London - O2 Brixton Academy (Oct. 11, 2022) post-show

Post your info and reviews related to this concert in the comments section below. Other links (photos, external reviews, etc.) related to this concert will also be compiled in this section as they are sent in.

Setlist:

How Soon Is Now? / We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful / Our Frank / Knockabout World / First Of The Gang To Die / Irish Blood, English Heart / Shoplifters Of The World / Sure Enough, The Telephone Rings / Rebels Without Applause / I Am Veronica / Half A Person / My Hurling Days Are Done / Bonfire Of Teenagers / Everyday Is Like Sunday / Never Had No One Ever / Have-A-Go Merchant / The Loop / Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want / Jack The Ripper // Sweet And Tender Hooligan

Setlist courtesy of 'Buddy TC', @This Charming Bowie & @dneuer


 
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D

Deleted member 30524

Guest
I once got to smell a scrap of his ripped shirt when he played the Hydro at Glasgow, if memory serves me right, it was red, felt like crate paper, and smelled of Palma Violets.
A very odd experience all round
really.
 

Surface

Chilling in Cheshire.
Sounds like he enjoyed The Smiths stuff - a bit like most punters who go and watch Morrissey do.... (And Johnny Marr for that matter.)
It seems like he didn't get press accreditation for the gig; I wonder if his review would have been slightly more positive if he had...

The 2nd paragraph speaks volumes about this guy, yes Brixton is much smaller than the O2 but The Albert Hall holds 272 more people than Brixton, so clearly he has an agenda here.
 

Surface

Chilling in Cheshire.
I didn’t see people ‘sing and sway’ in the St Ann’s video coverage.

I believe Morrissey more likely wrote the song after seeing this event where people ‘mourners’ are actually singing and swaying …




I love how the camera at 2:18 zooms in and stays on the only person that actually looks like they are grieving, or she could just be having a bad acid trip, lol.




That may be, but I don’t hear that many singing at the St Ann’s Square, there seems to be confusion and awkward silence while the one person starts up the song and continues to sing. A male voice, obviously embarrassed by the situation pleads with and goads everyone on to join in and sing, a distant male voice yells out ‘we love Manchester’, to which people applaud.



Not sure what you are trying to say here Ketamine, there’s plenty of anger about this atrocity around Manchester. One of my youngest daughters class mates had to have both her legs amputated due being hit by shrapnel and along with most of her classmates had to have counselling, so just like Morrissey , she will never forget and will be angry for the rest of her life.
 

🐈🐈🐈

Well-Known Member
Not sure what you are trying to say here Ketamine, there’s plenty of anger about this atrocity around Manchester. One of my youngest daughters class mates had to have both her legs amputated due being hit by shrapnel and along with most of her classmates had to have counselling, so just like Morrissey , she will never forget and will be angry for the rest of her life.
Well said, pal.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><>
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Not sure what you are trying to say here Ketamine, there’s plenty of anger about this atrocity around Manchester. One of my youngest daughters class mates had to have both her legs amputated due being hit by shrapnel and along with most of her classmates had to have counselling, so just like Morrissey , she will never forget and will be angry for the rest of her life.

Please reread my post, Surface. There are no people singing and swaying at the st Ann’s square, I don’t see how or why people keep referencing that event as the event that Morrissey is singing about.

I posted both events so one could judge for themselves. I did not talk about the tragedy or people involved. Or about anger.
Surface, I’m not sure why you brought that up in regards to my post in this thread.
 

A scanty bit of thing

Antecedents drive stakes into the ground
Gorgeous suit. Beautiful performance. And you have a lovely singing voice, my dear. Looks like they really did bless you and caress you. LOVE.

Hope Brighton knows what Friday night fireworks look like: MORRISSEY 🌟💫
 
technically, my phone/AWM’s IG account, but only matters that people dig it. It’s the least I could do as thanks for the overwhelming support and appreciation for the band (and Alain specifically). 🙏
Apologies the quality isn’t better, but it’s “something”
No need to apologise for the quality. I am so grateful for what you are doing. As someone who has been unable to take in this tour in person it has been so good to catch the live songs. Thank you very much.
 

goinghome

Hearts securely stacked
It looked like it the was the Ride of the Valkyies segment from Apocalypse Now - but the video is on Youtube and it says it is made up of clips from Apocalyse Now and Full Metal Jacket. With Search and Destroy by the Stooges, of course.



