I'm going to New York

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Uh, so...I guess I'll just pretend I'm not here. :straightface:

Mozza, if you legitimately want some suggestions for NYC stuff, let me know.
We've been waiting all day for your protips.

All of this other shit, though...I'm not interested.
I don't blame you. I'm sorry I just get so angry at her audacity.
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
Yeah I am seriously interested Chickpea, I'll PM you seeing as creating a thread causes certain douchbags to run their mouth.
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
You don't know SHIT. She is an artist working in her field, MAKING MONEY being a designer. Her other pictures indicate she is quite sophisticated in things culinary and interior design wise and that she's family oriented and tuned into hip, stylish things and people doing cool shit. But you decided at some point that she is low brow and refuse to stray from that idea because you are a closed-minded robot set in your ways and beliefs pawning yourself as open-minded and forward thinking. But she says "f***" and "shit" and suddenly you know the balance of her bank account and the extent of her worldliness? She probably has more class in her little finger than you could study and PRETEND to have in your emaciated body. She does not brag about her riches, she just is, something you can't fathom doing because you do not know the essence of demure, the hallmark of sophistication. Demure bitches can say f***, they don't have to "act", they just are.

You're thoroughly a judgmental piece of shit.

- - - Updated - - -



And this.
Haters gonna hate
 

Chickpea

pithy yet degenerate
Yeah I am seriously interested Chickpea, I'll PM you seeing as creating a thread causes certain douchbags to run their mouth.
Nah, it's OK. I'm happy to share things I like, I just don't get all of this other stuff or where it comes from. Like, at all.

Anyway, these are the things I think everyone should do in NYC. They're the only things I do. I don't really have any interest in stuff like Broadway shows or whatever…I know nothing about that side of this city. I rarely do anything that costs more than $0. Everything listed here is free except where indicated (and food, obviously).

- Take the F train to York Street in Brooklyn, spend some time exploring DUMBO and the waterfront/Brooklyn Bridge Park, then walk across the Brooklyn Bridge toward Manhattan and get dinner in Chinatown.
- Take the subway to Coney Island, and do the whole boardwalk. Yes, even in winter—the amusement park rides will be closed, but it's still worth it.
- Walk the full length of Central Park, making detours to see as much of the reservoir as possible. Hit the west side of the park between 71st & 74th to see Strawberry Fields and the Dakota across the street.
- Walk the High Line.
- Visit Walter de Maria's Earth Room and Broken Kilometer installations in SoHo.
- Go to MoMA ($25).
- Since you'll be here during Christmas, devote an hour or two to looking at shop windows on 5th Avenue. The sidewalks will be mobbed, but it's a must. Then walk over to Rockefeller Center to see the tree and the ice skaters.
- Go to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden ($10).
- Take the Staten Island Ferry round trip. No need to get off in Staten Island, just come back. (Sorry, Staten Island.)
- Go to Red Hook in Brooklyn. Getting there is a little tricky (you'll need to take a subway to a bus—nothing crazy), but it's a magical place that few tourists (or locals) bother with.
- Go the the Museum of Natural History ($0-22; pay as you wish).
- Visit Printed Matter and buy a beautiful, small-edition book.

Unfortunately I don't really know anything about hotels/accommodations since I've never needed to learn, but I'd rather eat glass than stay anywhere near midtown Manhattan/Times Square/touristy areas. If I were visiting NYC, I'd either want to be somewhere in lower Manhattan or in a part of Brooklyn that's near multiple subways. I can't help you out with bars, either, but I'm happy to share some favorite restaurants/food places if you're interested. Coffee shops, too.

I'll add to this list when I inevitably think of obvious stuff I've left out.
 
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Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
Nah, it's OK. I'm happy to share things I like, I just don't get all of this other stuff or where it comes from. Like, at all.

Anyway, these are the things I think everyone should do in NYC. They're the only things I do. I don't really have any interest in stuff like Broadway shows or whatever…I know nothing about that side of this city. I rarely do anything that costs more than $0. Everything listed here is free except where indicated (and food, obviously).

