this we should bow down to the mighty Joni and be grateful that Morrissey has such great taste in music and was inspired by muse Joni to help guide him through a tough time.

As with all his covers, it’s unfortunate so many don’t try to imagine what’s under them, and what they may possibly mean to him
or why he chose a particular artist from all the artists he could have chosen. Usually it’s going back to his roots, showing us why and who made it possible for him to bring to us the music that he has, and the person that he is. Without them he wouldn’t be here, we wouldn’t be here.

Thank you Joni.


:)




darn right


in flames our prophet witches


be polite


:cool:
 
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GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

The Courage to Get on People's Tits
.


Love it! Love it! Love it!

Did I forget to mention that I ..

Love it?


This period of Joni Mitchell was a blueprint for Viva Hate for Morrissey in the way he approached or heard it in his minds ear, just for this we should bow down to the mighty Joni and be grateful that Morrissey has such great taste in music and was inspired by muse Joni to help guide him through a tough time.

As with all his covers, it’s unfortunate so many don’t try to imagine what’s under them, and what they may possibly mean to him
or why he chose a particular artist from all the artists he could have chosen. Usually it’s going back to his roots, showing us why and who made it possible for him to bring to us the music that he has, and the person that he is. Without them he wouldn’t be here, we wouldn’t be here.

Thank you Joni.


:)




darn right


in flames our prophet witches


be polite


:cool:

Well said, Ket.

There would be no Late Night, Maudlin Street without Joni.
 

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
I love Joni and grew up with her music because my father is a fan so I was quite excited when the tracklist was announced and this was on it, though I would have preferred to hear him do The Jungle Line. Surprised he didn't choose a track from Don Juan's Reckless Daughter, the record that had the biggest lyrical influence on him.

His version is nice, very soft and gentle to the ear. A bit overproduced for my taste, but a highlight on the album regardless.

View attachment 68896 View attachment 68897


The interview Morrissey did with Joni in October 1996 on occasion of the release of her Hits and Misses compilations is worth a listen.



The Jungle Line is mind blowing! Not only the lyric which is in fact poetry, but also the overall sound and musical
choices that make up the song, or I should say, the world one enters after pushing play or putting the needle down. I experience the same thing with the song Maladjusted, unsurprisingly.

Also, maybe this is what you meant, but for me the production on CS is well, not so much that it’s overproduced, but that everything is
a little too clear, a little too available to the ear. I prefer an older way of production, more richness, more smear in the frequency, more clouds in the soundscape, basically.. give me mystery! The biggest thorn in my side with modern productions in general is why do the drums especially the kick always have to be so heard? I don’t think it’s always necessary.


Did you ever get a chance to share Morrissey’s version with your father
and what does he think of it?
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

The Courage to Get on People's Tits
The Jungle Line is mind blowing! Not only the lyric which is in fact poetry, but also the overall sound and musical
choices that make up the song, or I should say, the world one enters after pushing play or putting the needle down. I experience the same thing with the song Maladjusted, unsurprisingly.
I agree. It's one of my favourite Joni songs.

Also, maybe this is what you meant, but for me the production on CS is well, not so much that it’s overproduced, but that everything is
a little too clear, a little too available to the ear. I prefer the older way of production, more richness, more smear in the frequency, more clouds in the soundscape, basically.. give me mystery! The biggest thorn in my side with modern productions in general is why do the drums especially the kick always have to be so heard? I don’t think it’s always necessary.
It's too smooth but also there are so many unnecessary effects and blips and bleeps (not so much on Don't Interrupt The Sorrow but on other songs).

Did you ever get a chance to share Morrissey’s version with your father
and what does he think of it?
Yes! He liked it, but said it sounded a bit too 'modern' for his taste.
 

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
I agree. It's one of my favourite Joni songs.


It's too smooth but also there are so many unnecessary effects and blips and bleeps (not so much on Don't Interrupt The Sorrow but on other songs).

Yes too many blips and bleeps, though Joe mixes them in a little more tastefully than Jerry did on YATQ, wich was more like ear candy
that my ears kept spitting out. Lol.




Yes! He liked it, but said it sounded a bit too 'modern' for his taste.

