I'll be gone for a bit. I'd like everyone's opinion on this fascnating article.

  • Thread starter Theo van Gogh Martyrs Brigade
  • Start date
T

Theo van Gogh Martyrs Brigade

Guest
I hope this generates lots of discussion for later on tonight!

http://www.elsewhere.org/cgi-bin/postmodern/1523682329

Modernism in the works of Cage
Q. Wilhelm Buxton
Department of Ontology, Cambridge University
Thomas Dahmus
Department of English, University of Georgia

1. Narratives of collapse
In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between masculine and feminine. Marx promotes the use of Foucaultist power relations to read and modify class. However, the subject is interpolated into a cultural discourse that includes sexuality as a paradox.

The characteristic theme of Pickett's[1] essay on modernism is the stasis, and some would say the meaninglessness, of structuralist consciousness. The main theme of the works of Spelling is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that in Robin's Hoods, Spelling denies Foucaultist power relations; in Charmed, however, he affirms precultural semanticist theory.

The characteristic theme of Humphrey's[2] analysis of cultural discourse is the common ground between sexual identity and truth. But if Foucaultist power relations holds, we have to choose between cultural discourse and subdialectic nihilism.

The example of Foucaultist power relations which is a central theme of Spelling's The Heights emerges again in Models, Inc., although in a more mythopoetical sense. It could be said that Lacan suggests the use of modernism to attack sexism. Dietrich[3] implies that the works of Spelling are empowering. But if structural narrative holds, we have to choose between Foucaultist power relations and predialectic theory.

In The Heights, Spelling examines cultural discourse; in Charmed, although, he deconstructs capitalist narrative. In a sense, the subject is contextualised into a modernism that includes sexuality as a totality.

2. Postcultural feminism and semiotic sublimation
If one examines modernism, one is faced with a choice: either accept Foucaultist power relations or conclude that culture may be used to entrench class divisions. Marx uses the term 'modernism' to denote not narrative, but subnarrative. But Prinn[4] states that we have to choose between semiotic sublimation and the postcultural paradigm of expression.

The subject is interpolated into a deconstructive neosemioticist theory that includes truth as a paradox. It could be said that the primary theme of the works of Burroughs is a self-sufficient totality.

Several discourses concerning not narrative, but postnarrative exist. However, Lacan's essay on Foucaultist power relations implies that sexuality is capable of truth, given that the premise of modernism is valid.

3. Burroughs and semiotic sublimation
"Sexual identity is intrinsically used in the service of hierarchy," says Sartre. Baudrillard promotes the use of modernism to read society. Thus, Derrida uses the term 'the cultural paradigm of discourse' to denote the difference between class and sexual identity.

The main theme of Pickett's[5] model of modernism is a mythopoetical paradox. The failure of Foucaultist power relations depicted in Burroughs's Naked Lunch is also evident in The Ticket that Exploded. However, modernism holds that context is created by communication.

"Truth is impossible," says Sartre. Lacan suggests the use of semiotic sublimation to deconstruct archaic, elitist perceptions of class. In a sense, if Foucaultist power relations holds, the works of Burroughs are reminiscent of Eco.

In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of constructivist sexuality. Sartre promotes the use of modernism to analyse and attack sexual identity. However, the primary theme of the works of Burroughs is the bridge between class and sexual identity.

The subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes reality as a whole. But the creation/destruction distinction prevalent in Burroughs's Port of Saints emerges again in The Ticket that Exploded, although in a more self-justifying sense.

D'Erlette[6] states that we have to choose between modernism and patriarchial neocapitalist theory. However, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes consciousness as a paradox. Sontag uses the term 'semiotic sublimation' to denote the role of the poet as artist. Thus, a number of theories concerning Foucaultist power relations may be discovered.

Baudrillard's essay on semiotic sublimation suggests that culture, somewhat paradoxically, has significance, but only if narrativity is equal to culture; if that is not the case, the raison d'etre of the writer is deconstruction. But if Foucaultist power relations holds, we have to choose between dialectic construction and subcapitalist deconstructive theory.

Many desublimations concerning not discourse as such, but postdiscourse exist. It could be said that in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, Burroughs affirms semiotic sublimation; in Naked Lunch he denies modernism.

