I hope this ends Morrissey's career

A

Anonymous

Guest
This childish yet over-the-hill narcissist who is retarded in a state of adolescence and has been over indulged by cultural forces because he wrote some good lyrics back in the 80's. This fatuous moron who really believes the entire planet revolves around him.
He's so arrogant and yet has such a tiny mind he didn't realise that writing a novel is a different discipline to writing a song. This overrated bloated flatulent figure who's life revolves around three opinions: he hates the royals, he hates thatcher, he hates meat eaters. Like there's no other evils currently occurring in the world. His political opinions are as one-note and repetitive as his endlessly predictable vocal melodies. It's about time this mediocre, washed-up bore was held to account for wasting people's time with his pointless shite. I'm so glad that's finally happened with The List Of The Lost.
Morrissey should have just rested on his laurels and enjoyed the adulation of his non-questioning idiot fans. Now by attempting to gain admiration in a grown up field of art he has over-reached and finally proven the truth to the world: he's a fat, flatulent pseudo-intellectual windbag who is good at writing teenage pop lyrics but that's about it.
So glad this bullshit worship of this massively flawed and over-indulged narcissist can finally draw to a close.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
This childish yet over-the-hill narcissist who is retarded in a state of adolescence and has been over indulged by cultural forces because he wrote some good lyrics back in the 80's. This fatuous moron who really believes the entire planet revolves around him.
He's so arrogant and yet has such a tiny mind he didn't realise that writing a novel is a different discipline to writing a song. This overrated bloated flatulent figure who's life revolves around three opinions: he hates the royals, he hates thatcher, he hates meat eaters. Like there's no other evils currently occurring in the world. His political opinions are as one-note and repetitive as his endlessly predictable vocal melodies. It's about time this mediocre, washed-up bore was held to account for wasting people's time with his pointless shite. I'm so glad that's finally happened with The List Of The Lost.
Morrissey should have just rested on his laurels and enjoyed the adulation of his non-questioning idiot fans. Now by attempting to gain admiration in a grown up field of art he has over-reached and finally proven the truth to the world: he's a fat, flatulent pseudo-intellectual windbag who is good at writing teenage pop lyrics but that's about it.
So glad this bullshit worship of this massively flawed and over-indulged narcissist can finally draw to a close.
says the person spouting his opinion on a site dedicated to him. narcissism indeed. i guess we should all listen to you morrissey included as you seem full of answers thatll save evryone from a singer we choose to listen to and follow to our own degrees. show us the way and tell us what to like and why
 

Poet

Banned
This childish yet over-the-hill narcissist who is retarded in a state of adolescence and has been over indulged by cultural forces because he wrote some good lyrics back in the 80's. This fatuous moron who really believes the entire planet revolves around him.
He's so arrogant and yet has such a tiny mind he didn't realise that writing a novel is a different discipline to writing a song. This overrated bloated flatulent figure who's life revolves around three opinions: he hates the royals, he hates thatcher, he hates meat eaters. Like there's no other evils currently occurring in the world. His political opinions are as one-note and repetitive as his endlessly predictable vocal melodies. It's about time this mediocre, washed-up bore was held to account for wasting people's time with his pointless shite. I'm so glad that's finally happened with The List Of The Lost.
Morrissey should have just rested on his laurels and enjoyed the adulation of his non-questioning idiot fans. Now by attempting to gain admiration in a grown up field of art he has over-reached and finally proven the truth to the world: he's a fat, flatulent pseudo-intellectual windbag who is good at writing teenage pop lyrics but that's about it.
So glad this bullshit worship of this massively flawed and over-indulged narcissist can finally draw to a close.
You're just jealous, Johnny. Fuck off.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
says the person spouting his opinion on a site dedicated to him. narcissism indeed. i guess we should all listen to you morrissey included as you seem full of answers thatll save evryone from a singer we choose to listen to and follow to our own degrees. show us the way and tell us what to like and why

I didn't say I'm here to tell people what to like. My contention is merely that Morrissey is a cunt and I believe this statement is factually accurate.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I didn't say I'm here to tell people what to like. My contention is merely that Morrissey is a cunt and I believe this statement is factually accurate.
You've gone to such great lengths to tell us this. Thank you.

