"Morning Starship" single (Jobriath cover) - Messages from Morrissey ~ available 20th March 2019

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Morrissey_Sucks

Active Member
Have to admit, these cover versions sound fantastic.

That being said, it is clear that Morrissey’s recent output is shit when covers are better than his own original output.
 

Eldritch

Well-Known Member
A much more imaginative and interesting song than It's Over. But what's the release scheme now -- is this just a streaming single or will we get an 7-inch release for this too?
 

billybu69

Junior Member
Subscriber
His taste in music has always been dubious, we should be grateful Golden Lights doesn't get a rehash, wonder if this is the album Johnny Marr split The Smiths up so he wouldn't have to make.
 

RobLand

Visitor since 1997
On pitchfork.com: Oh Ed Droste, Was This Morrissey Collaboration Really Worth It? BY: JAYSON GREENE
https://pitchfork.com/reviews/tracks/morrissey-morning-starship/

For every self-styled provocateur, there is an endpoint—when your pointed bons mots and “misunderstood” inflammatory statements fall on deaf ears. The stage is yours, but the rafters are empty. That moment has not quite yet arrived for Morrissey—after all, he recently sold out a string of Broadway shows—but he has always carried himself with the morose grandeur of a former titan grousing at the smallness of the pictures. His version of Roy Orbison’s “It’s Over,” the first single from the upcoming covers album California Son, found him in an uncharacteristically shaky voice, perhaps quaking in the shadow of one of the greatest vocalists of all time.

The second single is “Morning Starship,” a cover of the 1973 glam-rock songfrom Bruce Wayne Campbell, aka Jobriath. Morrissey is in sturdier shape, but his delivery is missing all of its bite—it sounds dispiritingly like a man at a karaoke bar giving his best Morrissey impression. Grizzly Bear’s Ed Droste is here, somewhere, doing... something—perhaps that is him, singing backing “oh” vocals, millions of miles in the distance in the mix. The arrangement, pumped full of electric guitar leads, drifts from the faux-Bowie stage setting of the original into generic Any-Rock territory. No matter how many dispiriting or alarming news items Morrissey might be generating as of late, you can usually count on him to muster a sense of occasion when he steps into a recording booth. This is Morrissey Minus Morrissey—the voice is there, but the presence has been leached out.
 

NealCassidy

Well-Known Member
On pitchfork.com: Oh Ed Droste, Was This Morrissey Collaboration Really Worth It? BY: JAYSON GREENE
https://pitchfork.com/reviews/tracks/morrissey-morning-starship/

For every self-styled provocateur, there is an endpoint—when your pointed bons mots and “misunderstood” inflammatory statements fall on deaf ears. The stage is yours, but the rafters are empty. That moment has not quite yet arrived for Morrissey—after all, he recently sold out a string of Broadway shows—but he has always carried himself with the morose grandeur of a former titan grousing at the smallness of the pictures. His version of Roy Orbison’s “It’s Over,” the first single from the upcoming covers album California Son, found him in an uncharacteristically shaky voice, perhaps quaking in the shadow of one of the greatest vocalists of all time.

The second single is “Morning Starship,” a cover of the 1973 glam-rock songfrom Bruce Wayne Campbell, aka Jobriath. Morrissey is in sturdier shape, but his delivery is missing all of its bite—it sounds dispiritingly like a man at a karaoke bar giving his best Morrissey impression. Grizzly Bear’s Ed Droste is here, somewhere, doing... something—perhaps that is him, singing backing “oh” vocals, millions of miles in the distance in the mix. The arrangement, pumped full of electric guitar leads, drifts from the faux-Bowie stage setting of the original into generic Any-Rock territory. No matter how many dispiriting or alarming news items Morrissey might be generating as of late, you can usually count on him to muster a sense of occasion when he steps into a recording booth. This is Morrissey Minus Morrissey—the voice is there, but the presence has been leached out.
Must have listened a good few times and given the analysis plenty of thought
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
uncle steve should stop having sex, his music creativity was better before he popped his cherry, now one of the great lyricists is reduced to a cover album and covering songs no one has ever heard of or likes.
 

