Johnny Marr at Patti Smith's Meltdown & a Morrissey mention

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Tingle

Guest
Johnny appeared at the Meltdown Festival curated by Patti Smith at a show called 'US-UK Folk Connections'. I say that it was curated by Patti Smith, but she acknowledges that she had a 'sub-curator' for this show in the form of Lenny Kaye. The show featured musicians from the US and the UK and indeed other parts of the globe. I nearly said 'English speaking' parts, but Rhys Jones from the Superfurry Animals who sang a Welsh folk song.

Bert Jansch played a couple of songs half way through the first half or the 4 hour concert. He then invited Johnny Marr on stage, to almost embarassingly loud applause, who sat to Bert's left as they both played acoustic guitar. Johnny was dressed in blue jeans, a brown T-shirt and a black leather-lookingt jacket. He looked very young - like he's hardly aged at all, though I couldn't help the feeling that one day he might look like this man www.sterlingtimes.org/ed_stewart2.jpg . The songs he played with Bert were, I think "Pretty Sarah" and "Pretty Polly".

They both left the stage and then Johnny's band returned, followed by Johnny. Johnny didn't get much a of welcome - in fact he said something like "It's very quiet here", but then he had only just left the stage. The first tune was an instrumental that I recall being something like "Money Changes Everything" i.e. a tune looking for a lyric. Next he said "We're now gonna try a Mancunian folk song". The intro wasn't the same as the 'Please Please Please let me get what I want' that we know and love - it was longer - but before he started singing tears were welling in my eyes and I knew what he was going to sing. It was an emotional experience, but because Johnny was playing electric guitar and there were two other guitars and a drummer involved, it didn't have the same tenderness as 'William's' b-side. It was longer than the 1 minute 50 seconds - He repeated the last verse I think. He then played 2 other tunes, one of which may have been by Jackson C. Frank

After Johnny and the Healers was the interval. In the second half of the show Robyn Hitchcock appeared with someone called John Paul Jones. They played a Bob Dylan tune and Hitchcock described Dylan as being "the link between George Formby and Morrissey", which got a laugh. I think he said something else about Morrissey but I can't recall what exactly.

Neil Finn played too and invited Johnny back on stage. Thank God they didn't sing "Weather with you" which would've ruined my evening. I think that was all from Johnny until the finale (after a tedious and over-long set from Roy Harper). Nearly everyone was on stage either playing or singing huddled round a microphone with an A4 sheet of lyrics in hand. Johnny led the finale and sang the first verse I think. The song went something like "lay my baby down". Patti Smith was to Johnny's left and was earnestly singing along and bouncing around like an embarrassing auntie. Roy Harper sand a verse at Johnny's mic and I think Johnny playfully kissed him on the cheak as he finished. *bleah!*

I loved 'Please, Please....' but I could've done without the final thing - he seemed to be carrying the show and particularly the finale, perhaps, you could say, like he carried much of the weight of The Smiths on his shoulders.
 
N

Nick

Guest
Thanks for the review!

Someone had mentioned the "Please Please Please..." thing a night ago, but I didn't know if it was a wind-up or not.

That's great to hear, I'm hoping for an mp3.

Does this mean that Johnny might start including the occasional Smiths song in his live repertoire?
 
G

Grim O'Grady

Guest
cheers Tingle, when I saw Johnny a few months ago (not the Deltas gig btw) I asked him why didn't he do more Smiths songs at his healers gigs, he told me then that there was only Meat is Murder that he could associate with, the rest were all Morrisseys words & didn't really mean anything to him so he couldn't sing them, so maybe he listened to me eh?

Grim

> Johnny appeared at the Meltdown Festival curated by Patti Smith at a show
> called 'US-UK Folk Connections'. I say that it was curated by Patti Smith,
> but she acknowledges that she had a 'sub-curator' for this show in the
> form of Lenny Kaye. The show featured musicians from the US and the UK and
> indeed other parts of the globe. I nearly said 'English speaking' parts,
> but Rhys Jones from the Superfurry Animals who sang a Welsh folk song.

> Bert Jansch played a couple of songs half way through the first half or
> the 4 hour concert. He then invited Johnny Marr on stage, to almost
> embarassingly loud applause, who sat to Bert's left as they both played
> acoustic guitar. Johnny was dressed in blue jeans, a brown T-shirt and a
> black leather-lookingt jacket. He looked very young - like he's hardly
> aged at all, though I couldn't help the feeling that one day he might look
> like this man www.sterlingtimes.org/ed_stewart2.jpg . The songs he
> played with Bert were, I think "Pretty Sarah" and "Pretty
> Polly".