The main theme of Dahmus's[7] critique of semiotic sublimation is the difference between class and narrativity. Therefore, Foucault uses the term 'modernism' to denote a neopatriarchialist reality.

4. Textual narrative and subdialectic textual theory
"Class is fundamentally responsible for hierarchy," says Lacan; however, according to Brophy[8] , it is not so much class that is fundamentally responsible for hierarchy, but rather the economy, and subsequent failure, of class. The premise of Foucaultist power relations implies that the establishment is part of the rubicon of language, given that subdialectic textual theory is invalid. However, the subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes culture as a whole.

The characteristic theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the artist as poet. Foucault uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the bridge between narrativity and society. In a sense, the primary theme of la Fournier's[9] model of Foucaultist power relations is not, in fact, theory, but subtheory.

Dietrich[10] holds that we have to choose between capitalist feminism and subsemioticist appropriation. Thus, the premise of modernism implies that the purpose of the reader is social comment.

Lacan uses the term 'capitalist desituationism' to denote the failure, and thus the paradigm, of pretextual consciousness. In a sense, several narratives concerning modernism may be revealed. Baudrillard uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the common ground between sexual identity and society. But material rationalism states that language has objective value.

Sontag uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the fatal flaw, and some would say the defining characteristic, of posttextual sexual identity. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes sexuality as a reality.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Pickett, R. (1976) Reading Foucault: Subconstructive deconstruction, objectivism and modernism. Panic Button Books
2. Humphrey, D. M. A. ed. (1980) Modernism in the works of Stone. O'Reilly & Associates

3. Dietrich, T. A. (1999) Reassessing Expressionism: Objectivism, Baudrillardist simulation and modernism. Yale University Press

4. Prinn, G. T. Q. ed. (1978) Modernism in the works of Burroughs. Oxford University Press

5. Pickett, L. M. (1982) Subdialectic Theories: Modernism in the works of Lynch. O'Reilly & Associates

6. d'Erlette, Q. ed. (1973) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations. Yale University Press

7. Dahmus, Z. N. (1981) The Dialectic of Reality: Modernism in the works of Joyce. And/Or Press

8. Brophy, J. F. O. ed. (1974) Foucaultist power relations and modernism. University of Michigan Press

9. la Fournier, T. (1987) Reinventing Surrealism: Foucaultist power relations in the works of Gaiman. Oxford University Press

10. Dietrich, H. K. ed. (1993) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations. Cambridge University Press
 
C

claire voyants

Guest
only to return as "laficado" some "oaf"anagram no doubt , i see you!

> I hope this generates lots of discussion for later on tonight!

> http://www.elsewhere.org/cgi-bin/postmodern/1523682329 Modernism in the
> works of Cage
> Q. Wilhelm Buxton
> Department of Ontology, Cambridge University
> Thomas Dahmus
> Department of English, University of Georgia

> 1. Narratives of collapse
> In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between
> masculine and feminine. Marx promotes the use of Foucaultist power
> relations to read and modify class. However, the subject is interpolated
> into a cultural discourse that includes sexuality as a paradox.

> The characteristic theme of Pickett's[1] essay on modernism is the stasis,
> and some would say the meaninglessness, of structuralist consciousness.
> The main theme of the works of Spelling is a self-falsifying whole. It
> could be said that in Robin's Hoods, Spelling denies Foucaultist power
> relations; in Charmed, however, he affirms precultural semanticist theory.

> The characteristic theme of Humphrey's[2] analysis of cultural discourse
> is the common ground between sexual identity and truth. But if Foucaultist
> power relations holds, we have to choose between cultural discourse and
> subdialectic nihilism.

> The example of Foucaultist power relations which is a central theme of
> Spelling's The Heights emerges again in Models, Inc., although in a more
> mythopoetical sense. It could be said that Lacan suggests the use of
> modernism to attack sexism. Dietrich[3] implies that the works of Spelling
> are empowering. But if structural narrative holds, we have to choose
> between Foucaultist power relations and predialectic theory.

> In The Heights, Spelling examines cultural discourse; in Charmed,
> although, he deconstructs capitalist narrative. In a sense, the subject is
> contextualised into a modernism that includes sexuality as a totality.

