It’s not about politics

T

Trans

Guest
Doesn’t Parlor make you scan your government id to login or something. I mean that can’t be a good thing
 

bhops

Last of the famous international screw ups.
Would I really find cats & theatre on GAB?
Just checked there is a Cats group that has 29K members and growing, LOL. Didn't check theatre, but I'm pretty sure if you can find cats on GAB you can prolly find theatre on it too.
 

Fake C

Active Member
It’s all a part of the show.

you either get sucked into it and become miserable (though so few know that they are)

or ignore it all as best you can and be a more creative and healthy human being


Regarding where one puts their attention


there is a choice.
If we were miserable, "how could we really know?"
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
What is this horrendous cover!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ew.jpg


Previously I'd only seen this one:

man.jpg
 

Ketamine Sun

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What is this horrendous cover!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

View attachment 67424

Previously I'd only seen this one:

View attachment 67425

‘Bowie’s third LP was going to be called Metrobolist, a play on Fritz Lang’s Metropolis: it was the title of Mike Weller’s proposed cover illustration, a Letterist cartoon in which a man (whose image was based on a photo of John Wayne) walking past Cane Hill Asylum and carrying a rifle offers an aside in a speech bubble whose words have been erased. It originally read, according to Weller, “ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES, TAKE A LOOK AT YOUR ARMS.”

‘Bowie’s family, on his mother’s side, was riddled with mental illness: his aunt Una was institutionalized after a breakdown and died in her late twenties; another aunt was diagnosed with manic-depressive psychosis and lobotomized; a third had schizophrenic episodes. Then there was his mother’s son, his half-brother Terry Burns, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. (In 1966, while Bowie and Burns were walking to a Cream concert, Burns fell to the street and screamed, claiming he saw flames rising up from cracks in the pavement.) When Bowie recorded The Man Who Sold the World, Burns was a regular ward at Cane Hill, a Victorian-era psychiatric hospital in Croydon, and occasionally released to stay at Haddon Hall on weekends.

At times, Bowie seemed to believe he had considerable odds of going mad. The prospect bled into his work—all the lyrics about identity, control and insanity, the devising of various personae as means of escape, writing songs as conduits. “One puts oneself through such psychological damage in trying to avoid the threat of insanity,” he recalled in 1993. “As long as I could push these psychological excesses through into my music, into my work, then I could always be throwing it off.”



Definitely worth a read ....



 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
‘Bowie’s third LP was going to be called Metrobolist, a play on Fritz Lang’s Metropolis: it was the title of Mike Weller’s proposed cover illustration, a Letterist cartoon in which a man (whose image was based on a photo of John Wayne) walking past Cane Hill Asylum and carrying a rifle offers an aside in a speech bubble whose words have been erased. It originally read, according to Weller, “ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES, TAKE A LOOK AT YOUR ARMS.”

‘Bowie’s family, on his mother’s side, was riddled with mental illness: his aunt Una was institutionalized after a breakdown and died in her late twenties; another aunt was diagnosed with manic-depressive psychosis and lobotomized; a third had schizophrenic episodes. Then there was his mother’s son, his half-brother Terry Burns, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. (In 1966, while Bowie and Burns were walking to a Cream concert, Burns fell to the street and screamed, claiming he saw flames rising up from cracks in the pavement.) When Bowie recorded The Man Who Sold the World, Burns was a regular ward at Cane Hill, a Victorian-era psychiatric hospital in Croydon, and occasionally released to stay at Haddon Hall on weekends.

At times, Bowie seemed to believe he had considerable odds of going mad. The prospect bled into his work—all the lyrics about identity, control and insanity, the devising of various personae as means of escape, writing songs as conduits. “One puts oneself through such psychological damage in trying to avoid the threat of insanity,” he recalled in 1993. “As long as I could push these psychological excesses through into my music, into my work, then I could always be throwing it off.”



Definitely worth a read ....




That's interesting. I've never looked into the backstories of Bowie's albums beyond what turns up in the press.
 

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchback of Solow
Subscriber
‘Bowie’s third LP was going to be called Metrobolist, a play on Fritz Lang’s Metropolis: it was the title of Mike Weller’s proposed cover illustration, a Letterist cartoon in which a man (whose image was based on a photo of John Wayne) walking past Cane Hill Asylum and carrying a rifle offers an aside in a speech bubble whose words have been erased. It originally read, according to Weller, “ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES, TAKE A LOOK AT YOUR ARMS.”

‘Bowie’s family, on his mother’s side, was riddled with mental illness: his aunt Una was institutionalized after a breakdown and died in her late twenties; another aunt was diagnosed with manic-depressive psychosis and lobotomized; a third had schizophrenic episodes. Then there was his mother’s son, his half-brother Terry Burns, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. (In 1966, while Bowie and Burns were walking to a Cream concert, Burns fell to the street and screamed, claiming he saw flames rising up from cracks in the pavement.) When Bowie recorded The Man Who Sold the World, Burns was a regular ward at Cane Hill, a Victorian-era psychiatric hospital in Croydon, and occasionally released to stay at Haddon Hall on weekends.

At times, Bowie seemed to believe he had considerable odds of going mad. The prospect bled into his work—all the lyrics about identity, control and insanity, the devising of various personae as means of escape, writing songs as conduits. “One puts oneself through such psychological damage in trying to avoid the threat of insanity,” he recalled in 1993. “As long as I could push these psychological excesses through into my music, into my work, then I could always be throwing it off.”



Definitely worth a read ....



I'm not too crazy about Bowie usually, but this was interesting to hear. The song, I mean.
 
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