Low In High School: What do you think of it?

Imbrie

Junior Member
Can I just say this. I don't want to exaggerate, but my initial impressions are that this may be the worst album I've heard by any music act, ever. I'm struggling to think of another album by any artist that left such a horrible aftertaste. In that sense, it's an achievement, to bring about that level of revulsion in a person. But lyrically and musically his career is dead, as is his legacy.

Even Charles Manson's pre-incarceration demos were less appalling than this album. There is no hope to the lyrics at all, and it's not that it's bleak in a way which could still have some merit, it's just turgid. It's artistically non-existent. There are more entertaining YouTube comments than this; teenage edgelords on 4chan have more insightful opinions to offer.

'Israel' is, lyrically, a career low-point, possibly the lowest. 'When You Open Your Legs' is listless, and the rest of the track listing reads like a list of the musically lifeless. 'All the Young People' is an insult. It really calls into question the whole notion of the 'career musician'. Especially those who achieved some level of financial success early on, and also the online media's continued coverage of such figures even after the quality of their recorded output has gone off the cliff edge. To be a career musician is no better than being a career politician.

Would you go and see Messi and Ronaldo play at 58 years old? Or Federer lugging himself around the tennis court while approaching 60? I don't see why this should be any different; increasingly so, with the evidence presented to us on this LP. And I'm not comparing Morrissey to Messi or Ronaldo either, he was never in that league, and after 'Low in High School' he'd be lucky to make the Accrington Stanley subs bench. He's the musical equivalent of Southampton's Ali Dia. Some public figures in certain fields of the arts and entertainment only improve with age, but Mr. Morrissey I'm sorry to say is not among them.

There are touring singer-songwriters playing in sparsely populated dive bars in Berlin tonight, and Amsterdam, barely making ends meet but with so much more to say than this malcontent sitting on his $30 million fortune and subjecting his listener base to half-arsed albums like this. Quarter-arsed. It's an embarrassment to everyone involved -- the listeners, the band, the record label, the production and mixing crews -- through no fault of their own in most cases.

But those within the inner circle who allowed this record to be made without once speaking out and questioning its direction, or its purpose for existing, are entirely complicit. They are cowards and enablers, and Korda Marshall has egg on his face. His cheeks should be burning so red that his dripping facial egg could find itself suddenly poached in seconds from the heat being emitted.

Typically I would give it a second listen to see if my opinions shift as the songs grow more familiar, but the thought of doing so with this particular album makes me feel nauseated. I'm afraid there are no words in the modern English language which could strongly enough express the utter contempt that I feel for what he has committed to record here. It is an attack, an aural and intellectual assault on the listener, nothing less.

Imagine how far-gone you'd have to be even to consider releasing something like this to the public. Edmund Kemper would have more sense than to release this album. With a severed head in one hand and LiHS in the other, he'd be more likely to bury the master tapes of LiHS in his back garden than the head, deeming this album to be the more incriminating and reputation-destroying of the two if found in his possession.

The only people who I could imagine loving this album are hardline Zionists, considering its themes, but even they'd have reasonable questions about its quality.

As fradulent as 'Punk' turned out to be in the end, at least it appeared to be successful - temporarily at least - in pushing out the hackneyed old guard and ushering in an exciting new wave who had something to convey in that moment which needed to be said and heard.
The only regrettable thing today is that there's not another wave of exasperated confrontational youths who'll come along and clear out the deadwood Morrisseys of this world who, like a bad case of the clap, just won't go away.

After his 35 year marathon career he's now hobbling toward the finish line...

While Morrissey is unlikely to trouble the charts with this clunker, the collapse of the music industry is partially responsible for his longevity. No longer can worn out old musicians just be swept aside in favour of the new, as the internet ensures their continued seat at the table. This is true even for somebody with Morrissey's 'comment history'.

Familiarity comes first for record companies as it's a safer bet for them to invest in than in the new and unusual which may not make any dent culturally and brings in poor returns.
This is where the loathsome idea of the 'career musician' rears its Moz-shaped head again.

The Morrissey who exists today would have been less likely to survive in the music business of 30 years ago if he behaved then as he does now when their monopoly was still immutable, and options were limitless, they could afford to dispense with an act like Morrissey whose harmful presence on their label would outweigh and diminish any marginal profits from average sales figures.

They could afford to cut him loose, especially if the sales were lagging far behind those of the true stars on the roster, and he was bringing more baggage and trouble than he's worth. He's signed today on name recognition alone, the artistry left the equation a long time ago.

Once upon a time he'd be locked up like the Marquis de Sade for releasing something so grotesquely inartistic for public consumption, because obviously you'd have to be completely barmy to put your name on such a thing. You don't see me putting my name to this post do you? :crazy:

He would have been laughed at by children on every public square and had tomatoes chucked at him.

He'd also be lampooned in every colonial periodical informing the European diaspora of the goings-on in the Arts world. His name would be irrevocably linked with the likes of William McGonagle. His name would be a contemporaneous, and with time, historical punchline (and it is, and will be, but he would be laughed out of the public sphere entirely in his lifetime and wouldn't dare ever again show his face, not without a fake moustache and name change anyway. In modern times the name 'Morrissey' should be spoken of in the same breath as 'Tania Head'.)

Morrissey is the Andrew Dice Clay of the music world...

At least the works of the Marquis de Sade managed to achieve some sort of posthumous re-evaluation. This album isn't destined for a similarly generous fate , it will be confined to the dustbin of history forever, where it belongs. But in truth it never should have existed in the first place.

Some closing bullet-point observations.
  • In 'Low in High School' Morrissey is the bully in the school bathrooms shoving your head into the toilet and stealing your lunch money (the lunch money being the price of the album, the toilet being the album itself).
  • 'Low in High School' picks up where Lou Reed's 'Metal Machine Music' left off but somehow with fewer sentiments of real value to contribute.
  • While low in Morrissey's 'high school' the unsuspecting listener is grabbed and devoured, and finds that it's blacker than ever before almost as if they're trapped in the belly of the humpback whale being chased by gunships from Bergen. While neither Morrissey nor the whale 'give in', in the whale's case it's an act of defiance, whereas in Morrissey's it's a pathetic display that he refuses to just accept that the gig is well and truly up.
  • 'Low in High School' should be investigated by human rights organisations for the cruel and unusual punishment it inflicts upon its listeners.
  • On the school theme: in 'Low in High School' you watch the album's minutes and seconds slowly pass by -- 25:45...25:46...25:47...25:47 (??)..25:46(!!??) -- like all those late rainy afternoons sitting in math(...maths...LOL!) class, watching the clock, with time passing so slowly that it seems to stop, or for a split second the hand you're watching appears to edge slightly backwards.
  • Listening to 'Low in High School' is the musical equivalent of receiving 'lines' to write as punishment in 'high school', in this instance writing out 'this must be punishment for something I did in a past life' repeatedly for 50 minutes (the album's length).
  • Waking up on Christmas morning and finding 'Low in High School' in your stocking is only a slightly better prospect than waking up on Christmas morning and finding Santa Claus dead on your living room floor.
  • On 'Low in High School' the aural 'high school' in question is Columbine.
  • Referring back to Charles Manson from earlier, upon arriving home after a long day at work I'd rather pull into the driveway and find 'pig' written in blood on my front door than find a package waiting for me in my mailbox with 'Low in High School' contained inside it.
  • "There are no words in the modern English language...." but I gave it a shot, however I'll stop here because I don't want to start exaggerating (re: my initial impressions) about how atrocious this album is.
  • 'Low in High School' is aural syphilis!
Regards (sorry to everyone here who waited patiently for November 17th, some of you with anticipation, and all you got for your trouble and pain was this album which gives a glimpse into the mind of somebody deranged(?))
MOZAMBIGUOUS