> 2. Postcultural feminism and semiotic sublimation
> If one examines modernism, one is faced with a choice: either accept
> Foucaultist power relations or conclude that culture may be used to
> entrench class divisions. Marx uses the term 'modernism' to denote not
> narrative, but subnarrative. But Prinn[4] states that we have to choose
> between semiotic sublimation and the postcultural paradigm of expression.

> The subject is interpolated into a deconstructive neosemioticist theory
> that includes truth as a paradox. It could be said that the primary theme
> of the works of Burroughs is a self-sufficient totality.

> Several discourses concerning not narrative, but postnarrative exist.
> However, Lacan's essay on Foucaultist power relations implies that
> sexuality is capable of truth, given that the premise of modernism is
> valid.

> 3. Burroughs and semiotic sublimation
> "Sexual identity is intrinsically used in the service of
> hierarchy," says Sartre. Baudrillard promotes the use of modernism to
> read society. Thus, Derrida uses the term 'the cultural paradigm of
> discourse' to denote the difference between class and sexual identity.

> The main theme of Pickett's[5] model of modernism is a mythopoetical
> paradox. The failure of Foucaultist power relations depicted in
> Burroughs's Naked Lunch is also evident in The Ticket that Exploded.
> However, modernism holds that context is created by communication.

> "Truth is impossible," says Sartre. Lacan suggests the use of
> semiotic sublimation to deconstruct archaic, elitist perceptions of class.
> In a sense, if Foucaultist power relations holds, the works of Burroughs
> are reminiscent of Eco.

> In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of
> constructivist sexuality. Sartre promotes the use of modernism to analyse
> and attack sexual identity. However, the primary theme of the works of
> Burroughs is the bridge between class and sexual identity.

> The subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that
> includes reality as a whole. But the creation/destruction distinction
> prevalent in Burroughs's Port of Saints emerges again in The Ticket that
> Exploded, although in a more self-justifying sense.

> D'Erlette[6] states that we have to choose between modernism and
> patriarchial neocapitalist theory. However, the subject is interpolated
> into a Foucaultist power relations that includes consciousness as a
> paradox. Sontag uses the term 'semiotic sublimation' to denote the role of
> the poet as artist. Thus, a number of theories concerning Foucaultist
> power relations may be discovered.

> Baudrillard's essay on semiotic sublimation suggests that culture,
> somewhat paradoxically, has significance, but only if narrativity is equal
> to culture; if that is not the case, the raison d'etre of the writer is
> deconstruction. But if Foucaultist power relations holds, we have to
> choose between dialectic construction and subcapitalist deconstructive
> theory.

> Many desublimations concerning not discourse as such, but postdiscourse
> exist. It could be said that in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, Burroughs
> affirms semiotic sublimation; in Naked Lunch he denies modernism.

> The main theme of Dahmus's[7] critique of semiotic sublimation is the
> difference between class and narrativity. Therefore, Foucault uses the
> term 'modernism' to denote a neopatriarchialist reality.

> 4. Textual narrative and subdialectic textual theory
> "Class is fundamentally responsible for hierarchy," says Lacan;
> however, according to Brophy[8] , it is not so much class that is
> fundamentally responsible for hierarchy, but rather the economy, and
> subsequent failure, of class. The premise of Foucaultist power relations
> implies that the establishment is part of the rubicon of language, given
> that subdialectic textual theory is invalid. However, the subject is
> contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes culture as
> a whole.

> The characteristic theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the artist
> as poet. Foucault uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote
> the bridge between narrativity and society. In a sense, the primary theme
> of la Fournier's[9] model of Foucaultist power relations is not, in fact,
> theory, but subtheory.

> Dietrich[10] holds that we have to choose between capitalist feminism and
> subsemioticist appropriation. Thus, the premise of modernism implies that
> the purpose of the reader is social comment.

> Lacan uses the term 'capitalist desituationism' to denote the failure, and
> thus the paradigm, of pretextual consciousness. In a sense, several
> narratives concerning modernism may be revealed. Baudrillard uses the term
> 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the common ground between sexual
> identity and society. But material rationalism states that language has
> objective value.

> Sontag uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the fatal
> flaw, and some would say the defining characteristic, of posttextual
> sexual identity. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a
> Foucaultist power relations that includes sexuality as a reality.

