Johnny Marr on his autobiography, admits he hasn't read Morrissey's - MOJO

Johnny Marr On His Memoir: “I’ve Got An Amazing Memory!” - MOJO
The former Smith updates MOJO about progress on his autobiography. Top Of The Pops, drugs and falling off roofs all figure.

Excerpt:

The former Smith speaks about his new live album Adrenalin Baby and the book, due out next summer, in our new issue, (December 15 / #265) which is on sale now in the UK.

...Of course Marr’s is not the first memoir concerning The Smiths, though it seems unlikely there will be too many similarities between the guitarist’s literary endeavours and those published by the band’s singer.

“I honestly haven’t read Morrissey’s book,” Marr admits. “I really don’t feel like I need to. I’ve heard about what it’s like and that’s fine.”

Also:

Johnny Marr vows to keep memoir fun - new! magazine

Excerpt:

Morrissey's tome received huge critical praise for its candid narrative, but some critics took aim at the singer for using the book to launch scathing attacks on his old enemies in the music industry and even his former bandmates.

Marr is a quarter of the way through penning his life story and he is making a determined effort to avoid criticising those he has worked with, insisting he will not be giving fans any "crass sensationalism".

He tells Mojo magazine, "I honestly haven't read Morrissey's book. I really don't feel like I need to. I've heard about what it's like and that's fine. Not all of what I've been though, like anyone's life, can be dressed up to be something cheery when it wasn't. That's all right too.

"I'd like to say there's a lot of reappraisal, 'cos that would imply a certain kind of wisdom, but in the case of what happened with The Smiths, there's not really that much reappraisal. But crass sensationalism isn't really my thing, nor am I particularly interested in being nasty."
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Whilst I enjoyed a lot of Morrissey autobiography (particularly the stuff regarding his childhood), the Smiths sections were pretty disappointing. He spent most of his time whinging about chart positions, and how shit Geoff Travis and Rough Trade were, and vastly more pages bitching about the court case than on what the band actually achieved.

I'm not expecting it to be a literary event, but I'm hoping Johnny covers the Smiths years in a bit more detail, and with a whole lot less negativity. It shouldn't be hard.
 

Detritus

Teenage Lightning
Given the eleven layers of obfuscation in Morrissey's book, I look forward to reading Johnny's take on things.
It's funny that they are both prima donnas and prone to cattiness.
Hell, I'd read Andy and Mike's, although probably just during my morning shits over the course of a year or two.

Honestly, one of the most enjoyable musician autobiographies I've read in a long time was David J's "Who Killed Mr. Moonlight."
I guarantee Peter Murphy and Daniel Ash couldn't pen anything remotely as insightful or good, given that they were always boxing one another for a larger share of the spotlight. David J. comes across as a keen observer, and with a hilarious sense of humor about the whole works.
I wish Morrissey would have attempted to not be so overly florid with his, but well... You know.
I loved that book and shared some thoughts about it in the "recommend something, anything" a while back. Definitely one of the most enjoyable and fascinating memoirs I've ever ready by anyone, not just a musician. I especially loved the anecdotes about staying with Genesis P-Orridge at Rick Rubin's house and the ensuing lawsuit/court proceedings. I'm a big fan of both David J and Gen, and it's an odd period of overlap in their careers and lives that I've always found really interesting but that neither of them have really gone into too much detail about.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Whilst I enjoyed a lot of Morrissey autobiography (particularly the stuff regarding his childhood), the Smiths sections were pretty disappointing. He spent most of his time whinging about chart positions, and how shit Geoff Travis and Rough Trade were, and vastly more pages bitching about the court case than on what the band actually achieved.

I'm not expecting it to be a literary event, but I'm hoping Johnny covers the Smiths years in a bit more detail, and with a whole lot less negativity. It shouldn't be hard.

true it was very annoying travis this travis that. travis didnt buy him lunch. tavis didnt congratulate with sufficient enthusiasm.
travis travis travis.

he probably didnt speak at length about the music since johnny was the one that worked it up in the studio while moz sat around in the studio thinking up reasons for whinge....someone was eating pork brisket etc
 
Whilst I enjoyed a lot of Morrissey autobiography (particularly the stuff regarding his childhood), the Smiths sections were pretty disappointing. He spent most of his time whinging about chart positions, and how shit Geoff Travis and Rough Trade were, and vastly more pages bitching about the court case than on what the band actually achieved.

