Johnny Marr – Fever Dreams, Pt. 1 EP (2021)

NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH #FBPB

Ketamine Sun

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Ugh. I’m sure Morrissey finds the humor in selling signed albums of artists that have shaped his life. And unlike Marr, it’s something that only Morrissey can pull off, it’s a kind of humor that seems to be lost on many here.
 
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Vegan Cro Spirit 444

Guest
:lbf:

none of his trolls have money for a meet and greet. :lbf:
what a katastrofa thats going to be. :hammer:
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Ugh. I’m sure Morrissey finds the humor in selling signed albums of artists that have shaped his life. And unlike Marr, it’s something that only Morrissey can pull off, it’s a kind of humor that seems to be lost on many here.

Yeah, that sure was "funny"! A joke that costs $300!
 
V

vegan cro spirit .777

Guest
:rolleyes:
SHANDA! how low can he go? :raisedhands:

you can sell the moz autographed album on ebay for triple on ebay/dicogs, even the fredo fakes
go for double. nobody will pay a quid for a meet and greet with :handpointright::guardsman::handpointleft:; the usual twat touts
will claim but everyone in :frogface: street is on the dole :hammer:
 
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Anonymous

Guest

ALBUM REVIEWS

JOHNNY MARR : FEVER DREAMS, PT. 1​

17abd918e5263bf72d101de4aaded39e

BY WIL LEWELLYN
OCTOBER 21, 2021
Johnny Marr Fever Dreams Pt 1 review

Johnny Marr is one of the most important guitarists of the ’80s, having created a sound -unburdened by the era it helped define. That timeless element is often the keystone to great music, enduring beyond the present moment. When the former The The guitarist invokes his classic sound on Fever Dreams, Pt. 1, that timeless element prevails here. When the ex-guitarist of Electronic opens this album with a compelling groove, it doesn’t necessarily make you recall his days with Bernard Sumner either. Nor does it recall his more recent work with Modest Mouse.
There is, of course, no way to go forward without addressing the elephant in the room that casts its shadow on this album as a ten-ton influence. This is Johnny Marr from The Smiths, and while on one hand the press release for this first of four installments to be compiled into a 2022 album might downplay this fact, but do not let Rick Astley try crooning one of the old tunes or Marr will be forced to stand up for his legacy. The Smiths laid the groundwork for indie rock, though not as foundational of an impact as the band on Marr himself as the sound he helped create is in the DNA of this record, but without leaning on it so heavily that it becomes a distraction.
The song that most immediately recalls his legendary days is “All These Days.” It is one of the album’s darker moments with a more dramatic pulse to it, and Marr is a decent singer, despite not having the unmistakable croon of his more infamous former bandmate. Marr can still work his way around a vocal melody, but with a fraction of the emotive pageantry. His strongest tones still come from his guitar, and on “Ariel,” that classic tone emerges. The guitar is often understated on this album, which considering his legacy, comes off as a bit surprising. However, the musical flow of the compositions here give him plenty of room to maneuver melodically.
Though more electronic window dressing adorns this album, Marr’s classic jangle returns for “Receiver,” with vocals reminiscent of Iggy Pop’s new wave days or Billy Idol’s least rock moments. You can also hear echoes of some of his earliest roots and influences, like T. Rex and The New York Dolls. Though Marr’s catalog is a lot to live up to, the fact remains that he’s one of the best guitarists from his generation, and his instincts keep Fever Dreams, Pt. 1 consistently interesting and highly enjoyable in its best moments. It’s grown on me with each listen, and fans of his inimitable guitar style from any of his many projects will find something worth latching onto.


Label: BMG
Year: 2021
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Perceptive review of Marr's latest and its, uh, "shortcomings," from the Arts Desk:


"In truth, forensic attention to Marr’s lyrics does him few favours. There’s a sense of automatic writing, of glinting phrases inspired by literary and rock’n’roll arcana, the Beats and Es, assembled with heartfelt, magpie enthusiasm. Like his autobiography, Set the Boy Free, which sometimes described intensely dramatic events with numb, maybe Zen distance, they lack the intimate heat of emotional self-exposure, beyond Marr’s love of rock culture itself. Morrissey’s more tortured, piercing romanticism is the songwriting characteristic lost with The Smiths."
 
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Disco Robot

Guest
Perceptive review of Marr's latest and its, uh, "shortcomings," from the Arts Desk:


"In truth, forensic attention to Marr’s lyrics does him few favours. There’s a sense of automatic writing, of glinting phrases inspired by literary and rock’n’roll arcana, the Beats and Es, assembled with heartfelt, magpie enthusiasm. Like his autobiography, Set the Boy Free, which sometimes described intensely dramatic events with numb, maybe Zen distance, they lack the intimate heat of emotional self-exposure, beyond Marr’s love of rock culture itself. Morrissey’s more tortured, piercing romanticism is the songwriting characteristic lost with The Smiths."
Sounds like the songs the reviewer liked the best are from parts 3 and 4. I've tended to prefer the 2nd half on all of Marr's solo records, so this stands to reason.
 

Surface

Chilling in Cheshire.
Perceptive review of Marr's latest and its, uh, "shortcomings," from the Arts Desk:


"In truth, forensic attention to Marr’s lyrics does him few favours. There’s a sense of automatic writing, of glinting phrases inspired by literary and rock’n’roll arcana, the Beats and Es, assembled with heartfelt, magpie enthusiasm. Like his autobiography, Set the Boy Free, which sometimes described intensely dramatic events with numb, maybe Zen distance, they lack the intimate heat of emotional self-exposure, beyond Marr’s love of rock culture itself. Morrissey’s more tortured, piercing romanticism is the songwriting characteristic lost with The Smiths."

4/5 stars as well, same as Mojo review
 
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