>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 1. Pickett, R. (1976) Reading Foucault: Subconstructive deconstruction,
> objectivism and modernism. Panic Button Books
> 2. Humphrey, D. M. A. ed. (1980) Modernism in the works of Stone. O'Reilly
> & Associates

> 3. Dietrich, T. A. (1999) Reassessing Expressionism: Objectivism,
> Baudrillardist simulation and modernism. Yale University Press

> 4. Prinn, G. T. Q. ed. (1978) Modernism in the works of Burroughs. Oxford
> University Press

> 5. Pickett, L. M. (1982) Subdialectic Theories: Modernism in the works of
> Lynch. O'Reilly & Associates

> 6. d'Erlette, Q. ed. (1973) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations.
> Yale University Press

> 7. Dahmus, Z. N. (1981) The Dialectic of Reality: Modernism in the works
> of Joyce. And/Or Press

> 8. Brophy, J. F. O. ed. (1974) Foucaultist power relations and modernism.
> University of Michigan Press

> 9. la Fournier, T. (1987) Reinventing Surrealism: Foucaultist power
> relations in the works of Gaiman. Oxford University Press

> 10. Dietrich, H. K. ed. (1993) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations.
> Cambridge University Press
 
B

Bertie

Guest
Brilliant! Pure Genius! You are amazing!

Your grasp of postmodern theory and its applications is nothing less than pure genius. Not only did I understand everything you wrote, but will be saving this for future reference.

Hahaha.
 
C

claire voyants

Guest
NO f***ing moderator can dispute that these two are loathsome bores of the highest calibration DIE!

> Your grasp of postmodern theory and its applications is nothing less than
> pure genius. Not only did I understand everything you wrote, but will be
> saving this for future reference.

> Hahaha.

and you will....i see it in dem stars
 
B

Bertie

Guest
The board is full of crashing bores... you are not one, you are not one.
 
C

claire voyants

Guest
hey jehne? heard of men? or have i sniffed out a prawn smuggler?
 
L

lg

Guest
I stopped reading by the third line.

> I hope this generates lots of discussion for later on tonight!

> http://www.elsewhere.org/cgi-bin/postmodern/1523682329 Modernism in the
> works of Cage
> Q. Wilhelm Buxton
> Department of Ontology, Cambridge University
> Thomas Dahmus
> Department of English, University of Georgia

> 1. Narratives of collapse
> In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between
> masculine and feminine. Marx promotes the use of Foucaultist power
> relations to read and modify class. However, the subject is interpolated
> into a cultural discourse that includes sexuality as a paradox.

> The characteristic theme of Pickett's[1] essay on modernism is the stasis,
> and some would say the meaninglessness, of structuralist consciousness.
> The main theme of the works of Spelling is a self-falsifying whole. It
> could be said that in Robin's Hoods, Spelling denies Foucaultist power
> relations; in Charmed, however, he affirms precultural semanticist theory.

> The characteristic theme of Humphrey's[2] analysis of cultural discourse
> is the common ground between sexual identity and truth. But if Foucaultist
> power relations holds, we have to choose between cultural discourse and
> subdialectic nihilism.

> The example of Foucaultist power relations which is a central theme of
> Spelling's The Heights emerges again in Models, Inc., although in a more
> mythopoetical sense. It could be said that Lacan suggests the use of
> modernism to attack sexism. Dietrich[3] implies that the works of Spelling
> are empowering. But if structural narrative holds, we have to choose
> between Foucaultist power relations and predialectic theory.

> In The Heights, Spelling examines cultural discourse; in Charmed,
> although, he deconstructs capitalist narrative. In a sense, the subject is
> contextualised into a modernism that includes sexuality as a totality.

> 2. Postcultural feminism and semiotic sublimation
> If one examines modernism, one is faced with a choice: either accept
> Foucaultist power relations or conclude that culture may be used to
> entrench class divisions. Marx uses the term 'modernism' to denote not
> narrative, but subnarrative. But Prinn[4] states that we have to choose
> between semiotic sublimation and the postcultural paradigm of expression.

> The subject is interpolated into a deconstructive neosemioticist theory
> that includes truth as a paradox. It could be said that the primary theme
> of the works of Burroughs is a self-sufficient totality.