P.S. While I write this I've been listening to the radio show 'Mystery Train' online which plays some great stuff. Not all is lost -- I needed to hear something like this to cleanse my soul and 'shake the disease' after my encounter with the oozing black bile of 'Low in High School'. The clouds are beginning to part again. 'Low in High School' contrives to frighten you. It wishes to pull you into its murky depths like the Creature from the Black Lagoon and be your 'friend' forever (forever). Morrissey's 'high school' is actually a cellar, and Morrissey as its principal takes off his mask to reveal a flickering Josef Fritzl-like face and a whole other cast of demonic characters on a kaleidoscopic daguerrotype underneath. He's not the man you thought he was. Avoid. Little lamb, run as fast as you can away from this terrible creation (never giving in), I beseech you, and don't look back.
TL;DR it's shite, although without 'Israel' and 'I Bury the Living' on the tracklist I might have permitted myself to go a touch easier on the old sod, LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLO!!

Get some rest, old son.
 

A Mans Man

A Mans Man
Firstly, personally I am very happy Morrissey is still around and offering an alternative to all the heavily marketed pop rubbish we are force fed. He still has a unique voice with something to say and I like that he is not trying to recapture his successes of the past by making carbon copies of V&I etc..so many people just want The Smiths / Johnny Marr back and they need to get over it and enjoy Moz in the now rather than hankering after a past that exists only in there head i.e Fat Auntie...Moz is not the same person he was 30 years ago or even 5 years ago and I wish people would stop criticising him for moving on or doing something different...open you minds....move with the times...you might surprise yourself...

On first listen I really like the album (generally I can always find something I like about a Moz album Southpaw Grammar being my personal favourite); the only mild disappointment so far is the muted production of ATYPMFIL as I preferred the live version...HIA? can comfortably sit alongside the best of his solo output...WYOYL is really good also...lot of interesting sounds and multi layered instrumentation, will get much better and more cohesive with each listen I am sure....IBTL lyrics are slightly jarring and I can understand why people who lost family members in wars may feel offended but Moz's right to free speech I guess..

MLIDAFY - 8/10
IWYL - 9/10
JOHWSUOS - 8/10
HIAQ - 10/10
STDIB - 7/10
IBTL - 6/10
IYL - 6/10
TGFTAWWK - 7/10
ATYPMFIL - 7/10
WYOYL - 8/10
WWPUFTP - 8/10
ISRAEL - 7/10

Overall easily a 7-8 out of 10 album, people are welcome to their views but my view would be that scores below this are based on personal agendas with Moz, his politics or just general personality disorders..
 

George the 23rd

Still-Mostly-Mute Witness
The Girl From Tel Aviv. Really light and airy and alongside of In Your Lap has the type of 1-2 punch of Used To be A Sweet Boy and Lazy Sunbathers on 'Vauxhall.'
Agree with the rest of your post but can't think of a more ill-fitting comparison tbh. In Your Lap is growing on me, but having two five minute piano-led ballads on the Middle East consecutively is the one mistake with the tracklisting IMO.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Can I just say this. I don't want to exaggerate, but my initial impressions are that this may be the worst album I've heard by any music act, ever. I'm struggling to think of another album by any artist that left such a horrible aftertaste. In that sense, it's an achievement, to bring about that level of revulsion in a person. But lyrically and musically his career is dead, as is his legacy.

Even Charles Manson's pre-incarceration demos were less appalling than this album. There is no hope to the lyrics at all, and it's not that it's bleak in a way which could still have some merit, it's just turgid. It's artistically non-existent. There are more entertaining YouTube comments than this; teenage edgelords on 4chan have more insightful opinions to offer.

'Israel' is, lyrically, a career low-point, possibly the lowest. 'When You Open Your Legs' is listless, and the rest of the track listing reads like a list of the musically lifeless. 'All the Young People' is an insult. It really calls into question the whole notion of the 'career musician'. Especially those who achieved some level of financial success early on, and also the online media's continued coverage of such figures even after the quality of their recorded output has gone off the cliff edge. To be a career musician is no better than being a career politician.

Would you go and see Messi and Ronaldo play at 58 years old? Or Federer lugging himself around the tennis court while approaching 60? I don't see why this should be any different; increasingly so, with the evidence presented to us on this LP. And I'm not comparing Morrissey to Messi or Ronaldo either, he was never in that league, and after 'Low in High School' he'd be lucky to make the Accrington Stanley subs bench. He's the musical equivalent of Southampton's Ali Dia. Some public figures in certain fields of the arts and entertainment only improve with age, but Mr. Morrissey I'm sorry to say is not among them.

There are touring singer-songwriters playing in sparsely populated dive bars in Berlin tonight, and Amsterdam, barely making ends meet but with so much more to say than this malcontent sitting on his $30 million fortune and subjecting his listener base to half-arsed albums like this. Quarter-arsed. It's an embarrassment to everyone involved -- the listeners, the band, the record label, the production and mixing crews -- through no fault of their own in most cases.

But those within the inner circle who allowed this record to be made without once speaking out and questioning its direction, or its purpose for existing, are entirely complicit. They are cowards and enablers, and Korda Marshall has egg on his face. His cheeks should be burning so red that his dripping facial egg could find itself suddenly poached in seconds from the heat being emitted.

Typically I would give it a second listen to see if my opinions shift as the songs grow more familiar, but the thought of doing so with this particular album makes me feel nauseated. I'm afraid there are no words in the modern English language which could strongly enough express the utter contempt that I feel for what he has committed to record here. It is an attack, an aural and intellectual assault on the listener, nothing less.

Imagine how far-gone you'd have to be even to consider releasing something like this to the public. Edmund Kemper would have more sense than to release this album. With a severed head in one hand and LiHS in the other, he'd be more likely to bury the master tapes of LiHS in his back garden than the head, deeming this album to be the more incriminating and reputation-destroying of the two if found in his possession.

The only people who I could imagine loving this album are hardline Zionists, considering its themes, but even they'd have reasonable questions about its quality.

As fradulent as 'Punk' turned out to be in the end, at least it appeared to be successful - temporarily at least - in pushing out the hackneyed old guard and ushering in an exciting new wave who had something to convey in that moment which needed to be said and heard.
The only regrettable thing today is that there's not another wave of exasperated confrontational youths who'll come along and clear out the deadwood Morrisseys of this world who, like a bad case of the clap, just won't go away.

