"Morrissey 25: Live" film review by Stephen Dalton - The Hollywood Reporter

Morrissey 25: Live: Film Review - The Hollywood Reporter
by Stephen Dalton

Remarkable singer marks quarter century milestone with unremarkable concert film.

Snippets...

The original performance began with an onstage introduction by Morrissey’s friend and cheerleader Russell Brand, a heartfelt eulogy which – bizarrely – has been cut from the finished film. Brand and other celebrity acolytes, including Patti Smith, are now glimpsed only fleetingly in an opening montage. This is a baffling omission, considering Brand is not just an eloquent orator but arguably more famous nowadays than Morrissey himself. But as we long-suffering fans know all too well, the Oscar Wilde of pop moves in mysterious ways.

Among the musical highlights are a clutch of Smiths classics. They include a scouringly heavy remake of Meat Is Murder, an angry vegetarian manifesto illustrated with hellish visual clips of animal cruelty, and a graceful rearrangement of the melancholy ballad Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want. Fans of Morrissey’s retro-crooner side will also enjoy his sumptuous, feverishly melodramatic cover version of Frankie Valli’s 1967 torch song, To Give (The Reason I Live).

Compared to the last official Morrissey concert film, Who Put The M In Manchester? In 2004, 25: Live is a largely lackluster affair. Which is frustrating, because the singer remains a unique cultural icon, with more than enough musical treasure and prickly charisma to make a Don’t Look Back or a Stop Making Sense. But that would require a heavyweight director to challenge and cajole him out of his mid-life comfort zone. Until then, he will continue to preach to the converted with perfunctory promotional items like this, which is as good as it needs to be but no more.


 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comments

I had assumed as much :/ It will be nice to watch for the experience of a live later-years Morrissey show in an interesting venue, but it won't be a particularly game-changing release.
 
Like I said in the other thread looks like the reviews of this film are pretty universally "meh." Which is too bad because I was both looking forward to it and I think Morrissey did some truly great shows earlier in the tour, at least pre-ulcer.

He should have recorded the Brooklyn Academy of Music show instead maybe.
 
come back to Camden (ie England!). I loved him however foolish he may be...
Well... the writer/reviewer, Stephen Dalton, is a freelance writer living in the UK. Most likely a native. The film was screened on July 29, in London.

Just clarifying that, in case you thought the writer is a silly American ignoramus. Not saying you did. But just to be safe. :p
 
This review is totally mean, verging on silly. The snipets are reasonable, but upon resding the whole review you can just feel the anti-moz attitude. And of course there is the requisite far bashing, just for good measure.
 
E
This review is totally mean, verging on silly. The snipets are reasonable, but upon resding the whole review you can just feel the anti-moz attitude. And of course there is the requisite far bashing, just for good measure.
Oh, stop your whining, you silly goose. The movie is crap (the Sunday clip proves that) and the review simply points that out. Deal with it.
 
A
Oh, stop your whining, you silly goose. The movie is crap (the Sunday clip proves that) and the review simply points that out. Deal with it.
Oh, stop attacking people for not having the same opinion as you. It's ridiculous that Morrissey _fans_ get harassed by Morrissey haters on a _Morrissey_ fansite. Not everybody wants to enter your hate bubble.

I thought the Everyday is Like Sunday performance was actually pretty good.
 
A
The movie is crap (the Sunday clip proves that
Can't argue with logic like this.

I know I personally have never been impressed by a film's trailer, then disappointed by the film--or vice versa.

Do you review books, too, Eric? Think of how many you could get through in one sitting, looking just at the covers!
 
This review is totally mean, verging on silly. The snipets are reasonable, but upon resding the whole review you can just feel the anti-moz attitude. And of course there is the requisite far bashing, just for good measure.

I only partially agree with you.

"Remarkable singer marks quarter century milestone with unremarkable concert film."

"the Oscar Wilde of pop"

"A master of provocative public statements and witty, literate, emotionally charged lyrics,"

"the singer remains a unique cultural icon, with more than enough musical treasure and prickly charisma to make a Don’t Look Back or a Stop Making Sense."