> Several discourses concerning not narrative, but postnarrative exist.
> However, Lacan's essay on Foucaultist power relations implies that
> sexuality is capable of truth, given that the premise of modernism is
> valid.

> 3. Burroughs and semiotic sublimation
> "Sexual identity is intrinsically used in the service of
> hierarchy," says Sartre. Baudrillard promotes the use of modernism to
> read society. Thus, Derrida uses the term 'the cultural paradigm of
> discourse' to denote the difference between class and sexual identity.

> The main theme of Pickett's[5] model of modernism is a mythopoetical
> paradox. The failure of Foucaultist power relations depicted in
> Burroughs's Naked Lunch is also evident in The Ticket that Exploded.
> However, modernism holds that context is created by communication.

> "Truth is impossible," says Sartre. Lacan suggests the use of
> semiotic sublimation to deconstruct archaic, elitist perceptions of class.
> In a sense, if Foucaultist power relations holds, the works of Burroughs
> are reminiscent of Eco.

> In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of
> constructivist sexuality. Sartre promotes the use of modernism to analyse
> and attack sexual identity. However, the primary theme of the works of
> Burroughs is the bridge between class and sexual identity.

> The subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that
> includes reality as a whole. But the creation/destruction distinction
> prevalent in Burroughs's Port of Saints emerges again in The Ticket that
> Exploded, although in a more self-justifying sense.

> D'Erlette[6] states that we have to choose between modernism and
> patriarchial neocapitalist theory. However, the subject is interpolated
> into a Foucaultist power relations that includes consciousness as a
> paradox. Sontag uses the term 'semiotic sublimation' to denote the role of
> the poet as artist. Thus, a number of theories concerning Foucaultist
> power relations may be discovered.

> Baudrillard's essay on semiotic sublimation suggests that culture,
> somewhat paradoxically, has significance, but only if narrativity is equal
> to culture; if that is not the case, the raison d'etre of the writer is
> deconstruction. But if Foucaultist power relations holds, we have to
> choose between dialectic construction and subcapitalist deconstructive
> theory.

> Many desublimations concerning not discourse as such, but postdiscourse
> exist. It could be said that in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, Burroughs
> affirms semiotic sublimation; in Naked Lunch he denies modernism.

> The main theme of Dahmus's[7] critique of semiotic sublimation is the
> difference between class and narrativity. Therefore, Foucault uses the
> term 'modernism' to denote a neopatriarchialist reality.

> 4. Textual narrative and subdialectic textual theory
> "Class is fundamentally responsible for hierarchy," says Lacan;
> however, according to Brophy[8] , it is not so much class that is
> fundamentally responsible for hierarchy, but rather the economy, and
> subsequent failure, of class. The premise of Foucaultist power relations
> implies that the establishment is part of the rubicon of language, given
> that subdialectic textual theory is invalid. However, the subject is
> contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes culture as
> a whole.

> The characteristic theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the artist
> as poet. Foucault uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote
> the bridge between narrativity and society. In a sense, the primary theme
> of la Fournier's[9] model of Foucaultist power relations is not, in fact,
> theory, but subtheory.

> Dietrich[10] holds that we have to choose between capitalist feminism and
> subsemioticist appropriation. Thus, the premise of modernism implies that
> the purpose of the reader is social comment.

> Lacan uses the term 'capitalist desituationism' to denote the failure, and
> thus the paradigm, of pretextual consciousness. In a sense, several
> narratives concerning modernism may be revealed. Baudrillard uses the term
> 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the common ground between sexual
> identity and society. But material rationalism states that language has
> objective value.

> Sontag uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the fatal
> flaw, and some would say the defining characteristic, of posttextual
> sexual identity. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a
> Foucaultist power relations that includes sexuality as a reality.

