Lost interest in Moz after seeing him and being threatened

IJustAte

New Member
i don't think you guys are reading very carefully before criticizing me.

i stayed in the lobby the entire time. as soon as i got snubbed, i gave up and didn't follow them at all. when he turned around and yelled at me, i was standing in the same place i was standing the whole time.

and i didn't follow him to his room. i waited until they were gone, and then i started to walk to my room. i didn't see what room Moz went in, or come anywhere close.

and again, i didn't expect him to stop and talk to me or sign anything... i just thought it was worth a shot. i'm not mad that he didn't. i'm mad that he allows his bodyguards to treat his fans so rudely.

if you think i'm exaggerating or lying about this, i can't help you. i'm being completely honest about how it happened. and in my opinion, the threat was completely out of line. if you disagree, that's fine.
 

Danny

Senior Member
Another thing you haven't considered is that it's very likely the desk clerk warned Morrissey's party that you'd been hovering around for hours (they will have experience in looking after famous clients) which would have sent them directly into "loony stalker" alert.
 

Worm

Taste the diffidence
i was standing in the same place i was standing the whole time.

Yes. You stood there. You didn't get the point and back off. They both gave you a clear signal and when the bodyguard looked back you were still standing there. The bodyguard thought "The guy didn't get the message". So he made sure you got it the second time.

You were unlucky. You caught him at a bad, bad time, and then had the misfortune of having a room near his, which prolonged the incident. End of story. Don't be so upset about it.
 

MsChievous

Hand Frink
I travel extensively for work and am grumpy when I get in late. I wouldn't be too nice at 4am myself. Give them all a break, they were probably exhausted.
 
You went into the situation with high expectations, whether you care to admit it or not. Morrissey wasn't very receptive. Now you feel hurt. I don't blame him. It was 4 am.

As for the body guard, He was only doing his job. They're suppose to be jerks. If he was overly aggressive with you be assured Moz spoke to him afterwards. He loves his fans.
 

Vauxhall95

I Know It's Over...
Hey Worm,

Nice post as always.

You know I think it is an epidemic in our society now. The sense of entitlement we have, i.e. I purchased every record I have a right to [fill in the blank]. You see this more and more in sports every day. Far to often fans are interfering with players on the field, whereas 20 years ago this type of behavior would have been considered out of bounds. It seems the more ticket prices rise on events, cd's, merchandise, whatever - the more many of us feel we are entitled to that 4am autograph and photo shoot...

Sorry, but I don't see anything wrong with what Morrissey or his bodyguard did. It wasn't just late-- it was 3:30 in the morning. Not surprisingly, he didn't want to be bothered and, as you describe, you were given a clear signal to that effect. Then you followed them anyway and got threatened. Seems reasonable to me.

I'm not an expert on bodyguards but I'm guessing they deliberately overreact to situations like this in order to snuff them out before they even get going. The guy blew up and stopped you in your tracks, which was his intention. Probably standard for all bodyguards in circumstances that are slightly unusual-- that is, not fans on the street in the middle of the day but a guy following him in a hotel lobby at 3:30 am.

It's a shame you didn't enjoy the show, but I think if you reflect on Morrissey's treatment of his fans over the years you'd probably have to concede that he is far more accommodating than not. You picked a bad time to approach him, that's all.
 
I think it was something you ate!
 

Worm

Taste the diffidence
Hey Worm,

Nice post as always.

You know I think it is an epidemic in our society now. The sense of entitlement we have, i.e. I purchased every record I have a right to [fill in the blank]. You see this more and more in sports every day. Far to often fans are interfering with players on the field, whereas 20 years ago this type of behavior would have been considered out of bounds. It seems the more ticket prices rise on events, cd's, merchandise, whatever - the more many of us feel we are entitled to that 4am autograph and photo shoot...

Thanks!

Yes, I think you're absolutely right. I put it down to the breakdown of the barriers between artist and audience. For better or worse, people don't feel they are any different than the people whose art or skill they admire. (I'm not saying that's the case with IJustAte, but in general I think that's true.) It's a weird contradiction. We put celebrities on a pedestal but tear them down when we think they're not on our level. I think it's just the age we live in. Every day, over and over, we're all beaten over the head with our absolute equality. Sometimes we don't like being confronted with boring old talent, which reminds us that we are not always equal, and so we demand humility from those who are talented at this or that.

Again, not directed at this thread, but a general comment in response to yours.
 
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Kewpie

Member
Moderator
Subscriber
Hey Worm,

Nice post as always.

You know I think it is an epidemic in our society now. The sense of entitlement we have, i.e. I purchased every record I have a right to [fill in the blank]. You see this more and more in sports every day. Far to often fans are interfering with players on the field, whereas 20 years ago this type of behavior would have been considered out of bounds. It seems the more ticket prices rise on events, cd's, merchandise, whatever - the more many of us feel we are entitled to that 4am autograph and photo shoot...