- Take the F train to York Street in Brooklyn, spend some time exploring DUMBO and the waterfront/Brooklyn Bridge Park, then walk across the Brooklyn Bridge toward Manhattan and get dinner in Chinatown.
- Take the subway to Coney Island, and do the whole boardwalk. Yes, even in winter—the amusement park rides will be closed, but it's still worth it.
- Walk the full length of Central Park, making detours to see as much of the reservoir as possible. Hit the west side of the park between 71st & 74th to see Strawberry Fields and the Dakota across the street.
- Walk the High Line.
- Visit Walter de Maria's Earth Room and Broken Kilometer installations in SoHo.
- Go to MoMA ($25).
- Since you'll be here during Christmas, devote an hour or two to looking at shop windows on 5th Avenue. The sidewalks will be mobbed, but it's a must. Then walk over to Rockefeller Center to see the tree and the ice skaters.
- Go to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden ($10).
- Take the Staten Island Ferry round trip. No need to get off in Staten Island, just come back. (Sorry, Staten Island.)
- Go to Red Hook in Brooklyn. Getting there is a little tricky (you'll need to take a subway to a bus—nothing crazy), but it's a magical place that few tourists (or locals) bother with.
- Go the the Museum of Natural History ($0-22; pay as you wish).

Unfortunately I don't really know anything about hotels/accommodations since I've never needed to learn, but I'd rather eat glass than stay anywhere near midtown Manhattan/Times Square/touristy areas. If I were visiting NYC, I'd either want to be somewhere in lower Manhattan or in a part of Brooklyn that's near multiple subways. I can't help you out with bars, either, but I'm happy to share some favorite restaurants/food places if you're interested. Coffee shops, too.

I'll add to this list when I inevitably think of obvious stuff I've left out.
No that's fab that chickpea, I've been looking tonight at various apartments that people are letting, some of them are really lovely too some in the East village and stuff, and at really reasonable prices too. I'll check out the links you've posted tomoz as well. Thanks :)
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
I am a caffeine addict. Up until five weeks ago (I've been "detoxing" since then—but that's another story), I drank a lot of coffee for years and years and years. I love everything about coffee, and I care a great deal about the quality of my cups, though I don't think I know enough about coffee to consider myself a connoisseur. I own two automatic drip machines, a cold brew system, several French presses, a Nespresso machine, a moka pot, and a Chemex/pour over vessel. All have their advantages and disadvantages. I'm assuming from your post that you're mostly interested in brewing drip coffee with an automatic machine, so I'll tell you about my two favorites…

At my house, I have a Technivorm Moccamaster KBG 741. It retails for about $300. It produces the most glorious coffee I have ever tasted in my life, and that's not an exaggeration.
The way the water is evenly dispersed across the grinds as it drips down results in a really rich, full-bodied taste with no bitterness. The brew cycle is fast (and fun to watch!), the machine itself is beautiful, and the coffee is nice and hot. I've had it for a little more than a year, and have no complaints. I recommend it wholeheartedly.

At my apartment, I have a much cheaper machine—a Cuisinart DCC-1200. You can pick one up for about $90-100. I've had it for close to 10 years without issues. It makes a great cup of coffee for the price, and honestly I didn't realize how much better home-brewed coffee could be until I bought the Technivorm. The Cuisinart is a nice machine, and if you want to go low-end, that would be my pick. (That said, I'm considering buying a second Technivorm for the apartment!)

If you have any specific questions about either machine, feel free to ask!
This thread reeks of pretentious wank
Yeah, you're right—a beverage regularly consumed by about a third of the entire global population IS pretty elite.

(And don't even get me started on people using KNIVES to chop food! Talk about snobbish...)
Oh come off it love, it's blatant that you and a few of you one here buy into this hipster style living with your skinny lattes and flat mochas whilst reading Ghost Milk on your iPad. It's the same as the craft beer scene, dicks with check shirts and beards. Nobody gave a f*** about it 15 years ago and people didn't give a shit until Starbucks became popular.

What annoys me is not people drinking coffee but the elitist crap that's now part of it, the Kopi Luwak, Barista style coffee, forking out hundreds of dollars just for a cup of fucking coffee. There's a cunt where I work who's a coffee snob, I even found an excel spreadsheet him and a few of his colleagues had put together on one of our works servers whereby they all did tasting notes and marks out of ten for each coffee the all picked instead of doing actual work. Pathetic.

And talking of knives I'll bet you've got one of those japanese Santoku knives.

The point of making my own basic coffee at home with a regular drip machine is that I don't drink either one of those things, and I don't want to pay for them, either. So, no.

I have no idea what that is.

I don't own an iPad.

I don't drink beer.

I don't wear patterns and I don't have a beard, but I am a dick. You got me there.

LOL WHUT. Nobody drank coffee pre-Starbucks? That's just…hilariously wrong.

