Is Coronavirus as serious as they say?

Verso

Well-Known Member
I have more morals than any qualified doctor who lies to their patients about this obvious scam. Which is a f-ing lot of them. The NHS has bought this sham wholesale. They know full well that a flu of this type is no danger whatsoever to the vast majority of the public - yet they go along with their masters.

That sickens me - but it has been very educational.

I now would trust a homeless bum on the street with my loaded purse more then i would anybody in any form of authority anywhere.
Speaking of shams, are we really to believe that you’re in your late-20s/early-30s? Be honest: you’re actually 14, right?
 

reelfountain

On Timeout
Speaking of shams, are we really to believe that you’re in your late-20s/early-30s? Be honest: you’re actually 14, right?
I've said many times that I see myself as an uncorrupted child - and am very proud of that.

You can't fool children. They're unjaded and they use their eyes.

They know.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
I've said many times that I see myself as an uncorrupted child - and am very proud of that.

You can't fool children. They're unjaded and they use their eyes.

They know.
I assure that absolutely no one here gives a shit about your warped self-perception.
 

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchbacked Smut Peddler
It's difficult to get into a psyche ward in England since Thatcher sold them off and these grand old gothic asylums were converted into luxury housing for footballers and millionaire actors.

All the nutters in London are walking proudly on the streets.

What I was doing during my sabbatical is secret. But I will reveal this: it was artistic and extremely rewarding.
I bet it was.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Well done. But luck played a part in your success - it's not all about effort. That's my point. A person can give their all and still not succeed. A traditional Tory would say "No, you didn't try hard enough" whereas a left winger would say "it's because you're disadvantaged - a woman, black, disabled, working class etc". Those are the two extremes. My opinion is somewhere in the middle.

You'll have someone like Noel Gallagher say "Oasis made it because we worked our arses off and were the best band out there". 'Best' is always subjective, but Oasis certainly didn't make it due to particularly hard work either. Noel had good contacts (he was an Inspiral Carpets friend and roadie and he lived with a woman in the music biz etc). The magic of luck plays a part in all success stories to one extent or another.
It worried me when I saw a photo of Liam Gallagher and Jimmy Savile. If you do a Google image search you should find the photo.

A guy called Mark Devlin has written books exposing the music industry. There are books, YouTube videos, Blogs, websites and so on.. trying to expose the music industry.

There are probably artists out there with just as much talent and would work just as hard as say 'Oasis' did or Katy Perry. It can't be just about having connections, knowing the right people, networking, building up a fan base and promotion all of that stuff might take you so far. Why were 'Oasis' rich and famous and one of the biggest bands in the 1990s and part of that "Cool Britainia" thing? This was before social media took off. Record companies and managers would want to make money. I think it is has to be about more than just money though.
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
Sorry to hear that, I hope you'll be ok.
I'm ok. I had worst flu than this one. Since 2008 I've been catching all of them, including the worst I ever had in 2018. But I've heard you can reinfect, so maybe the second time is worst. Who knows. Not the WHO.
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
I'm hoping that this nonsense will end shortly. I'm thinking that it might be for the best that we need to be pushed so far before we nip this nonsense in the bud. We had a comprehensive report that came to the conclusion that the UK wasn't institutionally racist. It was over 200 pages long. Somehow, by magic, the next day we were told they'd come to the wrong conclusion. There were many instances of racism in the report, but the overall finding was that the UK is not institutionally racist. There were a good deal of people from ethnic minorities who took part in the report. Totally independent. So we had the report but it still wasn't good enough for some people. They still feel they need to be racially abused. You can have an independent report saying that my country isn't inherently racist, but it's still not good enough. You want to try living in the USA. I've seen real division there. When it comes to the UK though, I watched black, brown, white and yellow people dancing in the park last week when covid rules were relaxed and there was no discrimination. Everyone was enjoying themselves together. We're not perfect in this country but you wouldn't find this level of tolerance in many other parts of the world, I don't think. There were more black and Asian people around than white people, last Monday on the park. The fact that white people were readily mixing didn't seem to get reported.
If a government talks about "white" people or "black" people is eminently racist. If someone says human races exist is a racist. If someone says "I have a black (latin, brown, yellow, etc) friend so I'm not a racist", that person is the worst kind of racist. The hypocrite racist.
 

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchbacked Smut Peddler
If a government talks about "white" people or "black" people is eminently racist. If someone says human races exist is a racist. If someone says "I have a black (latin, brown, yellow, etc) friend so I'm not a racist", that person is the worst kind of racist. The hypocrite racist.
I disagree.
 

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchbacked Smut Peddler
I think I understand what you mean though. But, I noticed that the black girls in elementary school had a more fun vibe than other ethnicities. Keith School, all the black girls hung out exclusively together, and I admired them from outside their circle.