>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 1. Pickett, R. (1976) Reading Foucault: Subconstructive deconstruction,
> objectivism and modernism. Panic Button Books
> 2. Humphrey, D. M. A. ed. (1980) Modernism in the works of Stone. O'Reilly
> & Associates

> 3. Dietrich, T. A. (1999) Reassessing Expressionism: Objectivism,
> Baudrillardist simulation and modernism. Yale University Press

> 4. Prinn, G. T. Q. ed. (1978) Modernism in the works of Burroughs. Oxford
> University Press

> 5. Pickett, L. M. (1982) Subdialectic Theories: Modernism in the works of
> Lynch. O'Reilly & Associates

> 6. d'Erlette, Q. ed. (1973) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations.
> Yale University Press

> 7. Dahmus, Z. N. (1981) The Dialectic of Reality: Modernism in the works
> of Joyce. And/Or Press

> 8. Brophy, J. F. O. ed. (1974) Foucaultist power relations and modernism.
> University of Michigan Press

> 9. la Fournier, T. (1987) Reinventing Surrealism: Foucaultist power
> relations in the works of Gaiman. Oxford University Press

> 10. Dietrich, H. K. ed. (1993) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations.
> Cambridge University Press
 
B

Bertie

Guest
It is a joke guys. Check out the link ~ POSTMODERN GENERATOR ~

Nobody can understand it. It is hogwash. Although it is syntactically correct, it makes absolutely no sense.

http://www.simonyi.ox.ac.uk/dawkins/WorldOfDawkins-archive/Dawkins/Work/Reviews/1998-07-09postmodernism_disrobed.shtml
 
D

dirty mugu

Guest
how the f***S you know what THEO post? you claire voyants too?

> Nobody can understand it. It is hogwash. Although it is syntactically
> correct, it makes absolutely no sense.

>
> http://www.simonyi.ox.ac.uk/dawkins/WorldOfDawkins-archive/Dawkins/Work/Reviews/1998-07-09postmodernism_disrobed.shtml
 
L

lg

Guest
Re: It is a joke guys. Check out the link ~ POSTMODERN GENERATOR ~

No wonder most of us stopped reading it at the first paragraph.

Talk about too much time on one's hands.

> Nobody can understand it. It is hogwash. Although it is syntactically
> correct, it makes absolutely no sense.

>
> http://www.simonyi.ox.ac.uk/dawkins/WorldOfDawkins-archive/Dawkins/Work/Reviews/1998-07-09postmodernism_disrobed.shtml
 
B

Bertie

Guest
It probably took Theo two minutes to copy, paste, and post that. That is not TOO MUCH time.
 
L

lg

Guest
Re: It probably took Theo two minutes to copy, paste, and post that. That is not TOO MUCH time.

Too much time on the hands of the ones who came up with this generator, girl...
 
D

dirty mugu

Guest
i am loving this bitch she no need to send money she gooood
 
B

Bertie

Guest
Re: It probably took Theo two minutes to copy, paste, and post that. That is not TOO MUCH time.

> Too much time on the hands of the ones who came up with this generator,
> girl...

Oh OK. Yeah, I agree with that.
 
B

Bertie

Guest
Instinct?!

Well, I don't have a PhD in sociology nor philosophy. But I have read enough conflict and structuralist theories -- including Foucalt and Marx, to know it was BS. Too bad those intellectuals at the Uni's are so easily fooled -- believing is seeing, I suppose.
 
C

Codreanu

Guest
> I hope this generates lots of discussion for later on tonight!

> http://www.elsewhere.org/cgi-bin/postmodern/1523682329 Modernism in the
> works of Cage
> Q. Wilhelm Buxton
> Department of Ontology, Cambridge University
> Thomas Dahmus
> Department of English, University of Georgia

> 1. Narratives of collapse
> In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between
> masculine and feminine. Marx promotes the use of Foucaultist power
> relations to read and modify class. However, the subject is interpolated
> into a cultural discourse that includes sexuality as a paradox.

> The characteristic theme of Pickett's[1] essay on modernism is the stasis,
> and some would say the meaninglessness, of structuralist consciousness.
> The main theme of the works of Spelling is a self-falsifying whole. It
> could be said that in Robin's Hoods, Spelling denies Foucaultist power
> relations; in Charmed, however, he affirms precultural semanticist theory.

> The characteristic theme of Humphrey's[2] analysis of cultural discourse
> is the common ground between sexual identity and truth. But if Foucaultist
> power relations holds, we have to choose between cultural discourse and
> subdialectic nihilism.

> The example of Foucaultist power relations which is a central theme of
> Spelling's The Heights emerges again in Models, Inc., although in a more
> mythopoetical sense. It could be said that Lacan suggests the use of
> modernism to attack sexism. Dietrich[3] implies that the works of Spelling
> are empowering. But if structural narrative holds, we have to choose
> between Foucaultist power relations and predialectic theory.