I have no idea what that is, but again, the point of making regular drip coffee at home is that you DON'T spend hundreds of dollars on a cup of fucking coffee. You buy one good-quality, basic machine (or in my case, a very kind friend buys you one for your 38th birthday) and have it for decades. I don't like to re-buy things and I'm very thrifty, so quality of construction does matter to me. That comes with age.
I don't know what that is.

I think you might be confusing snobbery with average, everyday life.
Well then.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
Nothing better to do on a Friday night than to try to turn people against each other and/or stir up old shit, eh?
It is only 5 PM here. My point was that they seemed culturally mismatched. But then again, Chickpea has just confessed to never having been to a Broadway show--in almost forty years of living within two hours of Broadway. She has probably never been to the Metropolitan Opera House either. Perhaps they are more alike than Chickpea led us to believe. Maybe she isn't too highbrow after all. They both are very fond of the 'C' word.
 
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CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Wow. Yer done, Arby. Fucken pack it up.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Nah. I am staying. Somebody has to keep the groupthink sycophancy in check.
Oh is that what you do? Is that the service you offer to humanity? How about you get off your state-assisted ass and feed some homeless people or clean a park for some kids to play in or something not feeding your FBEgo. This is a forum to talk about a singer. Please wrap your mind around that. We are a bunch of people chatting about a rock singer. Think. About. That.

And admit it, the fact it's 5pm there is of no relevance. Because there is nobody but you in your world to enjoy a Friday night. Or a Saturday night. Or a Sunday night. Or...but Chickpea now is lying about her sophistication. Chickpea with the loft in New York doing fascinating design talking to another designer really grates on your nerves because nobody bought the photoshop of Tilda Swinton on the Odelisque's body you tried SELLING online. You're pathetic.
 
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Chickpea

pithy yet degenerate
Chickpea has just confessed never having been to a Broadway show
I did? (No, actually, I didn't.)

(Also, "confessed"? So people who can't afford to go to Broadway shows—which, by the way, is the majority of the population of NYC—are somehow "less than" in your eyes, requiring testified confessions of the lowliness incurred by not having seen The Lion King?)

What is with this painfully boring "highbrow"/"lowbrow" nonsense, anyway? Who seriously thinks about the world in those kinds of terms? I don't talk like that, I don't think like that, and I don't put those kinds of labels on people or on the culture of cities—especially ones as broad and varied as NYC.

Furthermore, I don't need Mozza to give a shit about advice I gave to Ghoul on buying a coffee maker in order to tell her I think the Brooklyn Bridge is nice and that walking is fun. It's really not that complicated.
 

mattisek

Member
Nah, it's OK. I'm happy to share things I like, I just don't get all of this other stuff or where it comes from. Like, at all.

Anyway, these are the things I think everyone should do in NYC. They're the only things I do. I don't really have any interest in stuff like Broadway shows or whatever…I know nothing about that side of this city. I rarely do anything that costs more than $0. Everything listed here is free except where indicated (and food, obviously).

- Take the F train to York Street in Brooklyn, spend some time exploring DUMBO and the waterfront/Brooklyn Bridge Park, then walk across the Brooklyn Bridge toward Manhattan and get dinner in Chinatown.
- Take the subway to Coney Island, and do the whole boardwalk. Yes, even in winter—the amusement park rides will be closed, but it's still worth it.
- Walk the full length of Central Park, making detours to see as much of the reservoir as possible. Hit the west side of the park between 71st & 74th to see Strawberry Fields and the Dakota across the street.
- Walk the High Line.
- Visit Walter de Maria's Earth Room and Broken Kilometer installations in SoHo.
- Go to MoMA ($25).
- Since you'll be here during Christmas, devote an hour or two to looking at shop windows on 5th Avenue. The sidewalks will be mobbed, but it's a must. Then walk over to Rockefeller Center to see the tree and the ice skaters.
- Go to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden ($10).
- Take the Staten Island Ferry round trip. No need to get off in Staten Island, just come back. (Sorry, Staten Island.)
- Go to Red Hook in Brooklyn. Getting there is a little tricky (you'll need to take a subway to a bus—nothing crazy), but it's a magical place that few tourists (or locals) bother with.
- Go the the Museum of Natural History ($0-22; pay as you wish).
- Visit Printed Matter and buy a beautiful, small-edition book.