After his 35 year marathon career he's now hobbling toward the finish line...

While Morrissey is unlikely to trouble the charts with this clunker, the collapse of the music industry is partially responsible for his longevity. No longer can worn out old musicians just be swept aside in favour of the new, as the internet ensures their continued seat at the table. This is true even for somebody with Morrissey's 'comment history'.

Familiarity comes first for record companies as it's a safer bet for them to invest in than in the new and unusual which may not make any dent culturally and brings in poor returns.
This is where the loathsome idea of the 'career musician' rears its Moz-shaped head again.

The Morrissey who exists today would have been less likely to survive in the music business of 30 years ago if he behaved then as he does now when their monopoly was still immutable, and options were limitless, they could afford to dispense with an act like Morrissey whose harmful presence on their label would outweigh and diminish any marginal profits from average sales figures.

They could afford to cut him loose, especially if the sales were lagging far behind those of the true stars on the roster, and he was bringing more baggage and trouble than he's worth. He's signed today on name recognition alone, the artistry left the equation a long time ago.

Once upon a time he'd be locked up like the Marquis de Sade for releasing something so grotesquely inartistic for public consumption, because obviously you'd have to be completely barmy to put your name on such a thing. You don't see me putting my name to this post do you? :crazy:

He would have been laughed at by children on every public square and had tomatoes chucked at him.

He'd also be lampooned in every colonial periodical informing the European diaspora of the goings-on in the Arts world. His name would be irrevocably linked with the likes of William McGonagle. His name would be a contemporaneous, and with time, historical punchline (and it is, and will be, but he would be laughed out of the public sphere entirely in his lifetime and wouldn't dare ever again show his face, not without a fake moustache and name change anyway. In modern times the name 'Morrissey' should be spoken of in the same breath as 'Tania Head'.)

Morrissey is the Andrew Dice Clay of the music world...

At least the works of the Marquis de Sade managed to achieve some sort of posthumous re-evaluation. This album isn't destined for a similarly generous fate , it will be confined to the dustbin of history forever, where it belongs. But in truth it never should have existed in the first place.

Some closing bullet-point observations.
  • In 'Low in High School' Morrissey is the bully in the school bathrooms shoving your head into the toilet and stealing your lunch money (the lunch money being the price of the album, the toilet being the album itself).
  • 'Low in High School' picks up where Lou Reed's 'Metal Machine Music' left off but somehow with fewer sentiments of real value to contribute.
  • While low in Morrissey's 'high school' the unsuspecting listener is grabbed and devoured, and finds that it's blacker than ever before almost as if they're trapped in the belly of the humpback whale being chased by gunships from Bergen. While neither Morrissey nor the whale 'give in', in the whale's case it's an act of defiance, whereas in Morrissey's it's a pathetic display that he refuses to just accept that the gig is well and truly up.
  • 'Low in High School' should be investigated by human rights organisations for the cruel and unusual punishment it inflicts upon its listeners.
  • On the school theme: in 'Low in High School' you watch the album's minutes and seconds slowly pass by -- 25:45...25:46...25:47...25:47 (??)..25:46(!!??) -- like all those late rainy afternoons sitting in math(...maths...LOL!) class, watching the clock, with time passing so slowly that it seems to stop, or for a split second the hand you're watching appears to edge slightly backwards.
  • Listening to 'Low in High School' is the musical equivalent of receiving 'lines' to write as punishment in 'high school', in this instance writing out 'this must be punishment for something I did in a past life' repeatedly for 50 minutes (the album's length).
  • Waking up on Christmas morning and finding 'Low in High School' in your stocking is only a slightly better prospect than waking up on Christmas morning and finding Santa Claus dead on your living room floor.
  • On 'Low in High School' the aural 'high school' in question is Columbine.
  • Referring back to Charles Manson from earlier, upon arriving home after a long day at work I'd rather pull into the driveway and find 'pig' written in blood on my front door than find a package waiting for me in my mailbox with 'Low in High School' contained inside it.
  • "There are no words in the modern English language...." but I gave it a shot, however I'll stop here because I don't want to start exaggerating (re: my initial impressions) about how atrocious this album is.
  • 'Low in High School' is aural syphilis!
Regards (sorry to everyone here who waited patiently for November 17th, some of you with anticipation, and all you got for your trouble and pain was this album which gives a glimpse into the mind of somebody deranged(?))
MOZAMBIGUOUS

P.S. While I write this I've been listening to the radio show 'Mystery Train' online which plays some great stuff. Not all is lost -- I needed to hear something like this to cleanse my soul and 'shake the disease' after my encounter with the oozing black bile of 'Low in High School'. The clouds are beginning to part again. 'Low in High School' contrives to frighten you. It wishes to pull you into its murky depths like the Creature from the Black Lagoon and be your 'friend' forever (forever). Morrissey's 'high school' is actually a cellar, and Morrissey as its principal takes off his mask to reveal a flickering Josef Fritzl-like face and a whole other cast of demonic characters on a kaleidoscopic daguerrotype underneath. He's not the man you thought he was. Avoid. Little lamb, run as fast as you can away from this terrible creation (never giving in), I beseech you, and don't look back.
TL;DR it's shite, although without 'Israel' and 'I Bury the Living' on the tracklist I might have permitted myself to go a touch easier on the old sod, LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLO!!
What worse than Alvin & The Chipmunks sing the songs of Celine Dion?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Can I just say this. I don't want to exaggerate, but my initial impressions are that this may be the worst album I've heard by any music act, ever. I'm struggling to think of another album by any artist that left such a horrible aftertaste. In that sense, it's an achievement, to bring about that level of revulsion in a person. But lyrically and musically his career is dead, as is his legacy.

Even Charles Manson's pre-incarceration demos were less appalling than this album. There is no hope to the lyrics at all, and it's not that it's bleak in a way which could still have some merit, it's just turgid. It's artistically non-existent. There are more entertaining YouTube comments than this; teenage edgelords on 4chan have more insightful opinions to offer.

'Israel' is, lyrically, a career low-point, possibly the lowest. 'When You Open Your Legs' is listless, and the rest of the track listing reads like a list of the musically lifeless. 'All the Young People' is an insult. It really calls into question the whole notion of the 'career musician'. Especially those who achieved some level of financial success early on, and also the online media's continued coverage of such figures even after the quality of their recorded output has gone off the cliff edge. To be a career musician is no better than being a career politician.

Would you go and see Messi and Ronaldo play at 58 years old? Or Federer lugging himself around the tennis court while approaching 60? I don't see why this should be any different; increasingly so, with the evidence presented to us on this LP. And I'm not comparing Morrissey to Messi or Ronaldo either, he was never in that league, and after 'Low in High School' he'd be lucky to make the Accrington Stanley subs bench. He's the musical equivalent of Southampton's Ali Dia. Some public figures in certain fields of the arts and entertainment only improve with age, but Mr. Morrissey I'm sorry to say is not among them.