Referring to Morrissey as a "remarkable singer," "unique cultural icon," comparing him to Oscar Wilde and saying he has musical treasures doesn't really reek of a strong anti-Moz bias. He doesn't even seem to think the film is terrible, just not as good as it could be. And that he seems to blame more the director than Morrissey. He does make some snarky comments about Moz's selection of solo material ("third-rate"), but that's not a critique of Morrissey's back catalogue just his choices. That's a subjective opinion and I don't really agree with him. And he does pick at his band which does sound like he's been reading too much Morrissey solo because none of the live reviews of any his concerts at the time made this criticism.

He does seem contemptuous of the relationship between Morrissey and his fans though and this I find disagreeable. The North Korean dictator, unembarrassed comments were just stupid. If most pop starts passed a microphone around to their fans they probably would get similar comments not "I moderately appreciate your music."
 
Re: Article: "Morrissey 25: Live" film review by Stephen Dalton - The Hollywood Reporter

I only partially agree with you.

"Remarkable singer marks quarter century milestone with unremarkable concert film."

"the Oscar Wilde of pop"

"A master of provocative public statements and witty, literate, emotionally charged lyrics,"

"the singer remains a unique cultural icon, with more than enough musical treasure and prickly charisma to make a Don’t Look Back or a Stop Making Sense."

Referring to Morrissey as a "remarkable singer," "unique cultural icon," comparing him to Oscar Wilde and saying he has musical treasures doesn't really reek of a strong anti-Moz bias. He doesn't even seem to think the film is terrible, just not as good as it could be. And that he seems to blame more the director than Morrissey. He does make some snarky comments about Moz's selection of solo material ("third-rate"), but that's not a critique of Morrissey's back catalogue just his choices. That's a subjective opinion and I don't really agree with him. And he does pick at his band which does sound like he's been reading too much Morrissey solo because none of the live reviews of any his concerts at the time made this criticism.

He does seem contemptuous of the relationship between Morrissey and his fans though and this I find disagreeable. The North Korean dictator, unembarrassed comments were just stupid. If most pop starts passed a microphone around to their fans they probably would get similar comments not "I moderately appreciate your music."
Yeah, he didn't say all mean things, this is true. I was just so disgusted by the Korean Dictator and other comments. I feel the overall tone was that of disgust. He almost made it worse by suggesting he kinda/used to like Moz, but this was too much. His compliments seem insincere.

he refers to Moz handing the audience the mic "sickly ritual, which feels more suited to North Korean dictators than popstars" These are not the words of a man disappointed in a concert film, they are hateful words!

He says Moz appears" increasingly uncomfortable on stage as he ages". Maybe the author is uncomfortable with an ageing Morrissey on stage, but Morrissey himself. is absolutely at home on stage! Not only is he comfortable but he shines!

I was not at this show but I saw him a couple of days later as well as earlier in the year and he's still brilliant on stage.

A negative review is one thing but there is no reason to be viscous!
 
Last edited:
Re: Article: "Morrissey 25: Live" film review by Stephen Dalton - The Hollywood Reporter

Yeah, he didn't say all mean things, this is true. I was just so disgusted by the Korean Dictator and other comments. I feel the overall tone was that of disgust. He almost made it worse by suggesting he kinda/used to like Moz, but this was too much. His compliments seem insincere.

he refers to Moz handing the audience the mic "sickly ritual, which feels more suited to North Korean dictators than popstars" These are not the words of a man disappointed in a concert film, they are hateful words!

He says Moz appears" increasingly uncomfortable on stage as he ages". Maybe the author is uncomfortable with an ageing Morrissey on stage, but Morrissey himself. is absolutely at home on stage! Not only is he comfortable but he shines!

I was not at this show but I saw him a couple of days later as well as earlier in the year and he's still brilliant on stage.

A negative review is one thing but there is no reason to be viscous!
You do know what 'viscous' means, right? And please do go find a review to counteract this terrible viscosity.

P.
 
Re: Article: "Morrissey 25: Live" film review by Stephen Dalton - The Hollywood Reporter

You do know what 'viscous' means, right? And please do go find a review to counteract this terrible viscosity.

P.
Dara O'Briain's science club said glass is not a liquid. So much for my physics teacher
 

Trending Threads

Top Bottom