Weirdo
 

NealCassidy

Well-Known Member
Why are you so angry about it? Just leave him alone, never listen to his songs, don't read his books, and don't log in to Morrissey-solo. It's quite easy.

What's the matter with these people?
 

Fiona

Love Morrissey ♥
I think I am in the minority here amongst the Solo members. I have read the book twice, and I enjoyed it. Here are my thoughts:


I personally ignored the main body of reviews in the media when List of the Lost was released. When I know I am going to read something, I want to begin primarily without other people’s projections, criticisms and assertions about the work. I read List of the Lost from a blank canvas – from a place of knowing very little about the story itself. I already knew Morrissey could write beautifully, as his first literary release Autobiography highlights, so I already had a certain expectation that this would be extremely well written.

List of the Lost is short - it unfolds over 118 pages, yet this shortness does not detract from the fullness of the story itself. Focusing on four main characters (Nails, Harri, Ezra and Justy) as they experience one summer of their lives in the heat and turmoil of the 1970’s, the central themes of this story are death and the internal struggle to find meaning in life. This is portrayed through the story as the characters navigate their way through a summer of loss, grief, fear – and a confrontation to the supernatural. There were some creepy moments intertwined within the story, too, which I found a really interesting aspect.

List of the Lost is not an easy novel to define. So many releases are easy to pigeon-hole and label, but Morrissey has managed to out-run the genre label by writing something that appears to work its way through various themes, always shifting out of grasp once you think you have a strong hold of what the story is about. At first, I believed it to be drama about friendship, but then after several dark twists and turns, we find that we are exploring death. Then the supernatural elements come creeping in - and before you realise it, you have experienced more in five pages than you do in 300 pages of many other stories.

I am personally a horror/paranormal fan myself, and there was enough darkness in these pages to keep me reeled in. I found it to be a beautiful, yet very twisted story. Hard to define, impossible to categorise, but one I personally found a pleasure to read.

I feel this work in fiction is almost as revealing as Autobiography. As a fan, this aspect obviously interests me. This book is not for everybody, but I personally enjoyed it. It's not perfect, but I've never come across anything that is.

I can appreciate that a novel like this is not going to be to everyone's taste, but I don't think this is a reflection on Morrissey's ability to write. Stories, like music, are a very personal thing - it's going to make some people happy, but not everybody.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I think I am in the minority here amongst the Solo members. I have read the book twice, and I enjoyed it. Here are my thoughts:


I personally ignored the main body of reviews in the media when List of the Lost was released. When I know I am going to read something, I want to begin primarily without other people’s projections, criticisms and assertions about the work. I read List of the Lost from a blank canvas – from a place of knowing very little about the story itself. I already knew Morrissey could write beautifully, as his first literary release Autobiography highlights, so I already had a certain expectation that this would be extremely well written.

List of the Lost is short - it unfolds over 118 pages, yet this shortness does not detract from the fullness of the story itself. Focusing on four main characters (Nails, Harri, Ezra and Justy) as they experience one summer of their lives in the heat and turmoil of the 1970’s, the central themes of this story are death and the internal struggle to find meaning in life. This is portrayed through the story as the characters navigate their way through a summer of loss, grief, fear – and a confrontation to the supernatural. There were some creepy moments intertwined within the story, too, which I found a really interesting aspect.

List of the Lost is not an easy novel to define. So many releases are easy to pigeon-hole and label, but Morrissey has managed to out-run the genre label by writing something that appears to work its way through various themes, always shifting out of grasp once you think you have a strong hold of what the story is about. At first, I believed it to be drama about friendship, but then after several dark twists and turns, we find that we are exploring death. Then the supernatural elements come creeping in - and before you realise it, you have experienced more in five pages than you do in 300 pages of many other stories.