There are touring singer-songwriters playing in sparsely populated dive bars in Berlin tonight, and Amsterdam, barely making ends meet but with so much more to say than this malcontent sitting on his $30 million fortune and subjecting his listener base to half-arsed albums like this. Quarter-arsed. It's an embarrassment to everyone involved -- the listeners, the band, the record label, the production and mixing crews -- through no fault of their own in most cases.

But those within the inner circle who allowed this record to be made without once speaking out and questioning its direction, or its purpose for existing, are entirely complicit. They are cowards and enablers, and Korda Marshall has egg on his face. His cheeks should be burning so red that his dripping facial egg could find itself suddenly poached in seconds from the heat being emitted.

Typically I would give it a second listen to see if my opinions shift as the songs grow more familiar, but the thought of doing so with this particular album makes me feel nauseated. I'm afraid there are no words in the modern English language which could strongly enough express the utter contempt that I feel for what he has committed to record here. It is an attack, an aural and intellectual assault on the listener, nothing less.

Imagine how far-gone you'd have to be even to consider releasing something like this to the public. Edmund Kemper would have more sense than to release this album. With a severed head in one hand and LiHS in the other, he'd be more likely to bury the master tapes of LiHS in his back garden than the head, deeming this album to be the more incriminating and reputation-destroying of the two if found in his possession.

The only people who I could imagine loving this album are hardline Zionists, considering its themes, but even they'd have reasonable questions about its quality.

As fradulent as 'Punk' turned out to be in the end, at least it appeared to be successful - temporarily at least - in pushing out the hackneyed old guard and ushering in an exciting new wave who had something to convey in that moment which needed to be said and heard.
The only regrettable thing today is that there's not another wave of exasperated confrontational youths who'll come along and clear out the deadwood Morrisseys of this world who, like a bad case of the clap, just won't go away.

After his 35 year marathon career he's now hobbling toward the finish line...

While Morrissey is unlikely to trouble the charts with this clunker, the collapse of the music industry is partially responsible for his longevity. No longer can worn out old musicians just be swept aside in favour of the new, as the internet ensures their continued seat at the table. This is true even for somebody with Morrissey's 'comment history'.

Familiarity comes first for record companies as it's a safer bet for them to invest in than in the new and unusual which may not make any dent culturally and brings in poor returns.
This is where the loathsome idea of the 'career musician' rears its Moz-shaped head again.

The Morrissey who exists today would have been less likely to survive in the music business of 30 years ago if he behaved then as he does now when their monopoly was still immutable, and options were limitless, they could afford to dispense with an act like Morrissey whose harmful presence on their label would outweigh and diminish any marginal profits from average sales figures.

They could afford to cut him loose, especially if the sales were lagging far behind those of the true stars on the roster, and he was bringing more baggage and trouble than he's worth. He's signed today on name recognition alone, the artistry left the equation a long time ago.

Once upon a time he'd be locked up like the Marquis de Sade for releasing something so grotesquely inartistic for public consumption, because obviously you'd have to be completely barmy to put your name on such a thing. You don't see me putting my name to this post do you? :crazy:

He would have been laughed at by children on every public square and had tomatoes chucked at him.

He'd also be lampooned in every colonial periodical informing the European diaspora of the goings-on in the Arts world. His name would be irrevocably linked with the likes of William McGonagle. His name would be a contemporaneous, and with time, historical punchline (and it is, and will be, but he would be laughed out of the public sphere entirely in his lifetime and wouldn't dare ever again show his face, not without a fake moustache and name change anyway. In modern times the name 'Morrissey' should be spoken of in the same breath as 'Tania Head'.)

Morrissey is the Andrew Dice Clay of the music world...

At least the works of the Marquis de Sade managed to achieve some sort of posthumous re-evaluation. This album isn't destined for a similarly generous fate , it will be confined to the dustbin of history forever, where it belongs. But in truth it never should have existed in the first place.

Some closing bullet-point observations.
  • In 'Low in High School' Morrissey is the bully in the school bathrooms shoving your head into the toilet and stealing your lunch money (the lunch money being the price of the album, the toilet being the album itself).
  • 'Low in High School' picks up where Lou Reed's 'Metal Machine Music' left off but somehow with fewer sentiments of real value to contribute.
  • While low in Morrissey's 'high school' the unsuspecting listener is grabbed and devoured, and finds that it's blacker than ever before almost as if they're trapped in the belly of the humpback whale being chased by gunships from Bergen. While neither Morrissey nor the whale 'give in', in the whale's case it's an act of defiance, whereas in Morrissey's it's a pathetic display that he refuses to just accept that the gig is well and truly up.
  • 'Low in High School' should be investigated by human rights organisations for the cruel and unusual punishment it inflicts upon its listeners.
  • On the school theme: in 'Low in High School' you watch the album's minutes and seconds slowly pass by -- 25:45...25:46...25:47...25:47 (??)..25:46(!!??) -- like all those late rainy afternoons sitting in math(...maths...LOL!) class, watching the clock, with time passing so slowly that it seems to stop, or for a split second the hand you're watching appears to edge slightly backwards.
  • Listening to 'Low in High School' is the musical equivalent of receiving 'lines' to write as punishment in 'high school', in this instance writing out 'this must be punishment for something I did in a past life' repeatedly for 50 minutes (the album's length).
  • Waking up on Christmas morning and finding 'Low in High School' in your stocking is only a slightly better prospect than waking up on Christmas morning and finding Santa Claus dead on your living room floor.
  • On 'Low in High School' the aural 'high school' in question is Columbine.
  • Referring back to Charles Manson from earlier, upon arriving home after a long day at work I'd rather pull into the driveway and find 'pig' written in blood on my front door than find a package waiting for me in my mailbox with 'Low in High School' contained inside it.
  • "There are no words in the modern English language...." but I gave it a shot, however I'll stop here because I don't want to start exaggerating (re: my initial impressions) about how atrocious this album is.
  • 'Low in High School' is aural syphilis!
Regards (sorry to everyone here who waited patiently for November 17th, some of you with anticipation, and all you got for your trouble and pain was this album which gives a glimpse into the mind of somebody deranged(?))
MOZAMBIGUOUS

P.S. While I write this I've been listening to the radio show 'Mystery Train' online which plays some great stuff. Not all is lost -- I needed to hear something like this to cleanse my soul and 'shake the disease' after my encounter with the oozing black bile of 'Low in High School'. The clouds are beginning to part again. 'Low in High School' contrives to frighten you. It wishes to pull you into its murky depths like the Creature from the Black Lagoon and be your 'friend' forever (forever). Morrissey's 'high school' is actually a cellar, and Morrissey as its principal takes off his mask to reveal a flickering Josef Fritzl-like face and a whole other cast of demonic characters on a kaleidoscopic daguerrotype underneath. He's not the man you thought he was. Avoid. Little lamb, run as fast as you can away from this terrible creation (never giving in), I beseech you, and don't look back.
TL;DR it's shite, although without 'Israel' and 'I Bury the Living' on the tracklist I might have permitted myself to go a touch easier on the old sod, LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLO!!
Can I just say this. I don't want to exaggerate, but my initial impressions are that this may be the longest post I've seen by any poster, ever.
 