And the other video was indeed Vince Taylor. The fading star 'messiah' who was probably one of the main inspirations for the character of Ziggy Stardust. This brief biography is well worth a watch...


Thanks for double-checking and correcting credits, gashonthenail, and also for interesting tidbit about VT & Ziggy.
 

goinghome

Hearts securely stacked
👆
This could well be the case.
Alain's last efforts included a physical product eventually, but he got it out to big digital streaming and sales sevices (including Amazon) quite efficiently for a 'small' EP's release.
The only real stumbling block would be...
Well, no guesses needed :)
Regards,
FWD.






Could we do a petition to a record company we think is the ideal fit?! Bring this thread with us?!
 

goinghome

Hearts securely stacked
Here's a (negative, basically) review of the show in the New Statesman, by Fergal Kinney. (Who is, according to his Twitter, quite excited by the prospect of his review getting slaughtered by people on here...You may or may not wish to give him that particular thrill.)

Full text:

It was London that Morrissey excelled in romanticising during the first two decades of his career – more so than his home city of Manchester. He lived round the corner from Alan Bennett in Camden, and on songs such as “Come Back to Camden” and “Hairdresser on Fire” used the city’s Victorian grandeur as a backdrop to his constantly reshuffled themes of isolation, sexual repression and English nostalgia.

On Tuesday night (11 October), the 5,000-capacity Brixton Academy is sold out, though the room is far smaller than the O2 Arena or Royal Albert Hall at which the singer – now primarily a resident of the US – has tended to play when he’s back in the capital.

In the past five years, Morrissey’s far-right sympathies – the subject of press speculation since at least the 1990s – passed beyond the border of plausible deniability, a border often busily patrolled by his fan base. He has voiced support for the minor right-wing groupuscule For Britain, which is led by the doomed Ukip leadership challenger Anne Marie Walters. The bewildering obscurity of his nationalist affiliations appears to be a point of pride.

“It’s very difficult to reconcile,” said Lottie, an 18-year-old English literature student from Colchester in the queue for the Brixton performance. “I don’t think he has said anything racist, I just think he has different opinions on national identity to everybody else, and I respect it. I don’t agree with it.”

Others are more strident. “Leave Morrissey alone!” Juliet, a Londoner in her late 50s, told me. “He’s a tender, kind guy. What he’s thinking about is the forgotten English people. It’s fine for us here, watching foreign films or going to foreign restaurants, but he’s defending them.”

Flanked by his five-piece band, Morrissey strides on to the stage in a black tuxedo with dickie bow and Royal British Legion poppy. “Welcome,” he said in an arch, ironic tone, “to an evening of free-form jazz and open debate.” His croon is still deep and rich, with enough technical ballast for material four decades old to land with its intended power, like the gothic bombast of opener “How Soon Is Now”. The past, in Morrissey’s art, is always the place to be, and fittingly tonight’s set is close to that of a heritage act. Three new songs aside, very little of the past 20 years of his career is showcased.

Though the singer was once a byword for a kind of literate, fey outsiderdom, much of this performance circles around another Morrissey trope: that of the tough, rough and misunderstood geezer. During the 1992 track “Jack the Ripper” (“this song reminds me of Pentonville Road”), he slashes the air with his microphone as he growls over a protagonist whose “face is as mean as your life has been”, while the greasy, glam stomp of “First of the Gang to Die” and closer “Sweet and Tender Hooligan” glorify this archetype.

This heavy machismo is underlined by the singer’s backdrop, a rotating slideshow of mostly male icons including Frank Sinatra and George Best, as well as pictures of Manchester terraced streets from the 1950s and 1960s, before subsequent developments – and, perhaps, demographic shifts (Morrissey has complained that “you’ll hear every accent under the sun apart from the British accent” on London’s streets). When women do appear on the backdrop, they are exclusively Coronation Street matriarchs.

“Many people are too polite or too British to talk about the subject of this next song,” warned Morrissey, as the venue audibly hushed, “but I’m not.”

“Bonfire of Teenagers” is a new and so far unreleased song about the 2017 Manchester Arena bombings. “All the morons sang ‘Don’t Look Back In Anger’,” intoned Morrissey of the impromptu singalong that defined Manchester’s public response to the attacks, “but I will look back in anger until the day I die.”