:thumb::lbf:Then we probably have similar tastes in production. Though that’s not to say I don’t like modern production, it does have its place if it’s done creatively, which is rare.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

The Courage to Get on People's Tits
Yes too many blips and bleeps, though Joe mixes them in a little more tastefully than Jerry did on YATQ, wich was more like ear candy
that my ears kept spitting out. Lol.
Yeah 😬

:thumb::lbf:Then we probably have similar tastes in production. Though that’s not to say I don’t like modern production, it does have its place if it’s done creatively, which is rare.
Interestingly, he probably buys more 'new' music than I do 😂
 
I'm not sure placing this track 2nd on the album was the best choice, as it's not the most accessible of songs and it affects the flow a little.

It benefits from a very fine vocal though, and I also really enjoy the production.

It didn't immediately leap out at me, but has proven to be a grower.

In the poll on the other board it ranked 128th from 264 solo songs.
Could you give an actual link to the other poll? Would be good to see the results.
Would also be interesting to know roughly how many people voted for the songs.
Thanks.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm not sure placing this track 2nd on the album was the best choice, as it's not the most accessible of songs and it affects the flow a little.
Good point. Personally I don't really have a clue what it's about, but the lyrics are certainly mysterious and interesting, and Morrissey provides a great vocal performance. Musically it's a bit dreary though, and doesn't do much for me.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
The original is one of my favorite songs in the world and I was intrigued when I saw the California Son tracklist announcement and this was on it. Despite that, I don't think I've listened to this too many times but as I'm revisiting it right now it definitely feels the most palatable to me of everything else on that record. This is a style that really works for Morrissey, a dreamy and meandering monologue without a particular verse/chorus structure.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
Morrissey often spoke about the feminist movement of the 1970s as an influential force in his life. This is one of the earlier and best feminist songs of that time, still relevant today. It is also a criticism of patriarchal societies. I am glad that he dared to tackle it. It also fits in well with his current exploration of different styles, and it worked well for him in this case.
 

Mayfly

Well-Known Member
This period of Joni Mitchell was a blueprint for Viva Hate for Morrissey in the way he approached or heard it in his minds ear, just for this we should bow down to the mighty Joni and be grateful that Morrissey has such great taste in music and was inspired by muse Joni to help guide him through a tough time.

As with all his covers, it’s unfortunate so many don’t try to imagine what’s under them, and what they may possibly mean to him
or why he chose a particular artist from all the artists he could have chosen. Usually it’s going back to his roots, showing us why and who made it possible for him to bring to us the music that he has, and the person that he is. Without them he wouldn’t be here, we wouldn’t be here.

Thank you Joni.


:)

.


Love it! Love it! Love it!

Did I forget to mention that I ..

Love it?


This period of Joni Mitchell was a blueprint for Viva Hate for Morrissey in the way he approached or heard it in his minds ear, just for this we should bow down to the mighty Joni and be grateful that Morrissey has such great taste in music and was inspired by muse Joni to help guide him through a tough time.

As with all his covers, it’s unfortunate so many don’t try to imagine what’s under them, and what they may possibly mean to him
or why he chose a particular artist from all the artists he could have chosen. Usually it’s going back to his roots, showing us why and who made it possible for him to bring to us the music that he has, and the person that he is. Without them he wouldn’t be here, we wouldn’t be here.

Thank you Joni.


:)

I don't know how many people would make the connection between Joni Mitchell and Viva Hate. For a long time, I associated Joni Mitchell with the Blue album and Both Sides, which wasn't doing her any justice. So I didn't see that connection. Reflecting on it now, it makes some sense. I feel you can also hear that vibe in Break up the family.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
I don't know how many people would make the connection between Joni Mitchell and Viva Hate. For a long time, I associated Joni Mitchell with the Blue album and Both Sides, which wasn't doing her any justice. So I didn't see that connection. Reflecting on it now, it makes some sense. I feel you can also hear that vibe in Break up the family.
Don't forget that "The Headmaster Ritual" is heavily inspired by "Coyote." The influence had been there since the mid-80s, even for Johnny.

 

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchbacked Smut Peddler
Don't forget that "The Headmaster Ritual" is heavily inspired by "Coyote." The influence had been there since the mid-80s, even for Johnny.

Ah, that's the one I got mixed up with Barbarism Begins at Home
 
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