I was very shocked to hear one of the people who were unable to get in Wolverhampton Civic Hall in 1988 who shouted "why we can't get in, we buy your records!" when Morrissey was waving at us from the staircase on the way to the stage.

I found out about the gig the day before when I was travelling Scotland, but unable to get there from Edinburgh on time.
It wasn't Morrissey's fault and he was sorry for unable to have all of us turned up.

It's not very sensible that waiting for Morrissey who was very tired and needed a rest four in the morning in a hotel lobby.
 

Danny

Senior Member
Thanks!

Yes, I think you're absolutely right. I put it down to the breakdown of the barriers between artist and audience. For better or worse, people don't feel they are any different than the people whose art or skill they admire. (I'm not saying that's the case with IJustAte, but in general I think that's true.) It's a weird contradiction. We put celebrities on a pedestal but tear them down when we think they're not on our level. I think it's just the age we live in. Every day, over and over, we're all beaten over the head with our absolute equality. Sometimes we don't like being confronted with boring old talent, which reminds us that we are not always equal, and so we demand humility from those who are talented at this or that.

Again, not directed at this thread, but a general comment in response to yours.

I think it's more that we don't tend to think of celebrities as being just like ourselves. If we did we wouldn't even think of bothering them at four o'clock in the morning. Would you bother a family member or friend at that time unless it was an emergency? Of course not. Yet people think they can treat someone they don't know this way. It's like we forget celebrities are human, they are just there for our entertainment and must sing and dance, and give autographs, on cue.
 

Worm

Taste the diffidence
I disagree. People are equal. 'Celebrities' are human just like the rest of us, nothing special apart from the rules our society constructs to make them seem 'better'.

What I think it boils down to is what was described in a documentary I saw a few years ago titled 'The Century of the Self'. What the documentary contends is that over the 20th century people have become more self centred and imposing when it comes to their will to be 'happy' and 'fulfilled', even at the expense of others. It's the rise of the 'me' generation.

I didn't see that documentary. I'm sure it made some good points. However I think with fans it is resentment, plain and simple, when the object of affection dares not to treat the fan like an equal. Maybe we are saying the same thing, and the resentment is caused by our wounded narcissism-- the disappointment of not seeing ourselves reflected in someone else.
 
On One side the bodyguard didn't have to sound so aggressive. May be just say, "sorry but not now" or something like that.

It was the middle of the night, even superstars like Morrissey needs his sleep and not to be stopped by fans wanting autographs.

May be you should of waited to see if you could catch him in the morning.

May be Morrissey should of acknowledged you and may be said to 'sorry but not now'!

I guess people have good stories to tell and some have bad.

I hope it doesn't put you off his music, try to remember he is just a bloke on a cd cover, a song writer and is only human and fame is quite weird sometimes for these people.

May be get this story through to him on "True to you" see if he responds!
 

_ E O R _ E

New Member
Look at the bright side: you're no poorer, only richer with an interesting experience like that. Besides, there will be no guilt when you download the next album for FREE!
 

Worm

Taste the diffidence
I think it's more that we don't tend to think of celebrities as being just like ourselves. If we did we wouldn't even think of bothering them at four o'clock in the morning. Would you bother a family member or friend at that time unless it was an emergency? Of course not. Yet people think they can treat someone they don't know this way. It's like we forget celebrities are human, they are just there for our entertainment and must sing and dance, and give autographs, on cue.

You're right, and that's part of the paradox I was talking about. We worship them as superhuman but then hold them to strict standards of conduct. It's as if at some point they do something and we suddenly go from lapdogs to snarling pit bulls-- I have no idea why, and that tipping point is probably different for different people. I don't think there's ever been more celebrity worship than there is now, and yet if you look at it closely there's so much resentment, too. Case in point: Morrissey-solo.com!
 
true-to-you isn't NME, Julia doesn't choose questions which upset Morrissey.

may be send it in a letter to the NME then!

"true-to-you isn't NME" how would you know unless you are "julia":eek:
 

Hellie

Lost
The night before the Merillville show, I was staying at the Courtyard Marriott, and when i was checking in, Kristeen Young was standing in front of me. I overheard her saying she was part of a "big group" that would be coming in later in the night. So I decided to stay up and wait for this big group, thinking maybe there was a small chance I could catch a glimpse of Morrissey (and who knows, maybe an autograph?)

So I waited in the hotel lobby from about 12:30 until 3:30 AM, when I finally saw a tour bus pull up. I got a little excited, but still had my doubts about whether he would actually be there, or just his crew/band.

After a couple minutes, a couple guys got off the bus and went to the front desk to check in. The hotel lobby was completely empty except for me, so I pretended to be using the computer so I didn't look "suspicious." :)

The guys went back to the bus after checking in, and a few minutes later, one of them walks back off the bus, with none other than Morrissey! I saw them start to walk through the front door of the hotel, so i got up from my seat and slowly & cautiously started walking toward them. I got about 10 feet away from Morrissey, and I guess he saw me out of the corner of his eye, so he glanced in my direction, then immediately looked away when he realized i was a fan. Then his bodyguard (the "porn-star" looking guy) also noticed me, and gave me a dirty look. Then they continued to walk up the steps (which were located in the lobby.