> In The Heights, Spelling examines cultural discourse; in Charmed,
> although, he deconstructs capitalist narrative. In a sense, the subject is
> contextualised into a modernism that includes sexuality as a totality.

> 2. Postcultural feminism and semiotic sublimation
> If one examines modernism, one is faced with a choice: either accept
> Foucaultist power relations or conclude that culture may be used to
> entrench class divisions. Marx uses the term 'modernism' to denote not
> narrative, but subnarrative. But Prinn[4] states that we have to choose
> between semiotic sublimation and the postcultural paradigm of expression.

> The subject is interpolated into a deconstructive neosemioticist theory
> that includes truth as a paradox. It could be said that the primary theme
> of the works of Burroughs is a self-sufficient totality.

> Several discourses concerning not narrative, but postnarrative exist.
> However, Lacan's essay on Foucaultist power relations implies that
> sexuality is capable of truth, given that the premise of modernism is
> valid.

> 3. Burroughs and semiotic sublimation
> "Sexual identity is intrinsically used in the service of
> hierarchy," says Sartre. Baudrillard promotes the use of modernism to
> read society. Thus, Derrida uses the term 'the cultural paradigm of
> discourse' to denote the difference between class and sexual identity.

> The main theme of Pickett's[5] model of modernism is a mythopoetical
> paradox. The failure of Foucaultist power relations depicted in
> Burroughs's Naked Lunch is also evident in The Ticket that Exploded.
> However, modernism holds that context is created by communication.

> "Truth is impossible," says Sartre. Lacan suggests the use of
> semiotic sublimation to deconstruct archaic, elitist perceptions of class.
> In a sense, if Foucaultist power relations holds, the works of Burroughs
> are reminiscent of Eco.

> In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of
> constructivist sexuality. Sartre promotes the use of modernism to analyse
> and attack sexual identity. However, the primary theme of the works of
> Burroughs is the bridge between class and sexual identity.

> The subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that
> includes reality as a whole. But the creation/destruction distinction
> prevalent in Burroughs's Port of Saints emerges again in The Ticket that
> Exploded, although in a more self-justifying sense.

> D'Erlette[6] states that we have to choose between modernism and
> patriarchial neocapitalist theory. However, the subject is interpolated
> into a Foucaultist power relations that includes consciousness as a
> paradox. Sontag uses the term 'semiotic sublimation' to denote the role of
> the poet as artist. Thus, a number of theories concerning Foucaultist
> power relations may be discovered.

> Baudrillard's essay on semiotic sublimation suggests that culture,
> somewhat paradoxically, has significance, but only if narrativity is equal
> to culture; if that is not the case, the raison d'etre of the writer is
> deconstruction. But if Foucaultist power relations holds, we have to
> choose between dialectic construction and subcapitalist deconstructive
> theory.

> Many desublimations concerning not discourse as such, but postdiscourse
> exist. It could be said that in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, Burroughs
> affirms semiotic sublimation; in Naked Lunch he denies modernism.

> The main theme of Dahmus's[7] critique of semiotic sublimation is the
> difference between class and narrativity. Therefore, Foucault uses the
> term 'modernism' to denote a neopatriarchialist reality.

> 4. Textual narrative and subdialectic textual theory
> "Class is fundamentally responsible for hierarchy," says Lacan;
> however, according to Brophy[8] , it is not so much class that is
> fundamentally responsible for hierarchy, but rather the economy, and
> subsequent failure, of class. The premise of Foucaultist power relations
> implies that the establishment is part of the rubicon of language, given
> that subdialectic textual theory is invalid. However, the subject is
> contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes culture as
> a whole.

> The characteristic theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the artist
> as poet. Foucault uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote
> the bridge between narrativity and society. In a sense, the primary theme
> of la Fournier's[9] model of Foucaultist power relations is not, in fact,
> theory, but subtheory.

> Dietrich[10] holds that we have to choose between capitalist feminism and
> subsemioticist appropriation. Thus, the premise of modernism implies that
> the purpose of the reader is social comment.