I'm not expecting it to be a literary event, but I'm hoping Johnny covers the Smiths years in a bit more detail, and with a whole lot less negativity. It shouldn't be hard.

I think The Smiths section in Johnnys autobiography will turn out to be shorter and most likely more bland than the section in Morrisseys. Even though most people would prefer to hear Johnny bad mouth Moz, johnny doesn't seem like the type to pander.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Reckon he has read it, probably fuming with parts of it, the court case in particular! I cant wait to read Johns book, would imagine that theirs a lot of pages about the Smiths, and probably a few home truths about Morrissey no doubt
 

bhops

Last of the famous international screw ups.
Really, they ought to have worked on a book together, because neither of their lives would have been half as interesting without the other.

If they'd worked on it together no doubt Mike Joyce would've wanted 25% of the royalties :lbf:
 

bhops

Last of the famous international screw ups.
Whilst I enjoyed a lot of Morrissey autobiography (particularly the stuff regarding his childhood), the Smiths sections were pretty disappointing. He spent most of his time whinging about chart positions, and how shit Geoff Travis and Rough Trade were, and vastly more pages bitching about the court case than on what the band actually achieved.

I'm not expecting it to be a literary event, but I'm hoping Johnny covers the Smiths years in a bit more detail, and with a whole lot less negativity. It shouldn't be hard.

See I thought The Smiths part were really funny, pure comedy gold, although I would have loved to have heard more about how he Johnny actually constructed the songs. There are a couple of points that i would be interested in hearing Johnny personally respond to, the main one being after the court case did he ever suggest reforming the Smiths? In terms of reappraising the history of The Smiths Johnny has made something of a career painting himself as 'the honest one' out of the two. And since the court case he has steadfastly commented that he would NEVER reform The Smiths so for Morrissey to make the bold pronouncement that Johnny approached him suggesting a reformation means someone is lying. I'd be curious to see if Johnny rejects Morrissey's statement outright or whether he fudges.
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
I loved that book and shared some thoughts about it in the "recommend something, anything" a while back. Definitely one of the most enjoyable and fascinating memoirs I've ever ready by anyone, not just a musician. I especially loved the anecdotes about staying with Genesis P-Orridge at Rick Rubin's house and the ensuing lawsuit/court proceedings. I'm a big fan of both David J and Gen, and it's an odd period of overlap in their careers and lives that I've always found really interesting but that neither of them have really gone into too much detail about.

Honestly, I was wondering if the post-Bauhaus portion of the book was going to drag, and was pleasantly surprised to find that it was actually even more entertaining to read. He was always the most enigmatic part of Bauhaus, and it was supremely refreshing to find out what a healthy attitude he has.

I have tickets to see Psychic TV in December. I'm pretty excited for that one! David J is coming through Portland in january to easily one of the best venues in town, and I would love to get my copy signed and to thank him for the read. I just wonder if it's the appropriate time to do so.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Really, they ought to have worked on a book together, because neither of their lives would have been half as interesting without the other.

You should collaborate with paint drying on a wall when you write yours.
 

Ketamine Sun

HANG THEM HIGH VERONICA
Whilst I enjoyed a lot of Morrissey autobiography (particularly the stuff regarding his childhood), the Smiths sections were pretty disappointing. He spent most of his time whinging about chart positions, and how shit Geoff Travis and Rough Trade were, and vastly more pages bitching about the court case than on what the band actually achieved.

I'm not expecting it to be a literary event, but I'm hoping Johnny covers the Smiths years in a bit more detail, and with a whole lot less negativity. It shouldn't be hard.