> They both left the stage and then Johnny's band returned, followed by
> Johnny. Johnny didn't get much a of welcome - in fact he said something
> like "It's very quiet here", but then he had only just left the
> stage. The first tune was an instrumental that I recall being something
> like "Money Changes Everything" i.e. a tune looking for a lyric.
> Next he said "We're now gonna try a Mancunian folk song". The
> intro wasn't the same as the 'Please Please Please let me get what I want'
> that we know and love - it was longer - but before he started singing
> tears were welling in my eyes and I knew what he was going to sing. It was
> an emotional experience, but because Johnny was playing electric guitar
> and there were two other guitars and a drummer involved, it didn't have
> the same tenderness as 'William's' b-side. It was longer than the 1 minute
> 50 seconds - He repeated the last verse I think. He then played 2 other
> tunes, one of which may have been by Jackson C. Frank

> After Johnny and the Healers was the interval. In the second half of the
> show Robyn Hitchcock appeared with someone called John Paul Jones. They
> played a Bob Dylan tune and Hitchcock described Dylan as being "the
> link between George Formby and Morrissey", which got a laugh. I think
> he said something else about Morrissey but I can't recall what exactly.

> Neil Finn played too and invited Johnny back on stage. Thank God they
> didn't sing "Weather with you" which would've ruined my evening.
> I think that was all from Johnny until the finale (after a tedious and
> over-long set from Roy Harper). Nearly everyone was on stage either
> playing or singing huddled round a microphone with an A4 sheet of lyrics
> in hand. Johnny led the finale and sang the first verse I think. The song
> went something like "lay my baby down". Patti Smith was to
> Johnny's left and was earnestly singing along and bouncing around like an
> embarrassing auntie. Roy Harper sand a verse at Johnny's mic and I think
> Johnny playfully kissed him on the cheak as he finished. *bleah!*

> I loved 'Please, Please....' but I could've done without the final thing -
> he seemed to be carrying the show and particularly the finale, perhaps,
> you could say, like he carried much of the weight of The Smiths on his
> shoulders.
 
I

I Had a Love

Guest
John Paul Jones = legendary bass player for Led Zeppelin

Quoth Tingle:
> After Johnny and the Healers was the interval. In the second half of the
> show Robyn Hitchcock appeared with someone called John Paul Jones.

Oh dear - not a classic rock fan, are you? That's okay. Roy Harper is a long-time friend of Zeppelin too (but you didn't like him either)!

Thanks for the review; it's great to hear about Johnny.
 
T

Tingle

Guest
Re: John Paul Jones

>not a classic rock fan, are you? I'm just so-oo young.

ABSOLUTELY-I'm not!, though I did rather enjoy hearing 'Whole lotta love' on the 'Sounds of the Sixties' radio show last Saturday. My knowledge of Deep Purple, Led Zep etc is very very limited.

Glad you appreciated the review. Sorry about the bad spelling & grammar.

> Quoth Tingle:

> Oh dear - classic rock fan, are you? That's okay. Roy Harper is a
> long-time friend of Zeppelin too (but you didn't like him either)!

> Thanks for the review; it's great to hear about Johnny.
 
T

Tingle

Guest
Re: Come to think of it, Led Zep were mentioned

When Lenny Kaye introduced Robyn Hitchcock he said that he'd seen the Softboys (Hitchcock's earlier band) at the [insert name of club] in New York. When Hitchcock and Jones appeared on stage Hitchcock said 'but did you see Led Zeppelin there?' Went over my head obviously!

> ABSOLUTELY-I'm not!, though I did rather enjoy hearing 'Whole lotta love'
> on the 'Sounds of the Sixties' radio show last Saturday. My knowledge of
> Deep Purple, Led Zep etc is very very limited.

> Glad you appreciated the review. Sorry about the bad spelling &
> grammar.
 
S

seriously sectioned but who cares

Guest
Sinful.

>Then as it was, then again it will be
An' though the course may change sometimes
Rivers always reach the sea
Blind stars of fortune, each have several rays
On the wings of maybe, downing birds of prey
Kind of makes me feel sometimes, didn't have to grow
But as the eagle leaves the nest, it's got so far to go

Changes fill my time, baby, that's alright with me
In the midst I think of you, and how it used to be

Did you ever really need somebody, And really need 'em bad
Did you ever really want somebody, The best love you ever had
Do you ever remember me, baby, did it feel so good
'Cause it was just the first time, And you knew you would

Through the eyes an' I sparkle, Senses growing keen
Taste your love along the way, See your feathers preen
Kind of makes makes me feel sometimes, Didn't have to grow
We are eagles of one nest, The nest is in our soul

Vixen in my dreams, with great surprise to me
Never thought I'd see your face the way it used to be
Oh darlin', oh darlin'

I'm never gonna leave you. I never gonna leave
Holdin' on, ten years gone
Ten years gone, holdin' on, ten years gone

Quoth Tingle:

> Oh dear - not a classic rock fan, are you? That's okay. Roy Harper is a
> long-time friend of Zeppelin too (but you didn't like him either)!

> Thanks for the review; it's great to hear about Johnny.
 
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