London - O2 Brixton Academy (Oct. 11, 2022) post-show

Post your info and reviews related to this concert in the comments section below. Other links (photos, external reviews, etc.) related to this concert will also be compiled in this section as they are sent in.

Setlist:

How Soon Is Now? / We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful / Our Frank / Knockabout World / First Of The Gang To Die / Irish Blood, English Heart / Shoplifters Of The World / Sure Enough, The Telephone Rings / Rebels Without Applause / I Am Veronica / Half A Person / My Hurling Days Are Done / Bonfire Of Teenagers / Everyday Is Like Sunday / Never Had No One Ever / Have-A-Go Merchant / The Loop / Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want / Jack The Ripper // Sweet And Tender Hooligan

Setlist courtesy of 'Buddy TC', @This Charming Bowie & @dneuer


 
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BookishBoy

Well-Known Member
Labelling First of the Gang as "heavy machismo" is a bit of an epic misreading! The journo has somehow missed the amusingly less than subtle camp undercurrent running through the song...

Not that Jack the Ripper or Hooligan are exactly examples of "heavy machismo" either. Jack being one of his greatest love songs, and Hooligan being entirely ironic!
Yes, it seems like an attempt by the author to portray Morrissey as a "rough" or "dangerous" kind of gay man, to be contrasted with someone like Neil Tennant (mentioned near the end of the article), who is more acceptable with his refined (and middle class) gay sensibilities.
 

BookishBoy

Well-Known Member
Here's another review of the Brixton show, this time in the Evening Standard:

The ‘separate the art from the artist debate’ rarely rages more wildly than when discussing the music and mouth of Morrissey. Many have disowned The Smiths’ frontman despite — or perhaps because of — growing up so intimately with his music, and forming large parts of their identities around his words. For many who let go of their fandom due to the singer’s anti-immigration comments, support of far-right political parties and beyond, it hurt more than most.

Sticking with him into the 2020s has become an act of wilful ignorance or defiance then, depending on who you ask. Continued support of the singer often comes with the requirement of also engaging with his politics.

Somewhat surprisingly though, the 5,000 fans packed like sardines into Brixton Academy on Tuesday night for the penultimate gig of a UK and Irish tour, were rarely asked to engage with Morrissey’s beliefs.

Instead, they were presented with a fuss-free, impeccably performed selection of solo and Smiths hits at a gig that felt remarkable for how formulaic and simple it was, from a man who has always been anything but.

Launching straight into How Soon Is Now? with earnest and intoxicating gusto, the Brixton show felt like it came from a singer and a man who had something to prove again, whether he’d agree or not. Through renditions of First of the Gang to Die, Irish Blood, English Heart and Shoplifters of the World Unite all packed into the first half hour of the gig, he showcased a voice that has maintained its gorgeous, era-defining croon, and was backed by a trusty and impressive band.

It was only on Bonfire of Teenagers, the title track from Morrissey’s upcoming studio album, that you felt the need to take sides. “Many people are too polite and too British to talk about the subject of this next song, but I’m not,” he told the crowd before performing the track concerning the Manchester Arena bombing of 2017, which the singer has called “England’s 9/11”.

In it, he sang: “And the silly people sing ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ / I can assure you I will look back in anger ’till the day I die,” lyrics which have both been praised for their power and criticised for being disrespectful to grieving families. At Brixton, it got the biggest cheer of the night.

This moment aside, Morrissey largely sidestepped the rambling rants many might have expected, in favour of a hit-packed, rapturously received gig that was excellently paced, carefully considered and proved that, should he want to, he has the voice to go on for plenty more years. While it was a show unlikely to bring naysayers back, those who have stuck around were fed well by their enduring hero.
 
I

It’s me again

Guest
The fact that he’s got through a whole string of UK gigs without saying anything too controversial is interesting isn’t it? I can’t recall when he’s last managed that. If you couple that with the inferences that the new album will be out “soon”, it makes you wonder whether a label has said they’d release it if he could show them he can restrain himself for a while. For the label, what they simply wont do now is handle controversial acts and waste money fire-fighting (unless of course the pay off is mega-£$).
 

Bluebirds

Well-Known Member
Here's another review of the Brixton show, this time in the Evening Standard:

The ‘separate the art from the artist debate’ rarely rages more wildly than when discussing the music and mouth of Morrissey. Many have disowned The Smiths’ frontman despite — or perhaps because of — growing up so intimately with his music, and forming large parts of their identities around his words. For many who let go of their fandom due to the singer’s anti-immigration comments, support of far-right political parties and beyond, it hurt more than most.

Sticking with him into the 2020s has become an act of wilful ignorance or defiance then, depending on who you ask. Continued support of the singer often comes with the requirement of also engaging with his politics.