I am personally a horror/paranormal fan myself, and there was enough darkness in these pages to keep me reeled in. I found it to be a beautiful, yet very twisted story. Hard to define, impossible to categorise, but one I personally found a pleasure to read.

I feel this work in fiction is almost as revealing as Autobiography. As a fan, this aspect obviously interests me. This book is not for everybody, but I personally enjoyed it. It's not perfect, but I've never come across anything that is.

I can appreciate that a novel like this is not going to be to everyone's taste, but I don't think this is a reflection on Morrissey's ability to write. Stories, like music, are a very personal thing - it's going to make some people happy, but not everybody.
They're a bunch of sad saviors Neal or just angry mean people.

Hey Fiona, your opinion I trust. I've got a list of stuff to read and this is on the list but that is for the review
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I think I am in the minority here amongst the Solo members. I have read the book twice, and I enjoyed it. Here are my thoughts:


I personally ignored the main body of reviews in the media when List of the Lost was released. When I know I am going to read something, I want to begin primarily without other people’s projections, criticisms and assertions about the work. I read List of the Lost from a blank canvas – from a place of knowing very little about the story itself. I already knew Morrissey could write beautifully, as his first literary release Autobiography highlights, so I already had a certain expectation that this would be extremely well written.

List of the Lost is short - it unfolds over 118 pages, yet this shortness does not detract from the fullness of the story itself. Focusing on four main characters (Nails, Harri, Ezra and Justy) as they experience one summer of their lives in the heat and turmoil of the 1970’s, the central themes of this story are death and the internal struggle to find meaning in life. This is portrayed through the story as the characters navigate their way through a summer of loss, grief, fear – and a confrontation to the supernatural. There were some creepy moments intertwined within the story, too, which I found a really interesting aspect.

List of the Lost is not an easy novel to define. So many releases are easy to pigeon-hole and label, but Morrissey has managed to out-run the genre label by writing something that appears to work its way through various themes, always shifting out of grasp once you think you have a strong hold of what the story is about. At first, I believed it to be drama about friendship, but then after several dark twists and turns, we find that we are exploring death. Then the supernatural elements come creeping in - and before you realise it, you have experienced more in five pages than you do in 300 pages of many other stories.

I am personally a horror/paranormal fan myself, and there was enough darkness in these pages to keep me reeled in. I found it to be a beautiful, yet very twisted story. Hard to define, impossible to categorise, but one I personally found a pleasure to read.

I feel this work in fiction is almost as revealing as Autobiography. As a fan, this aspect obviously interests me. This book is not for everybody, but I personally enjoyed it. It's not perfect, but I've never come across anything that is.

I can appreciate that a novel like this is not going to be to everyone's taste, but I don't think this is a reflection on Morrissey's ability to write. Stories, like music, are a very personal thing - it's going to make some people happy, but not everybody.
I completely agree with you, Fiona. I have read it twice and liked it more the second time. It's a dense novel. There's a lot in those 118 pages and the reviewers missed the plot. I've read and retread certain passages dozens of time because they were so beautiful. It's not perfect and some pages were a grind to get through. Overall it's a fantastic first novel. He did good. I hope the vicious reviews don't put him off writing another one.

- - - Updated - - -

They're a bunch of sad saviors Neal or just angry mean people.

Hey Fiona, your opinion I trust. I've got a list of stuff to read and this is on the list but that is for the review
im veen worse on the phone so thanks for the review
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
You've gone to such great lengths to tell us this. Thank you.

Weirdo
All you Morrissey fans can suck my bulbous salutation.
And if you see that pompous, fat, talentless, rancid gas filled windbag Morrissey, the flatulent bloated mass, tell him his "novel" makes excellent toilet paper.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
All you Morrissey fans can suck my bulbous salutation.
And if you see that pompous, fat, talentless, rancid gas filled windbag Morrissey, the flatulent bloated mass, tell him his "novel" makes excellent toilet paper.
Ha. $50 says YOU are overweight. Chill out. Move on as life is short. Fat ass.
 
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