Flibberty

Well-Known Member
Too early to give a proper review of the album yet. Any album needs days rather than hours to be judged properly...

My initial thoughts though are pretty positive. Certainly not Morrissey's best album (which I wouldn't expect at this stage of his career), but certainly not his worst either. I would have preferred some more personal and introspective songs, but it is good to have him still making statements that go against the grain.

I don't have a problem with I Bury the Living, but I have no fondness for soldiers and certainly no love for the fact that they are considered "heroes" by some. The ending to the song is the best bit of the album imo. :)

All the Young People sounded better live imo...
 

stux

Loyal fan
I like the album a lot. Voice is sounding great, band sound great too. Musically I think it is a step forward and it good that he has 4 composers contributing.

What I dislike are the lyrics. I cannot relate to most of this album. Where is the wit? Where are the phrases that grab you? He used to have a way of wording things that only Morrissey could do. Cannot believe this is the same guys who wrote the lyrics in The Smiths.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I would have preferred some more personal and introspective songs
So you don't think this lyric is personal and introspective?

"I'd like to be rotted out just before I become aware of the pain
The more I wish in my heart for someone less likely they come"
 

Lionsy

Active Member
This is going to get lost, but, my opinions on all the tracks have changed since the first/second listen when it leaked, so for what it's worth!

My Love - 7/10 - Has really grown on me and is a fantastic opener along the lines of You're Gonna Need Someone On Your Side.
I wish You Lonely - 7/10 - A solid album track. Shouldn't have been a single.
Jacky's Only Happy - 8/10 - A solid album track. Shouldn't have been a single.
Home Is a Question Mark - 9/10 - One of the stand out songs on the album.
Spent The Day In Bed - 2/10 - Good first single choice, but I still don't like it. I thought I was going to hate the album when this came out, I'm glad it's one of the weakest songs on the album as a whole.
I Bury the Living - 3/10 - Ohhhh boy. I initially quite liked this song, but I'm left just not understanding what was going on in that studio that let this exist - The ending though is beautiful and I wish there was more like the ending on this album.
In Your Lap - 6/10 - This has grown on me a lot, just not sure I understand or care for the sentiment.
The Girl From Tel Aviv - 8/10 - I thought more people would like this, I thought it was great upon first listen and still really like the music.
All The Young People.. - 1/10 - Should have been cut after how it was brutalised in production, I want to think I'd feel differently about it had we not heard the fantastic live version - The live version is SO different that I'd like to think they felt the same way.
When You Open Your Legs - 2/10 - Throw away track.
Who Will Protect Us from the Police - 10/10 - Everything about this song is fantastic, I can't put my finger on it but it keeps reminding me of something Bowie would have put out a long time ago. I think this should have closed the album.
Israel - Still not a fan, I listened to it once more and still think it's awful and an awful close to the album, one of the worst closing songs on any of his albums.

7/10 Overall. The good tracks drag it up a lot, the bad tracks don't really seem to detract from the rest of the album very much, which is strange - I've made peace with All the Young People being shite on the album, because we have the wonderful BBC recording, I can forgive IBTL because of the ending and STDIB has to exist for being a good single.

I think it's less user friendly than WP, but BMG have done a far better job and (clearly) spent a lot of money on adverts and getting air play, I want to say it will do better than WP did in sales... it's also ten times better than WP - the fact that I have to quickly go and look at the tracks on WP to remember if there are any I still listen to suggests it was a bad album in retrospective.

Regarding the single choices, I think they had their hands tied behind their backs with this album, and I'm left wondering what else they would have picked other than HIAQM maybe? I don't know! Not a bad thing, just it's a tough album for singles.
 
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Life_Is_A_Pigsty

Gear Changer
I have only had half a dozen listens so far as I cannot afford to spend the day in bed and listen to it unfortunately. I must say, I am still suitably impressed with what I have heard, I mainly listened to the remaining 5 tracks which I hadn't heard live or otherwise.

I think it could be an improvement on World Peace which I did like, but where World Peace did have some great songs, it was quite patchy overall, I wouldn't say Low In High School is more immediate but I get the impression I will grow to love it more as a whole. The voice is rich and a delight on everything here, sometimes the lyrics can be questionable until I get my head around them anyway.

People still pine for the Morrissey of those 90's albums Kill Uncle, Southpaw and Maladjusted but I think World Peace and Low In High School are the better albums, and for every Earth Is The Loneliest Planet or Kick The Bride Down The Aisle, there is always a Found Found Found or a Papa Jack.

Having already been impressed by the 3 'singles', I have to add the opener My Love and in particular Israel which is fantastic, Home Is A Question Mark did not let me down after being so familiar with the live recording from the BBC, I find it one of his best songs since Now My Heart Is Full and the best track here so far.

When You Open Your Legs and Jacky were much better than the live versions but All The Young People is sadly lacking that jazzy piano on the studio cut, or it is there but buried quite deep, I'm sure I will get used to this but I kinda miss it already.

I find Morrissey's politics quite fascinating and this is his most politicised album to date, his politics don't really fit into any left or right box, he seems to like Nigel Farage and Jeremy Corbyn for example, hates Trump, liked Bernie Sanders but then has an interest in Brexit and UKIP, but let's not forget he never actually said he supports Le Pen or Anne Marie Waters.

But, anyway, this appears to be a very good album and at the moment it is looking like a top 5 in the solo discography for me.
 

Flibberty

Well-Known Member
So you don't think this lyric is personal and introspective?

"I'd like to be rotted out just before I become aware of the pain
The more I wish in my heart for someone less likely they come"
Where did I say that there was no introspection on the album? I didn't.

I said that I would like more and I stand by that.
 

SweetnTenderYorkshireman

Well-Known Member
First impressions.
I never expected another 'Vauxhall' or even a 'Quarry' so I went in with hopeful but cautious expectations.
The main gripe I have is like many have said, Morrissey writes best from the perspective of a character; either himself or otherwise, a lot of the songs on here are just statements of Morrissey's opinions, with no real arc or intrigue.
That said, my initial feelings are

1: "My Love..." - 8/10 Great opener! Similar to "YGNSOYS" from "Your Arsenal" would be a great opener for live shows

2: "I Wish You Lonely" 6/10 No real chorus, plods along but not awful

3: "Jacky's Only Happy..." - 8/10 Really like this one, moves away from the bogged down war theme, love the "EXIT! EXIT!" refrain

4: "Home Is A ?" 8/10 Decent cut, again another great tune NOT about politics, Morrisse's vocal really picking up towards the end

5: "Spent The Day..." 7/10 Grown on me a lot, a fun pop number like "Paris" or "Kiss Me A Lot"

6: "I Bury The Living" 5/10 The controversial one. Lyrically, it comes across quite cruel and blunt but I do think with more listens Ill get what Moz is saying, but it just goes on and on. The ending is great, reminds me of "The National Front Disco" with the Mothers perspective

7: "In Your Lap" 4/10 Need more listens, nothing grabbed me about it really.