:thumb:

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I loved that book and shared some thoughts about it in the "recommend something, anything" a while back. Definitely one of the most enjoyable and fascinating memoirs I've ever ready by anyone, not just a musician. I especially loved the anecdotes about staying with Genesis P-Orridge at Rick Rubin's house and the ensuing lawsuit/court proceedings. I'm a big fan of both David J and Gen, and it's an odd period of overlap in their careers and lives that I've always found really interesting but that neither of them have really gone into too much detail about.

<>Genesis/Genius <> all is all....

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Nice to see you still make the most unnecessary comments in threads tyronepowebottom

:thumb:
 

Poet

Banned
Johnny Marr is a complete asshole with a taste for the little ones. This will be revealed in the book. Everyone has always been poor Johnny, but Johnny was convinced he was the greatest thing ever, spurred on by his c*** wife Angie, who is the real cause of the Smiths breakup. As it turns out, Johnny is not the greatest thing ever and in fact needs Morrissey to achieve any significant success and he "f***in" knows it.

"I would lose both of my legs, if it meant you could be free." BUT

YOU

CAN'T!
 

Ketamine Sun

HANG THEM HIGH VERONICA
I think The Smiths section in Johnnys autobiography will turn out to be shorter and most likely more bland than the section in Morrisseys. Even though most people would prefer to hear Johnny bad mouth Moz, johnny doesn't seem like the type to pander.

Hope not. Do really want to hear a bit of the studio tech talk,And how this song or the sound of a piece and it's creation came about,what influenced what song, etc. More about the bond between them, the records they shared,
vibe of the two during the process of writing, etc. We'll see...

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If they'd worked on it together no doubt Mike Joyce would've wanted 25% of the royalties :lbf:


ha,right. :lbf:

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Honestly, I was wondering if the post-Bauhaus portion of the book was going to drag, and was pleasantly surprised to find that it was actually even more entertaining to read. He was always the most enigmatic part of Bauhaus, and it was supremely refreshing to find out what a healthy attitude he has.

I have tickets to see Psychic TV in December. I'm pretty excited for that one! David J is coming through Portland in january to easily one of the best venues in town, and I would love to get my copy signed and to thank him for the read. I just wonder if it's the appropriate time to do so.


oh just get it signed. :)

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Johnny Marr is a complete asshole with a taste for the little ones. This will be revealed in the book. Everyone has always been poor Johnny, but Johnny was convinced he was the greatest thing ever, spurred on by his c*** wife Angie, who is the real cause of the Smiths breakup. As it turns out, Johnny is not the greatest thing ever and in fact needs Morrissey to achieve any significant success and he "f***in" knows it.

"I would lose both of my legs, if it meant you could be free." BUT

YOU

CAN'T!

...oh my.
 
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Ketamine Sun

HANG THEM HIGH VERONICA
I'm gonna read his book, but a part of me wishes he had written his autobiography right after the smiths' split or a few years after that, when he wasn't as diplomatic about moz and seemed more honest :straightface:

.....because you feel...that he won't be honest now? That he's not able like M to write an honest book ? Could be.

It's so easy to be nasty/honest when one is young and on fire.
 
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Ketamine Sun

HANG THEM HIGH VERONICA
Tony the Pony: great tune, great singing, great vocal melody, great poetry - from brilliant KILL UNCLE period. Fantastic song indeed!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7wSUke2X0A

now hold on there!...take it easy, KILL UNCLE is an album with brilliant songs on it, YES. But (my opinion here)
the production is a bit underwhelming. A bit too soft/warm/a bit too 'toy time' (if that makes sense) at times.

Now... JUST IMAGINE IF M.RONSON mixed&produced 'Kill Uncle' !?

Oh let me dream............ :)
 
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Johnny Marr is a complete asshole with a taste for the little ones. This will be revealed in the book. Everyone has always been poor Johnny, but Johnny was convinced he was the greatest thing ever, spurred on by his c*** wife Angie, who is the real cause of the Smiths breakup. As it turns out, Johnny is not the greatest thing ever and in fact needs Morrissey to achieve any significant success and he "f***in" knows it.

"I would lose both of my legs, if it meant you could be free." BUT

YOU

CAN'T!

wow smh @ this comment!!! also, lol plz explain why Angie is the real cause of the Smiths breakup?
 
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