> Lacan uses the term 'capitalist desituationism' to denote the failure, and
> thus the paradigm, of pretextual consciousness. In a sense, several
> narratives concerning modernism may be revealed. Baudrillard uses the term
> 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the common ground between sexual
> identity and society. But material rationalism states that language has
> objective value.

> Sontag uses the term 'subdialectic textual theory' to denote the fatal
> flaw, and some would say the defining characteristic, of posttextual
> sexual identity. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a
> Foucaultist power relations that includes sexuality as a reality.

>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 1. Pickett, R. (1976) Reading Foucault: Subconstructive deconstruction,
> objectivism and modernism. Panic Button Books
> 2. Humphrey, D. M. A. ed. (1980) Modernism in the works of Stone. O'Reilly
> & Associates

> 3. Dietrich, T. A. (1999) Reassessing Expressionism: Objectivism,
> Baudrillardist simulation and modernism. Yale University Press

> 4. Prinn, G. T. Q. ed. (1978) Modernism in the works of Burroughs. Oxford
> University Press

> 5. Pickett, L. M. (1982) Subdialectic Theories: Modernism in the works of
> Lynch. O'Reilly & Associates

> 6. d'Erlette, Q. ed. (1973) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations.
> Yale University Press

> 7. Dahmus, Z. N. (1981) The Dialectic of Reality: Modernism in the works
> of Joyce. And/Or Press

> 8. Brophy, J. F. O. ed. (1974) Foucaultist power relations and modernism.
> University of Michigan Press

> 9. la Fournier, T. (1987) Reinventing Surrealism: Foucaultist power
> relations in the works of Gaiman. Oxford University Press

> 10. Dietrich, H. K. ed. (1993) Modernism and Foucaultist power relations.
> Cambridge University Press

Sadly, I have read enough of this sort of flapdoodle to NOT REQUIRE a "Postmodern Generator" to free-associate in post-structual idiom...

Codreanu reponds:

I am grateful to the author for reminding us that stucturalist situation of the subject beyond the de-totalized integers of class and sex --interpolating the famous Lacanian injunction, we might state that "there is no [classed] relation"-- is subject(!) to semiotic (and, consequentially, the "subject's" privileged incarnation in its mirror phrase) leakage of signification. However, the author fails to expound on Sontag's giddy hint of the possibilization of the ever-possible-possibility of "semiotic sublimation" -- a primordial suspension of permanent referentiality in The-Name-Of-The-Father who speaks only of (him)self: a demiurge who moveth over the chthonic waters of narrativity, whose patriarchal speech commits the foundational (though groundless and unfounded) meta-ontologic actus. While such might be regarded as a mere mythopoetic of discursivity, on par with enabling fictions like the Lockean notion of a "social contract", I contend that through a subversive reading of the text we might countermand (castrate) the Father's (Uranus) phallic tongue gaining an elusive/illusive temporal dimension in the imaginary (as sons of Chronos). How this restoration of our subjectivity is to occur, might be glimpst in the Derridian conceit of "the play of the signifier", only read through Baudrillard's notion of "the reversability of discourse" or, to put it otherwise, semiotic seduction -- the inscription of a lush curve of creative misprison beyond the defiles of the signifier, the elegant sine described by the soft underbelly of the hard topographic shell of language: spangles of allusion. An elegant sine because outside the impossible Demand of self-reference (Sartean illusion of the-in-itself-for-itsef) implied by Godel's therom of incompleteness -- the alienating frequencies* generated through semotic friction, graphemic entropy -- and its "entrainment" in a meta-frequency that only reproduces The-Name-Of-The-Fathers onanistic utterance; the mirror stage of linguistic philogeny which parallels the establishment of "the subject" in language, its incarceration in the speech of the Other.

To be continued...
(not really)

*Not to speak of other alienating frequencies such as those spoken of by Capitalist economists -- the damaging "reverberations" of the market analogous to those audible rhythms which are capable of inducing illness and disrupting cognition.
 
D

dirty mugu

Guest
you have same punctwation as bertie/realitybites i lub it when a flan comes together BITCH!
 
B

Bertie

Guest
Yes, you are so observant. Cod is my Yang. Bertie is my Yin. Got it?

Oh, and I love it when a flan comes together as well. It is all about precision -- egg/liquid ratio coupled with the oven temp/time of baking. Yummy. I'm hungry!
 
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