8: "The Girl From Tel Aviv..." 6/10 Quite playful, lyrics once again bogged down by war/oil/ though I like the 'American way' piece

9: "All The Young People..." 6/10 Not bad, better live with a singalong vibe, nice barroom piano

10: "When You Open Your Legs..." 7/10 I like this one quite a bit, nice melody its just the title and the way it fits in the song I don't love

11: "Who Will Protect Us..." 8/10 Might be my favorite along with the opener, love the instruments, the lyrics arent amazing but the tone and vibe I love

12: "Isreal" 7/10 Decent ending, just more of the same as the rest of the LP, nice dramatic piano

Morrisseys voice is on top form, the band really firing up, it just seems Moz has unfortunately got a bee in his bonnett and most of the album is taken with songs about it.

Not disappointed, not blown away, it won't galvanise a huge new following but I think many fans will be happy.
 
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nitrate21

Member
Can I just say this. I don't want to exaggerate, but my initial impressions are that this may be the worst album I've heard by any music act, ever. I'm struggling to think of another album by any artist that left such a horrible aftertaste. In that sense, it's an achievement, to bring about that level of revulsion in a person. But lyrically and musically his career is dead, as is his legacy.

Even Charles Manson's pre-incarceration demos were less appalling than this album. There is no hope to the lyrics at all, and it's not that it's bleak in a way which could still have some merit, it's just turgid. It's artistically non-existent. There are more entertaining YouTube comments than this; teenage edgelords on 4chan have more insightful opinions to offer.

'Israel' is, lyrically, a career low-point, possibly the lowest. 'When You Open Your Legs' is listless, and the rest of the track listing reads like a list of the musically lifeless. 'All the Young People' is an insult. It really calls into question the whole notion of the 'career musician'. Especially those who achieved some level of financial success early on, and also the online media's continued coverage of such figures even after the quality of their recorded output has gone off the cliff edge. To be a career musician is no better than being a career politician.

Would you go and see Messi and Ronaldo play at 58 years old? Or Federer lugging himself around the tennis court while approaching 60? I don't see why this should be any different; increasingly so, with the evidence presented to us on this LP. And I'm not comparing Morrissey to Messi or Ronaldo either, he was never in that league, and after 'Low in High School' he'd be lucky to make the Accrington Stanley subs bench. He's the musical equivalent of Southampton's Ali Dia. Some public figures in certain fields of the arts and entertainment only improve with age, but Mr. Morrissey I'm sorry to say is not among them.

There are touring singer-songwriters playing in sparsely populated dive bars in Berlin tonight, and Amsterdam, barely making ends meet but with so much more to say than this malcontent sitting on his $30 million fortune and subjecting his listener base to half-arsed albums like this. Quarter-arsed. It's an embarrassment to everyone involved -- the listeners, the band, the record label, the production and mixing crews -- through no fault of their own in most cases.

But those within the inner circle who allowed this record to be made without once speaking out and questioning its direction, or its purpose for existing, are entirely complicit. They are cowards and enablers, and Korda Marshall has egg on his face. His cheeks should be burning so red that his dripping facial egg could find itself suddenly poached in seconds from the heat being emitted.

Typically I would give it a second listen to see if my opinions shift as the songs grow more familiar, but the thought of doing so with this particular album makes me feel nauseated. I'm afraid there are no words in the modern English language which could strongly enough express the utter contempt that I feel for what he has committed to record here. It is an attack, an aural and intellectual assault on the listener, nothing less.

Imagine how far-gone you'd have to be even to consider releasing something like this to the public. Edmund Kemper would have more sense than to release this album. With a severed head in one hand and LiHS in the other, he'd be more likely to bury the master tapes of LiHS in his back garden than the head, deeming this album to be the more incriminating and reputation-destroying of the two if found in his possession.

The only people who I could imagine loving this album are hardline Zionists, considering its themes, but even they'd have reasonable questions about its quality.

As fradulent as 'Punk' turned out to be in the end, at least it appeared to be successful - temporarily at least - in pushing out the hackneyed old guard and ushering in an exciting new wave who had something to convey in that moment which needed to be said and heard.
The only regrettable thing today is that there's not another wave of exasperated confrontational youths who'll come along and clear out the deadwood Morrisseys of this world who, like a bad case of the clap, just won't go away.

After his 35 year marathon career he's now hobbling toward the finish line...

While Morrissey is unlikely to trouble the charts with this clunker, the collapse of the music industry is partially responsible for his longevity. No longer can worn out old musicians just be swept aside in favour of the new, as the internet ensures their continued seat at the table. This is true even for somebody with Morrissey's 'comment history'.

Familiarity comes first for record companies as it's a safer bet for them to invest in than in the new and unusual which may not make any dent culturally and brings in poor returns.
This is where the loathsome idea of the 'career musician' rears its Moz-shaped head again.

The Morrissey who exists today would have been less likely to survive in the music business of 30 years ago if he behaved then as he does now when their monopoly was still immutable, and options were limitless, they could afford to dispense with an act like Morrissey whose harmful presence on their label would outweigh and diminish any marginal profits from average sales figures.

They could afford to cut him loose, especially if the sales were lagging far behind those of the true stars on the roster, and he was bringing more baggage and trouble than he's worth. He's signed today on name recognition alone, the artistry left the equation a long time ago.

Once upon a time he'd be locked up like the Marquis de Sade for releasing something so grotesquely inartistic for public consumption, because obviously you'd have to be completely barmy to put your name on such a thing. You don't see me putting my name to this post do you? :crazy:

He would have been laughed at by children on every public square and had tomatoes chucked at him.

He'd also be lampooned in every colonial periodical informing the European diaspora of the goings-on in the Arts world. His name would be irrevocably linked with the likes of William McGonagle. His name would be a contemporaneous, and with time, historical punchline (and it is, and will be, but he would be laughed out of the public sphere entirely in his lifetime and wouldn't dare ever again show his face, not without a fake moustache and name change anyway. In modern times the name 'Morrissey' should be spoken of in the same breath as 'Tania Head'.)

Morrissey is the Andrew Dice Clay of the music world...

At least the works of the Marquis de Sade managed to achieve some sort of posthumous re-evaluation. This album isn't destined for a similarly generous fate , it will be confined to the dustbin of history forever, where it belongs. But in truth it never should have existed in the first place.