Somewhat surprisingly though, the 5,000 fans packed like sardines into Brixton Academy on Tuesday night for the penultimate gig of a UK and Irish tour, were rarely asked to engage with Morrissey’s beliefs.

Instead, they were presented with a fuss-free, impeccably performed selection of solo and Smiths hits at a gig that felt remarkable for how formulaic and simple it was, from a man who has always been anything but.

Launching straight into How Soon Is Now? with earnest and intoxicating gusto, the Brixton show felt like it came from a singer and a man who had something to prove again, whether he’d agree or not. Through renditions of First of the Gang to Die, Irish Blood, English Heart and Shoplifters of the World Unite all packed into the first half hour of the gig, he showcased a voice that has maintained its gorgeous, era-defining croon, and was backed by a trusty and impressive band.

It was only on Bonfire of Teenagers, the title track from Morrissey’s upcoming studio album, that you felt the need to take sides. “Many people are too polite and too British to talk about the subject of this next song, but I’m not,” he told the crowd before performing the track concerning the Manchester Arena bombing of 2017, which the singer has called “England’s 9/11”.

In it, he sang: “And the silly people sing ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ / I can assure you I will look back in anger ’till the day I die,” lyrics which have both been praised for their power and criticised for being disrespectful to grieving families. At Brixton, it got the biggest cheer of the night.

This moment aside, Morrissey largely sidestepped the rambling rants many might have expected, in favour of a hit-packed, rapturously received gig that was excellently paced, carefully considered and proved that, should he want to, he has the voice to go on for plenty more years. While it was a show unlikely to bring naysayers back, those who have stuck around were fed well by their enduring hero.
That seems like a fair review imo
 

Famous when dead

Vulgarian
Moderator
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FWD.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><>
Here's another review of the Brixton show, this time in the Evening Standard:

The ‘separate the art from the artist debate’ rarely rages more wildly than when discussing the music and mouth of Morrissey. Many have disowned The Smiths’ frontman despite — or perhaps because of — growing up so intimately with his music, and forming large parts of their identities around his words. For many who let go of their fandom due to the singer’s anti-immigration comments, support of far-right political parties and beyond, it hurt more than most.

Sticking with him into the 2020s has become an act of wilful ignorance or defiance then, depending on who you ask. Continued support of the singer often comes with the requirement of also engaging with his politics.

Somewhat surprisingly though, the 5,000 fans packed like sardines into Brixton Academy on Tuesday night for the penultimate gig of a UK and Irish tour, were rarely asked to engage with Morrissey’s beliefs.

Instead, they were presented with a fuss-free, impeccably performed selection of solo and Smiths hits at a gig that felt remarkable for how formulaic and simple it was, from a man who has always been anything but.

Launching straight into How Soon Is Now? with earnest and intoxicating gusto, the Brixton show felt like it came from a singer and a man who had something to prove again, whether he’d agree or not. Through renditions of First of the Gang to Die, Irish Blood, English Heart and Shoplifters of the World Unite all packed into the first half hour of the gig, he showcased a voice that has maintained its gorgeous, era-defining croon, and was backed by a trusty and impressive band.

It was only on Bonfire of Teenagers, the title track from Morrissey’s upcoming studio album, that you felt the need to take sides. “Many people are too polite and too British to talk about the subject of this next song, but I’m not,” he told the crowd before performing the track concerning the Manchester Arena bombing of 2017, which the singer has called “England’s 9/11”.

In it, he sang: “And the silly people sing ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ / I can assure you I will look back in anger ’till the day I die,” lyrics which have both been praised for their power and criticised for being disrespectful to grieving families. At Brixton, it got the biggest cheer of the night.

This moment aside, Morrissey largely sidestepped the rambling rants many might have expected, in favour of a hit-packed, rapturously received gig that was excellently paced, carefully considered and proved that, should he want to, he has the voice to go on for plenty more years. While it was a show unlikely to bring naysayers back, those who have stuck around were fed well by their enduring hero.

In it, he sang: “And the silly people sing ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ / I can assure you I will look back in anger ’till the day I die,” lyrics which have both been praised for their power and criticised for being disrespectful to grieving families. At Brixton, it got the biggest cheer of the night.’



More disrespectful than telling them and others to not look back in anger? to deny their own feelings? to just forget it and just move on? For the song and the way it was used can surely be interpreted that way.

‘At Brixton, it got the biggest cheer of the night.’

as it should.

singing and swaying …..


 

david ingemarsson

Active Member
Here's another review of the Brixton show, this time in the Evening Standard:

The ‘separate the art from the artist debate’ rarely rages more wildly than when discussing the music and mouth of Morrissey. Many have disowned The Smiths’ frontman despite — or perhaps because of — growing up so intimately with his music, and forming large parts of their identities around his words. For many who let go of their fandom due to the singer’s anti-immigration comments, support of far-right political parties and beyond, it hurt more than most.