I was disappointed of course, but not necessarily surprised. I gave up, and stayed down in the lobby as I watched Morrissey and the bodyguard ascend the stairs, then walked down the hallway at the top of the stairs (it was a balcony that overlooked the lobby). I didn't say a word to him, i just watched him from a distance. At this point, out of nowhere, the bodyguard looks down at me again and yells "I WILL KNOCK YOU OUT!!!", while Morrissey continued to walk several feet in front of him, obviously aware of what was going on but continued to look straight ahead. I just stood there, speechless, until they were out of sight.

At this point, I decided to walk up the steps and walk in the direction they were walking (that was the same direction as my hotel room anyways). As i turned the corner in the hallway, I heard a door close, then his bodyguard started walking toward me. He stopped me in the hall and said "what do you want???" i said "i was hoping to maybe get a picture with him." he said "no. no way. not at 4 in the morning." i said "ok, alright" and tried to walk to my room, but he was still blocking me. so I said "my room is down this hall" and he finally let me pass.

The whole situation has made me lose a lot of respect for Moz, though. Yes, I'm aware that he is a celebrity, and has been a celebrity for 25 years. I know he probably has fans trying to approach him on an almost daily basis, and I know it probably gets exhausting. I was not expecting him to stop and say hi to me or sign an autograph or take a picture; i was just hoping that maybe he would. But honestly i would not have been upset with him if he had simply looked at me and walked past me. I understand he can't stop for every fan that approaches him, and i would never hold that against him.

What DID bother me, though, is how his bodyguard (who, in a way, represents Moz), could say something so rude and violent to me, and Morrissey didn't give a sh*t. Here i am, a fan of 10 years, standing in an otherwise-vacant hotel lobby, doing nothing more than standing and watching my idol walk past me and ignoring me. I don't look like a freak or anything.. i just look like a normal, skinny, 26-year old guy standing there by myself holding a copy of Bona Drag and a pen. I didn't say anything to him, i didn't bombard him, I didn't do anything that could be perceived as threatening. And after you consider all this, it didn't bother Morrissey one bit that his bodyguard threatened his fan with physical violence for no reason whatsoever.

The first time I saw Morrissey (I drove 20 hours across the country to see him play in Denver in 2002), he stopped in the middle of a song to yell at the security guards who were being too rough with a fan trying to get on stage. 5 years later, he's employing a bodyguard who threatens a harmless fan with violence and it doesn't bother him at all.

I've been a die-hard fan for about 9 or 10 years now, and have spent a ridiculous amount of time and money on this man. I've seen him 7 times now (in 6 different cities), bought all of his records/singles, read hundreds of news articles/interviews with him, memorized his lyrics, introduced friends to his music... and then I finally see him in person and not only does he ignore me (which alone doesn't bother me), but he allows his bodyguard to be unnecessarily rude, violent, and disrepectful to me. The whole situation was just a huge turnoff.

You read his lyrics, and his interviews, and see him perform, and you get the impression that he is a sensitive, loving, peaceful, gentle man who cares about his fans and despises hatred and violence. But maybe that's just how he pretends to be when he has a large audience. I can understand being rude to me if i was a paparazzi, or if i was acting crazy and invading his space.. but I wasn't. I just stood there.

Maybe I'm being too sensitive, I don't know. But it just seemed really, really rude to treat a fan like that.

But I still went to the concert, and even though I had front row seats (which I've never had before), I just couldn't enjoy it as much as all the other shows I've been to. I tried listening to Your Arsenal on the way home, and I couldn't enjoy that the same way I used to either. Maybe I'll get over it eventually, but for now, I'm not the fan I used to be. It's kind of depressing.


It may be because I`ve been really poorly and i`m feeling a bit blue but your post has made me cry...because it rings true.I`ve been a fan since i was 14 and I`m now 38 and as much as I love him I do fear there is about him nowadays an arrogance that was never there before.He was always "approachable" in a distant way.:confused::)..I know that doesn`t really make sense.But he would sign,shake hands,talk.It stems i think from the over zealous rules of health and safety that goes with the shows.At the end of shows he cannot wait to be off nowadays.He`s left the building even before the lights go up.I actually find this unbelievable.No possibility of meet and greets with fans like other bands.I know his love of the general public is slight...but the love of his fans should count for a little more.

I think the minute he becomes too much of a prima dona even die hard fans will turn away.

I don`t believe bodyguards are at fault.Tom Cruise love him or loathe him at any given time has about six body guards surrounding his person but he will move them aside and stand in the pouring rain for literally hours to sign chat and have photographs with people,as does Johnny Depp although not to the extent of Tom Cruise.Cruise is an absolute professional and a gentlemen who knows that the people who wait for him are the people that have put him where he is today.I pray Morrissey doesn`t loose the common touch.
 
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