Then when I was moved to a different school, I only had two friends, both black. Yemisi, and Judy. Yemisi and I would dance to my Star Wars record, and eat plantain her mother would cook for us. Judy was a latchkey kid, and became a stuck up stripper. I don't know what Yemisi ended up doing, because I got moved to a foster home far away and the father was abusive, which upset my social life tremendously.
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
I think I understand what you mean though. But, I noticed that the black girls in elementary school had a more fun vibe than other ethnicities. Keith School, all the black girls hung out exclusively together, and I admired them from outside their circle.

Then when I was moved to a different school, I only had two friends, both black. Yemisi, and Judy. Yemisi and I would dance to my Star Wars record, and eat plantain her mother would cook for us. Judy was a latchkey kid, and became a stuck up stripper. I don't know what Yemisi ended up doing, because I got moved to a foster home far away and the father was abusive, which upset my social life tremendously.
I think you don't understand me. I would never waste a second of my time thinking about the skin color of my school friends because thanks God that never mattered.

But this thread is about coronavirus. It's just another kind of strong flu if you are ok. Maybe it is very serious if you are already ill, like any other kind of strong flu. I do think it has been planted everywhere. Why?
 

Light Housework

Meowissey, Hunchbacked Smut Peddler
I think you don't understand me. I would never waste a second of my time thinking about the skin color of my school friends because thanks God that never mattered.

But this thread is about coronavirus. It's just another kind of strong flu if you are ok. Maybe it is very serious if you are already ill, like any other kind of strong flu. I do think it has been planted everywhere. Why?
I think I had swine flu back in 2009 or so, for 5 weeks. I was bedridden for about 4.5 of those weeks, but after it, I was healthier than before it.
 

The.Truth.

about Ruth
I think I understand what you mean though. But, I noticed that the black girls in elementary school had a more fun vibe than other ethnicities. Keith School, all the black girls hung out exclusively together, and I admired them from outside their circle.

Then when I was moved to a different school, I only had two friends, both black. Yemisi, and Judy. Yemisi and I would dance to my Star Wars record, and eat plantain her mother would cook for us. Judy was a latchkey kid, and became a stuck up stripper. I don't know what Yemisi ended up doing, because I got moved to a foster home far away and the father was abusive, which upset my social life tremendously.
In your stories everyone eventually becomes a stripper.
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
I think I had swine flu back in 2009 or so, for 5 weeks. I was bedridden for about 4.5 of those weeks, but after it, I was healthier than before it.
Perhaps it was 2009, I don't remember the exact year. I catched it from a friend that came back from Panama in April (I do remember the month) and came directly to my house and we drank mate. I only remember I couldn't be in bed the whole time it lasted because I had a lot of responsibilities during those years. I could not stop because a lot of people depended on me. I remember I was driving and I almost caused a car crash because I almost fainted. That was very irresponsible in the end.
 

rifke

team bougatsa
god, that sounds so good. i wish i could get the flu. i hope this isnt the end of all viruses.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
It worried me when I saw a photo of Liam Gallagher and Jimmy Savile. If you do a Google image search you should find the photo.

A guy called Mark Devlin has written books exposing the music industry. There are books, YouTube videos, Blogs, websites and so on.. trying to expose the music industry.