Morrissey has written about tragedies that have defined the north before – the first song he wrote with Johnny Marr was about the Moors murders, beginning a lineage that includes his 2004 song “Munich Air Disaster 1958”, referencing the Manchester United air disaster. Though he is at his most animated during “Bonfire of Teenagers” – finger-pointing and accusatory against the chilly piano accompaniment – its imagery of children saying goodbye, later “vapourised, vapourised” feels lumpen, in a song that is both slight and crass. “Go easy on the killer”, is its repeated refrain, vastly misaligned with real events. Given what we know about the singer’s political affiliations, there’s a sense too of a man pulling his punches, of implications he is not prepared to make explicit.

I do not think that the grieving people who sang “Don’t Look Back in Anger” in St Ann’s Square, Manchester after the bombing were morons. It was an expression of solidarity and resilience that did not obscure the tragedy but gave people a popular civic language to commemorate a horrific atrocity. Earlier this year, I watched Pet Shop Boys perform at Manchester Arena on the five-year anniversary of the attacks. Neil Tennant spoke in clear, certain terms about the attack being a “hate crime” and dedicated “Being Boring”, a gorgeous and mournful song about lives that do not get to grow old, to the 22 victims. That felt more affecting for the audience than “Bonfire of Teenagers” did last night, though the hall applauds as it ends.

“Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want”, aired late in the set, is the Smiths classic that feels hard to dim even by association. The waltz’s grandiose melancholy terrifically betrays the Irish parentage of its two songwriters, Morrissey and Marr. Like so much British pop of the postwar period, it was the product of immigration and changing cities. That’s something its singer now wants to deny to future generations, happier instead to walk backwards into comforting, fanciful and false visions of a bygone England.
This reviewer seems not to have attended the concert with an open mind, if he went at all. Too many stale cliches here. The New Statesman couldn't put a foot wrong for nearly a 100 years but even their values are going the way of Fox News these days e.g. https://www.theguardian.com/media/2...-in-a-battle-of-ideas-and-a-fight-for-readers
 
M

mozzz

Guest
Can someone identify the songs from before the films?

I think they were the same at the Palladium.

I remember Yoko Ono and Siouxsie and the Banshees!

Thanks
 

Redacted

Perfectly Satisfied
I see the bigger picture in all this.
I see a desperate man !!!! Out on his arse.

Look at the tell tail signs.

A sparse low budget stage set that will fit into a small trailer and hook onto the back of the tour bus. (7 lights, projector and a smoke machine)
The need to write SOLD OUT on every venue poster and post on social media.
Finally admitting to himself that he had no other option but to bring Alain back in to get the Lawnmower chugging again.
The Manchester gimmick song even though he‘s had 4ck all to do with Manchester for years.
He now arrives for performances on the tour bus because nobody will foot the bill for the limo’s anymore.
The selling of the signature.
More tatty crap merch than Camden market.
An L P that no label will invest in.
No bollocks when it comes to mentioning the death of Her Majesty or sing the Big Smith’s singy songy about her.
The introduction of the gimmick song in Manchester was a whispered one.

Its all smoke and mirrors, don’t be fooled.
He’s nothing but a CrankFraud walking in the rain just to get wet on purpose.

Luff n hugs to ya’ll

Benny 🇬🇧 :knife:
Benny, tsk
 

Redacted

Perfectly Satisfied
Not sure what you are trying to say here Ketamine, there’s plenty of anger about this atrocity around Manchester. One of my youngest daughters class mates had to have both her legs amputated due being hit by shrapnel and along with most of her classmates had to have counselling, so just like Morrissey , she will never forget and will be angry for the rest of her life.
I am so sorry, I can't imagine the trauma
 

Surface

Chilling in Cheshire.
I am so sorry, I can't imagine the trauma

It was hard going for a while Redacted, the girl who was injured actually got over things fairly quickly as she put all her energy into getting better and walking again on her false legs and she always says she has no recollection of what happened due to shock. Her school friends including my daughter dealt with it hit in different ways. Mine needed a good year of counselling as she wouldn’t go into Manchester or anywhere were their were large crowds. She’s absolutely fine now and goes to gigs etc
 
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