Some closing bullet-point observations.
  • In 'Low in High School' Morrissey is the bully in the school bathrooms shoving your head into the toilet and stealing your lunch money (the lunch money being the price of the album, the toilet being the album itself).
  • 'Low in High School' picks up where Lou Reed's 'Metal Machine Music' left off but somehow with fewer sentiments of real value to contribute.
  • While low in Morrissey's 'high school' the unsuspecting listener is grabbed and devoured, and finds that it's blacker than ever before almost as if they're trapped in the belly of the humpback whale being chased by gunships from Bergen. While neither Morrissey nor the whale 'give in', in the whale's case it's an act of defiance, whereas in Morrissey's it's a pathetic display that he refuses to just accept that the gig is well and truly up.
  • 'Low in High School' should be investigated by human rights organisations for the cruel and unusual punishment it inflicts upon its listeners.
  • On the school theme: in 'Low in High School' you watch the album's minutes and seconds slowly pass by -- 25:45...25:46...25:47...25:47 (??)..25:46(!!??) -- like all those late rainy afternoons sitting in math(...maths...LOL!) class, watching the clock, with time passing so slowly that it seems to stop, or for a split second the hand you're watching appears to edge slightly backwards.
  • Listening to 'Low in High School' is the musical equivalent of receiving 'lines' to write as punishment in 'high school', in this instance writing out 'this must be punishment for something I did in a past life' repeatedly for 50 minutes (the album's length).
  • Waking up on Christmas morning and finding 'Low in High School' in your stocking is only a slightly better prospect than waking up on Christmas morning and finding Santa Claus dead on your living room floor.
  • On 'Low in High School' the aural 'high school' in question is Columbine.
  • Referring back to Charles Manson from earlier, upon arriving home after a long day at work I'd rather pull into the driveway and find 'pig' written in blood on my front door than find a package waiting for me in my mailbox with 'Low in High School' contained inside it.
  • "There are no words in the modern English language...." but I gave it a shot, however I'll stop here because I don't want to start exaggerating (re: my initial impressions) about how atrocious this album is.
  • 'Low in High School' is aural syphilis!
Regards (sorry to everyone here who waited patiently for November 17th, some of you with anticipation, and all you got for your trouble and pain was this album which gives a glimpse into the mind of somebody deranged(?))
MOZAMBIGUOUS

P.S. While I write this I've been listening to the radio show 'Mystery Train' online which plays some great stuff. Not all is lost -- I needed to hear something like this to cleanse my soul and 'shake the disease' after my encounter with the oozing black bile of 'Low in High School'. The clouds are beginning to part again. 'Low in High School' contrives to frighten you. It wishes to pull you into its murky depths like the Creature from the Black Lagoon and be your 'friend' forever (forever). Morrissey's 'high school' is actually a cellar, and Morrissey as its principal takes off his mask to reveal a flickering Josef Fritzl-like face and a whole other cast of demonic characters on a kaleidoscopic daguerrotype underneath. He's not the man you thought he was. Avoid. Little lamb, run as fast as you can away from this terrible creation (never giving in), I beseech you, and don't look back.
TL;DR it's shite, although without 'Israel' and 'I Bury the Living' on the tracklist I might have permitted myself to go a touch easier on the old sod, LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLO!!
So many words and not a damn thing said.
 

bandrus1

Active Member
Just did my first listen... I enjoy it.... as many have said, the subject matter is no longer great. We are bombarded daily with social commentary and sadly we get Morrissey doing it also. With that said I actually enjoyed it very much and unlike the last 2 releases the band actually sounds great and it is the lyrical content that lags. His voice is absolutely incredible right now.

Home is a question mark is an all time great.

6/10 and a very nice record
 

Vegan

Well-Known Member
To longtimers here...this is my first experience here when a new album drops. Is it always this polarizing or is this unique? I'm still digesting the album. Too soon to give a verdict. It's not bubblegum, It's deeper so I think it takes time to absorb. There's no way it's his "worst album" as some are histrionically belching. Some folks are so eager to see Moz kill his career they are embarrassing themselves with this silliness.
 

GlasgowChivas

Doing the Terrace Stomp
After a few hours with it, I'd agree with the 3/5's being awarded.

Neither a career high nor low. The trouble with it for me is that it's genuinely the first solo record where I'm more interested in what's going on musically than lyrically.

That's not to say some solo records haven't compositions of musical genius but, for me, any Morrissey song stands or falls on what he sings and how it connects to me. Someone has already shared an opinion, possibly up-thread or in another thread, that I 100% agree with. When Morrissey sings about anything from *his* perspective, from a place of absolute experience, it soars. Whether it's being kicked in the showers by a malignant teacher, pining for a romance gone wrong or comparing himself to Christian Dior - three very different experiences by what is arguably three very different people - it rings true and connects.
Now we don't get that, or if we do it's only for brief moments, not for an entire LP.

'Home...' is by far the standout track on the record; when it cuts loose at the end it SOARS and when Moz roars out the word 'self' at the end I had goosebumps; though if Mando Lopez hadn't just finished watching 'Lethal Weapon' before writing that opening I'll eat his hat. It's practically a lift from "Meet Martin Riggs" by Michael Kamen. Not a bad thing, I love that tune. It gets a point deducted for ending abruptly, like 'You Were Good In You Time' ; I hate that tic with a passion.

Surprisingly, I find that I've got time for 'My Love...' and 'Israel.; the latter for the vocal performance alone, not the lyrical content. In fact, even on the low points of the album - the exception being the end of 'I Bury...'; seriously what the fuck is that about? - it needs to be noted that Morrissey's voice is exceptional here.

So yes, a mixed bag, much as expected. As ever, I find myself hoping that the next record - and surely there will be. BMG have done a power of work here compared to previous labels, though I understand: it's Moz. Anything can happen. - will see a return to the personal, to the recounting of an experience over hectoring and tub-thumping.

It's the lot of a Morrissey fan...to hope for the next great record around the corner, liked he once pined for affection. In the meantime, I'm off to find someone to greet me...

Rankings?
MLIDAFY: 8/10
IWYL: 6/10
JAHWSUOTS: 5/10
HIAQM: 9/10
STDIB: 8/10
IBTL: 5/10
IYL: 7/10
TGFTAWWK: 5/10
ATYPMFIL: 6/10
WYOYL: 7.5/10
WWPUFTP: 6/10
I: 8/10
 
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BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Can I just say this. I don't want to exaggerate, but my initial impressions are that this may be the worst album I've heard by any music act, ever. I'm struggling to think of another album by any artist that left such a horrible aftertaste. In that sense, it's an achievement, to bring about that level of revulsion in a person. But lyrically and musically his career is dead, as is his legacy.

Even Charles Manson's pre-incarceration demos were less appalling than this album. There is no hope to the lyrics at all, and it's not that it's bleak in a way which could still have some merit, it's just turgid. It's artistically non-existent. There are more entertaining YouTube comments than this; teenage edgelords on 4chan have more insightful opinions to offer.

'Israel' is, lyrically, a career low-point, possibly the lowest. 'When You Open Your Legs' is listless, and the rest of the track listing reads like a list of the musically lifeless. 'All the Young People' is an insult. It really calls into question the whole notion of the 'career musician'. Especially those who achieved some level of financial success early on, and also the online media's continued coverage of such figures even after the quality of their recorded output has gone off the cliff edge. To be a career musician is no better than being a career politician.

Would you go and see Messi and Ronaldo play at 58 years old? Or Federer lugging himself around the tennis court while approaching 60? I don't see why this should be any different; increasingly so, with the evidence presented to us on this LP. And I'm not comparing Morrissey to Messi or Ronaldo either, he was never in that league, and after 'Low in High School' he'd be lucky to make the Accrington Stanley subs bench. He's the musical equivalent of Southampton's Ali Dia. Some public figures in certain fields of the arts and entertainment only improve with age, but Mr. Morrissey I'm sorry to say is not among them.