Unfortunately I don't really know anything about hotels/accommodations since I've never needed to learn, but I'd rather eat glass than stay anywhere near midtown Manhattan/Times Square/touristy areas. If I were visiting NYC, I'd either want to be somewhere in lower Manhattan or in a part of Brooklyn that's near multiple subways. I can't help you out with bars, either, but I'm happy to share some favorite restaurants/food places if you're interested. Coffee shops, too.

I'll add to this list when I inevitably think of obvious stuff I've left out.
From distant memory I'd also recommend:

F-Train, Coney Island (though it's a bit trashy too), MOMA (and lots of other museums), Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

Central Park is an obvious choice, but don't forget Brooklyn's Prospect Park (far less tourists).

You should seriously consider staying downtown or outside Manhattan. Usually a bit cheaper and more interesting from my memory. I know the place has changed a lot, but I stayed at East Village a couple of months. Which was a nice neighboorhood back then. Please check if the Boxcar Lounge is still open (between AVE B AND C around 11/10th street close to Thompkins Square Park) and if GIGI's still excisting. You certainly need to go to vist parts of Brooklyn and other parts of the city. Williamsburg was pretty popular back then...

Oh I need to come back too ....sometime.
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
It is only 5 PM here. My point was that they seemed culturally mismatched. But then again, Chickpea has just confessed never having been to a Broadway show--in almost forty years of living within two hours of Broadway. She has probably never been to the Metropolitan Opera House either. Perhaps they are more alike that Chickpea led us to believe. Maybe CP isn't too highbrow after all. They both are very fond of the 'C' word.
Listen to every single word RB.

 
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Viva Mozza

You're the one for me
From what I remember:

The Staten Island ferry is a good choice to see the Statue for almost no money.
MOMA is a must.
But don't forget about the Guggenheim Museum, great art and great architecture.
The Empire State by night.
Soho and Chinatown.
Cannot recommend the WTC platform anymore, sorry.
Rockefeller Center and Central Park are also a must.
And check out for concerts in the clubs and cellars all over Mahattan.

And most important of all: enjoy your trip!!!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
yeah im thinking im never gonna mention money here again. have fun on your trip mozza especially if its your first. expect ice
 

cornelius blaze

Boychild mustn't tremble!
Me and the other half are looking to book a trip to NY soon for next xmas, does anyone live there who could recommend any good hotels/apartments places of interest that are off the beaten track that aren't too expensive in the cool parts of town? Don't know what borough to stay in either, we were looking at Manhattan or Brooklyn?

I need advice?

Thanks
Hello there,

I don't live in NYC but i would go here again:

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/bars/dark-room
 

sweetness522

My one true love
I'm going to proudly promote my favorite borough and hometown, Queens. After all, it just came in as the #1 tourist destination in the United States according to Lonely Planet:

http://time.com/3630491/queens-travel-lonely-planet/

It's probably where you will land upon arrival (if you are flying into JFK). Most people just land and then leave.

Why not visit Rockaway Beach and the famous home of the Ramones? And of course, Newtown High School in Queens is where The NY Dolls met (with the except of David Johansen who is from Staten Island). We also have the famous site of both World Fairs in 1939 and 1964 - Flushing Meadows Cornona Park where you can also see the Tennis Center which is the home of the US Open.

And staying in Long Island City, Queens is only one stop from Manhattan, has lots of hotels that have a great view of the Manhattan skyline at much more affordable rates than Manhattan. If I was a tourist, I would stay in Long Island City. When I was growing up, it was an industrial wasteland. Home of the Silvercup bread factory (we used to smell bread baking when crossing the Queensboro Bridge). Long Island City is becoming the new place to be with high rise condos and lots of young families. And you can explore Gantry Park with the most INCREDIBLE views of the East River and Manhattan. And don't miss the giant Pepsi Cola sign that is lit up at night.

For food, Flushing is the best Chinatown outside of Manhattan with athentic noodle houses and yummy offerings. Astoria & Jackson Heights have an array of ethnic restaurants.

But if one MUST venture into Manhattan ;) the Flatiron Building must not be missed. The small park across the street is incredibly charming, too. It's called Madison Square Park and has the cutest dog run (I could stand there all day and watch the dogs playing with each other).

The Plaza Hotel is beautiful inside and out. We are hopefully on our way to banning the nearby horse-drawn carriages with the incumbent mayor. Kudos to that. And yes, Moz used to stay at the Plaza in the 90's. It's now part hotel/part condos I believe.

There are so many places that I'm still exploring myself. A lifetime here hasn't been enough for me.

Enjoy your trip and feel free to scream for help. Anytime.
 
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