Sticking with him into the 2020s has become an act of wilful ignorance or defiance then, depending on who you ask. Continued support of the singer often comes with the requirement of also engaging with his politics.

Somewhat surprisingly though, the 5,000 fans packed like sardines into Brixton Academy on Tuesday night for the penultimate gig of a UK and Irish tour, were rarely asked to engage with Morrissey’s beliefs.

Instead, they were presented with a fuss-free, impeccably performed selection of solo and Smiths hits at a gig that felt remarkable for how formulaic and simple it was, from a man who has always been anything but.

Launching straight into How Soon Is Now? with earnest and intoxicating gusto, the Brixton show felt like it came from a singer and a man who had something to prove again, whether he’d agree or not. Through renditions of First of the Gang to Die, Irish Blood, English Heart and Shoplifters of the World Unite all packed into the first half hour of the gig, he showcased a voice that has maintained its gorgeous, era-defining croon, and was backed by a trusty and impressive band.

It was only on Bonfire of Teenagers, the title track from Morrissey’s upcoming studio album, that you felt the need to take sides. “Many people are too polite and too British to talk about the subject of this next song, but I’m not,” he told the crowd before performing the track concerning the Manchester Arena bombing of 2017, which the singer has called “England’s 9/11”.

In it, he sang: “And the silly people sing ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ / I can assure you I will look back in anger ’till the day I die,” lyrics which have both been praised for their power and criticised for being disrespectful to grieving families. At Brixton, it got the biggest cheer of the night.

This moment aside, Morrissey largely sidestepped the rambling rants many might have expected, in favour of a hit-packed, rapturously received gig that was excellently paced, carefully considered and proved that, should he want to, he has the voice to go on for plenty more years. While it was a show unlikely to bring naysayers back, those who have stuck around were fed well by their enduring hero.
good review

but i don't think he's right in saying bonfire got the biggest cheer - not at all actually.

i don't really get how that song is so controversial anyway
 

WildeCarnation

New Member
Here's a (negative, basically) review of the show in the New Statesman, by Fergal Kinney. (Who is, according to his Twitter, quite excited by the prospect of his review getting slaughtered by people on here...You may or may not wish to give him that particular thrill.)

Full text:

It was London that Morrissey excelled in romanticising during the first two decades of his career – more so than his home city of Manchester. He lived round the corner from Alan Bennett in Camden, and on songs such as “Come Back to Camden” and “Hairdresser on Fire” used the city’s Victorian grandeur as a backdrop to his constantly reshuffled themes of isolation, sexual repression and English nostalgia.

On Tuesday night (11 October), the 5,000-capacity Brixton Academy is sold out, though the room is far smaller than the O2 Arena or Royal Albert Hall at which the singer – now primarily a resident of the US – has tended to play when he’s back in the capital.

In the past five years, Morrissey’s far-right sympathies – the subject of press speculation since at least the 1990s – passed beyond the border of plausible deniability, a border often busily patrolled by his fan base. He has voiced support for the minor right-wing groupuscule For Britain, which is led by the doomed Ukip leadership challenger Anne Marie Walters. The bewildering obscurity of his nationalist affiliations appears to be a point of pride.

“It’s very difficult to reconcile,” said Lottie, an 18-year-old English literature student from Colchester in the queue for the Brixton performance. “I don’t think he has said anything racist, I just think he has different opinions on national identity to everybody else, and I respect it. I don’t agree with it.”

Others are more strident. “Leave Morrissey alone!” Juliet, a Londoner in her late 50s, told me. “He’s a tender, kind guy. What he’s thinking about is the forgotten English people. It’s fine for us here, watching foreign films or going to foreign restaurants, but he’s defending them.”

Flanked by his five-piece band, Morrissey strides on to the stage in a black tuxedo with dickie bow and Royal British Legion poppy. “Welcome,” he said in an arch, ironic tone, “to an evening of free-form jazz and open debate.” His croon is still deep and rich, with enough technical ballast for material four decades old to land with its intended power, like the gothic bombast of opener “How Soon Is Now”. The past, in Morrissey’s art, is always the place to be, and fittingly tonight’s set is close to that of a heritage act. Three new songs aside, very little of the past 20 years of his career is showcased.

Though the singer was once a byword for a kind of literate, fey outsiderdom, much of this performance circles around another Morrissey trope: that of the tough, rough and misunderstood geezer. During the 1992 track “Jack the Ripper” (“this song reminds me of Pentonville Road”), he slashes the air with his microphone as he growls over a protagonist whose “face is as mean as your life has been”, while the greasy, glam stomp of “First of the Gang to Die” and closer “Sweet and Tender Hooligan” glorify this archetype.