Morrissey's left nut

I know it's over, so why doesn't Morrissey?
On pitchfork.com: Oh Ed Droste, Was This Morrissey Collaboration Really Worth It? BY: JAYSON GREENE
https://pitchfork.com/reviews/tracks/morrissey-morning-starship/

For every self-styled provocateur, there is an endpoint—when your pointed bons mots and “misunderstood” inflammatory statements fall on deaf ears. The stage is yours, but the rafters are empty. That moment has not quite yet arrived for Morrissey—after all, he recently sold out a string of Broadway shows—but he has always carried himself with the morose grandeur of a former titan grousing at the smallness of the pictures. His version of Roy Orbison’s “It’s Over,” the first single from the upcoming covers album California Son, found him in an uncharacteristically shaky voice, perhaps quaking in the shadow of one of the greatest vocalists of all time.

The second single is “Morning Starship,” a cover of the 1973 glam-rock songfrom Bruce Wayne Campbell, aka Jobriath. Morrissey is in sturdier shape, but his delivery is missing all of its bite—it sounds dispiritingly like a man at a karaoke bar giving his best Morrissey impression. Grizzly Bear’s Ed Droste is here, somewhere, doing... something—perhaps that is him, singing backing “oh” vocals, millions of miles in the distance in the mix. The arrangement, pumped full of electric guitar leads, drifts from the faux-Bowie stage setting of the original into generic Any-Rock territory. No matter how many dispiriting or alarming news items Morrissey might be generating as of late, you can usually count on him to muster a sense of occasion when he steps into a recording booth. This is Morrissey Minus Morrissey—the voice is there, but the presence has been leached out.
I don't know why these gimps are killing (thumbs down) the messenger. You didn't write the article.

Also I found Sam's album cover making site. Very professional. :lbf:
http://www.online-image-editor.com
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
Voice sounds alright, but it’s all just too overproduced. Morrissey’s recent “everything but the kitchen sink” approach in the studio detracts from what usually works best for him: straightforwardly playing with a four or five piece band.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
La la la sing a long is fine by me not that I really listen to his music since about 15 years or more ago but maybe in 2021 I will listen to it and shake my head under the swedish sun.

I am only here cause Morrissey is a football hooligan at heart.
 
B

Butterfly me to the moon.

Guest
:rock: I can not wait for California Son. These singles have been amazing so far. :guitar:
 
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Anonymous

Guest
It's not bad but nothing special. I think the orchestration is too overblown and a bit jarring. Also his lisp is noticable and lyrics don't suit him. Apart from that it's the greatest thing he's ever done.
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
...s'funny; but this was the cover í was both most looking forward to, and most nervous of.

it's the 'California Son' track that í am most intimately connected to, having adored the original, ever since my initiation on the Moz/NME 'Songs to Save Your Life' CD back in That Second Summer of Moz of 2004.

Morrissey has a far superior voice to Jobriath, and sings his song quite beautifully. The band and Chiccarelli's musical mise-en-scéne is deeply lovely, thrilling and buoyantly joyous {í particularly enjoyed the 'Ashes to Ashes' keyboard pads ~ a knowing nudge & wink to Bowie's Pierrot homagge to Jobriath in the video?}

But, í am afraid that it just can't touch the original: Jobriath's track was slyly and sneeringly sexy, with a sliver of sadness beneath. Morrissey's rendering is a tad more romantic and...chaste?
One almost feels that Morrissey is too respectful of the original, never quite having the heart (or balls) to reach it's heights (or depths).

But, early days friends; only listened a dozen or so times.

For now then, the next time that í feel that need for a searing/sweet ode to tumescence í shall be reaching for my tried and trueheart...Jobriath.

'Boom Boom Boom' indeed :yum:

ps ~ í would cut off my morning starship to hear M. take on Jobriath's "Inside" :hearteyes:


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