There are touring singer-songwriters playing in sparsely populated dive bars in Berlin tonight, and Amsterdam, barely making ends meet but with so much more to say than this malcontent sitting on his $30 million fortune and subjecting his listener base to half-arsed albums like this. Quarter-arsed. It's an embarrassment to everyone involved -- the listeners, the band, the record label, the production and mixing crews -- through no fault of their own in most cases.

But those within the inner circle who allowed this record to be made without once speaking out and questioning its direction, or its purpose for existing, are entirely complicit. They are cowards and enablers, and Korda Marshall has egg on his face. His cheeks should be burning so red that his dripping facial egg could find itself suddenly poached in seconds from the heat being emitted.

Typically I would give it a second listen to see if my opinions shift as the songs grow more familiar, but the thought of doing so with this particular album makes me feel nauseated. I'm afraid there are no words in the modern English language which could strongly enough express the utter contempt that I feel for what he has committed to record here. It is an attack, an aural and intellectual assault on the listener, nothing less.

Imagine how far-gone you'd have to be even to consider releasing something like this to the public. Edmund Kemper would have more sense than to release this album. With a severed head in one hand and LiHS in the other, he'd be more likely to bury the master tapes of LiHS in his back garden than the head, deeming this album to be the more incriminating and reputation-destroying of the two if found in his possession.

The only people who I could imagine loving this album are hardline Zionists, considering its themes, but even they'd have reasonable questions about its quality.

As fradulent as 'Punk' turned out to be in the end, at least it appeared to be successful - temporarily at least - in pushing out the hackneyed old guard and ushering in an exciting new wave who had something to convey in that moment which needed to be said and heard.
The only regrettable thing today is that there's not another wave of exasperated confrontational youths who'll come along and clear out the deadwood Morrisseys of this world who, like a bad case of the clap, just won't go away.

After his 35 year marathon career he's now hobbling toward the finish line...

While Morrissey is unlikely to trouble the charts with this clunker, the collapse of the music industry is partially responsible for his longevity. No longer can worn out old musicians just be swept aside in favour of the new, as the internet ensures their continued seat at the table. This is true even for somebody with Morrissey's 'comment history'.

Familiarity comes first for record companies as it's a safer bet for them to invest in than in the new and unusual which may not make any dent culturally and brings in poor returns.
This is where the loathsome idea of the 'career musician' rears its Moz-shaped head again.

The Morrissey who exists today would have been less likely to survive in the music business of 30 years ago if he behaved then as he does now when their monopoly was still immutable, and options were limitless, they could afford to dispense with an act like Morrissey whose harmful presence on their label would outweigh and diminish any marginal profits from average sales figures.

They could afford to cut him loose, especially if the sales were lagging far behind those of the true stars on the roster, and he was bringing more baggage and trouble than he's worth. He's signed today on name recognition alone, the artistry left the equation a long time ago.

Once upon a time he'd be locked up like the Marquis de Sade for releasing something so grotesquely inartistic for public consumption, because obviously you'd have to be completely barmy to put your name on such a thing. You don't see me putting my name to this post do you? :crazy:

He would have been laughed at by children on every public square and had tomatoes chucked at him.

He'd also be lampooned in every colonial periodical informing the European diaspora of the goings-on in the Arts world. His name would be irrevocably linked with the likes of William McGonagle. His name would be a contemporaneous, and with time, historical punchline (and it is, and will be, but he would be laughed out of the public sphere entirely in his lifetime and wouldn't dare ever again show his face, not without a fake moustache and name change anyway. In modern times the name 'Morrissey' should be spoken of in the same breath as 'Tania Head'.)

Morrissey is the Andrew Dice Clay of the music world...

At least the works of the Marquis de Sade managed to achieve some sort of posthumous re-evaluation. This album isn't destined for a similarly generous fate , it will be confined to the dustbin of history forever, where it belongs. But in truth it never should have existed in the first place.

Some closing bullet-point observations.
  • In 'Low in High School' Morrissey is the bully in the school bathrooms shoving your head into the toilet and stealing your lunch money (the lunch money being the price of the album, the toilet being the album itself).
  • 'Low in High School' picks up where Lou Reed's 'Metal Machine Music' left off but somehow with fewer sentiments of real value to contribute.
  • While low in Morrissey's 'high school' the unsuspecting listener is grabbed and devoured, and finds that it's blacker than ever before almost as if they're trapped in the belly of the humpback whale being chased by gunships from Bergen. While neither Morrissey nor the whale 'give in', in the whale's case it's an act of defiance, whereas in Morrissey's it's a pathetic display that he refuses to just accept that the gig is well and truly up.
  • 'Low in High School' should be investigated by human rights organisations for the cruel and unusual punishment it inflicts upon its listeners.
  • On the school theme: in 'Low in High School' you watch the album's minutes and seconds slowly pass by -- 25:45...25:46...25:47...25:47 (??)..25:46(!!??) -- like all those late rainy afternoons sitting in math(...maths...LOL!) class, watching the clock, with time passing so slowly that it seems to stop, or for a split second the hand you're watching appears to edge slightly backwards.
  • Listening to 'Low in High School' is the musical equivalent of receiving 'lines' to write as punishment in 'high school', in this instance writing out 'this must be punishment for something I did in a past life' repeatedly for 50 minutes (the album's length).
  • Waking up on Christmas morning and finding 'Low in High School' in your stocking is only a slightly better prospect than waking up on Christmas morning and finding Santa Claus dead on your living room floor.
  • On 'Low in High School' the aural 'high school' in question is Columbine.
  • Referring back to Charles Manson from earlier, upon arriving home after a long day at work I'd rather pull into the driveway and find 'pig' written in blood on my front door than find a package waiting for me in my mailbox with 'Low in High School' contained inside it.
  • "There are no words in the modern English language...." but I gave it a shot, however I'll stop here because I don't want to start exaggerating (re: my initial impressions) about how atrocious this album is.
  • 'Low in High School' is aural syphilis!
Regards (sorry to everyone here who waited patiently for November 17th, some of you with anticipation, and all you got for your trouble and pain was this album which gives a glimpse into the mind of somebody deranged(?))
MOZAMBIGUOUS

P.S. While I write this I've been listening to the radio show 'Mystery Train' online which plays some great stuff. Not all is lost -- I needed to hear something like this to cleanse my soul and 'shake the disease' after my encounter with the oozing black bile of 'Low in High School'. The clouds are beginning to part again. 'Low in High School' contrives to frighten you. It wishes to pull you into its murky depths like the Creature from the Black Lagoon and be your 'friend' forever (forever). Morrissey's 'high school' is actually a cellar, and Morrissey as its principal takes off his mask to reveal a flickering Josef Fritzl-like face and a whole other cast of demonic characters on a kaleidoscopic daguerrotype underneath. He's not the man you thought he was. Avoid. Little lamb, run as fast as you can away from this terrible creation (never giving in), I beseech you, and don't look back.
TL;DR it's shite, although without 'Israel' and 'I Bury the Living' on the tracklist I might have permitted myself to go a touch easier on the old sod, LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLO!!
It's interesting how organised the Cult are in trying to downvote any views that challenge their thralldom!

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