This heavy machismo is underlined by the singer’s backdrop, a rotating slideshow of mostly male icons including Frank Sinatra and George Best, as well as pictures of Manchester terraced streets from the 1950s and 1960s, before subsequent developments – and, perhaps, demographic shifts (Morrissey has complained that “you’ll hear every accent under the sun apart from the British accent” on London’s streets). When women do appear on the backdrop, they are exclusively Coronation Street matriarchs.

“Many people are too polite or too British to talk about the subject of this next song,” warned Morrissey, as the venue audibly hushed, “but I’m not.”

“Bonfire of Teenagers” is a new and so far unreleased song about the 2017 Manchester Arena bombings. “All the morons sang ‘Don’t Look Back In Anger’,” intoned Morrissey of the impromptu singalong that defined Manchester’s public response to the attacks, “but I will look back in anger until the day I die.”

Morrissey has written about tragedies that have defined the north before – the first song he wrote with Johnny Marr was about the Moors murders, beginning a lineage that includes his 2004 song “Munich Air Disaster 1958”, referencing the Manchester United air disaster. Though he is at his most animated during “Bonfire of Teenagers” – finger-pointing and accusatory against the chilly piano accompaniment – its imagery of children saying goodbye, later “vapourised, vapourised” feels lumpen, in a song that is both slight and crass. “Go easy on the killer”, is its repeated refrain, vastly misaligned with real events. Given what we know about the singer’s political affiliations, there’s a sense too of a man pulling his punches, of implications he is not prepared to make explicit.

I do not think that the grieving people who sang “Don’t Look Back in Anger” in St Ann’s Square, Manchester after the bombing were morons. It was an expression of solidarity and resilience that did not obscure the tragedy but gave people a popular civic language to commemorate a horrific atrocity. Earlier this year, I watched Pet Shop Boys perform at Manchester Arena on the five-year anniversary of the attacks. Neil Tennant spoke in clear, certain terms about the attack being a “hate crime” and dedicated “Being Boring”, a gorgeous and mournful song about lives that do not get to grow old, to the 22 victims. That felt more affecting for the audience than “Bonfire of Teenagers” did last night, though the hall applauds as it ends.

“Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want”, aired late in the set, is the Smiths classic that feels hard to dim even by association. The waltz’s grandiose melancholy terrifically betrays the Irish parentage of its two songwriters, Morrissey and Marr. Like so much British pop of the postwar period, it was the product of immigration and changing cities. That’s something its singer now wants to deny to future generations, happier instead to walk backwards into comforting, fanciful and false visions of a bygone England.
MACHISMO 💀💀💀 pls
 

snoddywilko

Well-Known Member
good review

but i don't think he's right in saying bonfire got the biggest cheer - not at all actually.

i don't really get how that song is so controversial anyway

It seems to me that it is deemed ‘controversial’ by somebody, somewhere, because…

A. He is daring to sing about an Islamic extremist suicide bomber killing a lot of white British people - predominantly children - & this is something that some people don’t think we should talk about, for some reason.

B. He calls the people singing “Don’t Look Back in Anger” morons.
 

Redacted

Perfectly Satisfied
It was hard going for a while Redacted, the girl who was injured actually got over things fairly quickly as she put all her energy into getting better and walking again on her false legs and she always says she has no recollection of what happened due to shock. Her school friends including my daughter dealt with it hit in different ways. Mine needed a good year of counselling as she wouldn’t go into Manchester or anywhere were their were large crowds. She’s absolutely fine now and goes to gigs etc
It goes without saying that no one should have to go thru something like that, esp children and their parents should not have to watch their children go thru it, but such is the world we live in, unfortunately. I am very sorry for how it affected your child and her friends, but very happy to hear things have gotten considerable better. God Bless you all.
 
M

MozAngeles74

Guest
Post your info and reviews related to this concert in the comments section below. Other links (photos, external reviews, etc.) related to this concert will also be compiled in this section as they are sent in.

Setlist:

How Soon Is Now? / We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful / Our Frank / Knockabout World / First Of The Gang To Die / Irish Blood, English Heart / Shoplifters Of The World / Sure Enough, The Telephone Rings / Rebels Without Applause / I Am Veronica / Half A Person / My Hurling Days Are Done / Bonfire Of Teenagers / Everyday Is Like Sunday / Never Had No One Ever / Have-A-Go Merchant / The Loop / Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want / Jack The Ripper // Sweet And Tender Hooligan

Setlist courtesy of 'Buddy TC', @This Charming Bowie & @dneuer


Meanwhile, the Cure just did a 27 song setlist, with different songs every night..
 
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