There are probably artists out there with just as much talent and would work just as hard as say 'Oasis' did or Katy Perry. It can't be just about having connections, knowing the right people, networking, building up a fan base and promotion all of that stuff might take you so far. Why were 'Oasis' rich and famous and one of the biggest bands in the 1990s and part of that "Cool Britainia" thing? This was before social media took off. Record companies and managers would want to make money. I think it is has to be about more than just money though.
I meant "Cool Britannia" not Cool Britainia it was a typo. I question why a band like 'Oasis' were heavily promoted in the media and music press and became a big thing in Britain and others places around the world? I question the motivation of why someone joins a band. Is it to become famous and a celebrity? Is it to make money and a way out of poverty and a life they don't like? Is it to become more popular have influential friends and hang out with other celebrities? Is it about ego and being on stage? Is it about hedonism? Is it about having a romantic relationship finding love? I notice that a lot of male rockstars have good-looking young model girlfriends and they often get divorced and have many different relationships and sometimes sleep around. Things have changed a bit with social media and the internet. There is possibly a darker side to the music industry and a spiritual element. Mark Devlin talks about this in his books. You get people in the music industry who come from working-class backgrounds, very poor and deprived backgrounds and broken homes, strange home situations and abusive backgrounds. 'Oasis' came from a tough working-class background and they didn't have much formal education. Mark Devlin thinks some might be from the right bloodline even if they are working-class and were very poor and deprived. There is also the question of 'image' what the band looks like. Some bands might have a lot of talent but they just don't have the right 'image' or create the type of mood or fashion or trend that the music industry wants to promote at that time. Katy Perry has a very strong image. From what I have heard from some women in the music industry there is still sexism in the industry. There must have been and still are many great musicians and singers who work hard that never made it or were born at the wrong time or were just in the wrong place at the wrong time. I guess also some people don't want to be stars and are happy to be in the background. It isn't just about loving music or having a passion for music. I don't really believe in luck but maybe luck has something to do with it. Would you say that 'Oasis' are lucky or fortunate to be where they are today?
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
T
I meant "Cool Britannia" not Cool Britainia it was a typo. I question why a band like 'Oasis' were heavily promoted in the media and music press and became a big thing in Britain and others places around the world? I question the motivation of why someone joins a band. Is it to become famous and a celebrity? Is it to make money and a way out of poverty and a life they don't like? Is it to become more popular have influential friends and hang out with other celebrities? Is it about ego and being on stage? Is it about hedonism? Is it about having a romantic relationship finding love? I notice that a lot of male rockstars have good-looking young model girlfriends and they often get divorced and have many different relationships and sometimes sleep around. Things have changed a bit with social media and the internet. There is possibly a darker side to the music industry and a spiritual element. Mark Devlin talks about this in his books. You get people in the music industry who come from working-class backgrounds, very poor and deprived backgrounds and broken homes, strange home situations and abusive backgrounds. 'Oasis' came from a tough working-class background and they didn't have much formal education. Mark Devlin thinks some might be from the right bloodline even if they are working-class and were very poor and deprived. There is also the question of 'image' what the band looks like. Some bands might have a lot of talent but they just don't have the right 'image' or create the type of mood or fashion or trend that the music industry wants to promote at that time. Katy Perry has a very strong image. From what I have heard from some women in the music industry there is still sexism in the industry. There must have been and still are many great musicians and singers who work hard that never made it or were born at the wrong time or were just in the wrong place at the wrong time. I guess also some people don't want to be stars and are happy to be in the background. It isn't just about loving music or having a passion for music. I don't really believe in luck but maybe luck has something to do with it. Would you say that 'Oasis' are lucky or fortunate to be where they are today?
They were at least fortunate that The Stone Roses took so long delivering their second album.
 

Surface

Vegan Cro’s parents regret the condom splitting
I meant "Cool Britannia" not Cool Britainia it was a typo. I question why a band like 'Oasis' were heavily promoted in the media and music press and became a big thing in Britain and others places around the world? I question the motivation of why someone joins a band. Is it to become famous and a celebrity? Is it to make money and a way out of poverty and a life they don't like? Is it to become more popular have influential friends and hang out with other celebrities? Is it about ego and being on stage? Is it about hedonism? Is it about having a romantic relationship finding love? I notice that a lot of male rockstars have good-looking young model girlfriends and they often get divorced and have many different relationships and sometimes sleep around. Things have changed a bit with social media and the internet. There is possibly a darker side to the music industry and a spiritual element. Mark Devlin talks about this in his books. You get people in the music industry who come from working-class backgrounds, very poor and deprived backgrounds and broken homes, strange home situations and abusive backgrounds. 'Oasis' came from a tough working-class background and they didn't have much formal education. Mark Devlin thinks some might be from the right bloodline even if they are working-class and were very poor and deprived. There is also the question of 'image' what the band looks like. Some bands might have a lot of talent but they just don't have the right 'image' or create the type of mood or fashion or trend that the music industry wants to promote at that time. Katy Perry has a very strong image. From what I have heard from some women in the music industry there is still sexism in the industry. There must have been and still are many great musicians and singers who work hard that never made it or were born at the wrong time or were just in the wrong place at the wrong time. I guess also some people don't want to be stars and are happy to be in the background. It isn't just about loving music or having a passion for music. I don't really believe in luck but maybe luck has something to do with it. Would you say that 'Oasis' are lucky or fortunate to be where they are today?

I think they struck a chord with music fans at the time and then rode the wave. They were lucky that Alan Mcgee spotted them when they begged to play at a Glasgow venue and Alan Mcgee was lucky he found them (and offered them a deal on the spot) as Creation weren't far off bankruptcy at the time.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
I think they struck a chord with music fans at the time and then rode the wave. They were lucky that Alan Mcgee spotted them when they begged to play at a Glasgow venue and Alan Mcgee was lucky he found them (and offered them a deal on the spot) as Creation weren't far off bankruptcy at the time.

I could cry about the great Manchester bands that missed out: Molly Half Head who I saw at The Roadhouse were great, but just had the one LP. Same with The Paris Angels. But the best of the Manchester underachievers were surely The New Fads; how did they not make it? Their last two albums showed they breathed the same air as The Smiths and The Stone Roses.
 
Top Bottom